Campanian fish plate

Greek, South Italian
Late Classical Period
about 350–325 B.C.
Related to D'Agostino Painter


Place of Manufacture: Italy, Campania

Catalogue Raisonné

Vase-Painting in Italy (MFA), no. 088; Highlights: Classical Art (MFA), p. 156.

Dimensions

Height: 5.5cm (2 3/16 in.) Diameter: 22.5cm (8 7/8in.)

Accession Number

01.8096

Medium or Technique

Ceramic, Red Figure

Not On View

Collections

Europe, The Ancient World

Classifications

Vessels

“Fish” plate. Has a flange falling from edge of base. Interior: Two fish and an octopus.
Circling the central depression are a bream, a striped perch, and an ocopus. A band of black dots cirlces the upper rim; around the overhanging rim is an ivy vine. As usual on Campanian fish-plates, the central depression is black and circled by a broad reserved stripe. The fish are carefully drawn, with much attention given to details such as the mouth, gills, mottling of the head and belly and placement of the stripes. Dilute glaze was used extensively on all three creatures particularly to define the eight arms of the octopus. The sketchy quality of the dilute glaze may have been achieved by feathering it with a dry brush.

VASE PAINTING in ITALY, #88 (01.8096)
Fish-Plate
Related to the D”Agostino Painter
3rd quarter of 4th century B.C.

Circling the central depression are a bream, a striped perch, and an octopus. A band of black dots circles the upper rim, around the overhanging rim is an ivy vine. As usual on Campanian fish-plates, the central depression is black and circled by a broad reserved stripe. The foot is reserved. The fish are carefully drawn, with much attention given to details such as the mouths, gills, mottling of the head and belly, and placement of the stripes. Dilute glaze was used extensively on all three creatures, particularly to define the eight arms of the octopus. The sketch quality of the dilute glaze may have been achieved by feathering it with a dry brush. McPhee and Grendall draw attention to the unusual use of black for the gills and fins, instead of the more normal white; they note also an affinity with early Paestan fish-plates, particularly in the drawing of the octopus and the use of a dotted outer border.

Provenance

By 1901: with E. P. Warren (according to Warren's records: Bought in Naples, said (& truly) to have been found at S. Maria di Capua); purchased by MFA from E. P. Warren, December 1901

Credit Line

Henry Lillie Pierce Fund