Amulet of Khnum or Harsaphes (Heryshef)

Egyptian
Late Period, Dynasty 25–30
760–332 B.C.


Findspot: Egypt, Giza, Pit G 7540 X-II, in debris

Dimensions

Width x height: 1.1 x 4.3 cm (7/16 x 1 11/16 in.)

Accession Number

27.1979

Medium or Technique

Faience

Not On View

Collections

Jewelry, The Ancient World

Classifications

Amulets

This amulet of pale yellowish-green glazed faience depicts a ram-headed male deity standing and walking forward. Egypt, and later Nubia, had multiple ram gods and it is often difficult to identify which one is intended. This god may therefoe be Khnum, the patron deity of Elephantine (modern Aswan) or Harsaphes, the patron of Heracleopolis. In either case, amulets of this type were placed in burials to assist the rebirth of the deceased in the afterlife. There is a hole at the back for suspension.

Provenance

From Giza, Pit G 7540 X-II, in debris. 1927: excavated by the Harvard University–Museum of Fine Arts Expedition; assigned to the MFA in the division of finds by the government of Egypt.

Credit Line

Harvard University—Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition