Card table

about 1760
J. S. Ingraham


Object Place: Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Dimensions

Overall: 73 x 90.2 x 42.5 cm (28 3/4 x 35 1/2 x 16 3/4 in.)

Accession Number

1991.1012

Medium or Technique

Mahogany, white pine

Not On View

Collections

Americas

Classifications

Tables, stands, screens

This table is made of mahogany, a tropical hardwood imported into colonial America from the West Indies and Central America. By the 1730s mahogany had become a fashionable cabinet wood in Boston, where it was sold at auctions or through merchants. William Douglass, a Boston physician, observed in 1755 that “Mahogany wood of the West Indies” was an excellent choice for furniture, “much surpassing the red cedar of Carolina and Bermudas, which has a disagreeable perfume.” Copley incorporated gleaming mahogany tabletops into several of his portraits, replicating to great effect the wood’s rich, reddish-brown color.

Inscription

Branded "J.S. INGRAHAM" on rear stay rail, and again, more lightly, on back of inside rear rail, behind the fly leg.
Faint chalk inscription on underside of top: "Mr. Lidle [?"

Provenance

History of ownership: possibly owned originally by J.S. Ingraham, whose name is branded on the piece; Ingraham may also be the maker; by 1928, published as in the collection of Clifford S. Drake; 1956, by descent to his daughter and lent by Miss Mary Drake, Cambridge, Mass., April 16; 1991, Mrs. Mary Drake Glazier, Peterborough, New Hampshire (Accession Date January 22, 1992)

Credit Line

Gift of Mary Drake in memory of Clifford S. Drake