Comb

Egyptian
Predynastic Period
Naqada I (Amratian) 3850–3650 B.C.


Findspot: Egypt, Naga el-Hai (Qena), tomb K 495

Dimensions

Height x width x depth: 14 x 3.7 x 14.1 cm (5 1/2 x 1 7/16 x 5 9/16 in.)

Accession Number

13.3509

Medium or Technique

Ivory

On View

Egypt: Pre-Dynastic and Dynastic (Gallery 105A)

Collections

Jewelry, The Ancient World

Classifications

Hair ornaments

Some of the earliest three-dimensional representations of humans and animals in Egyptian art appear on small, utilitarian items such as combs, pins, and cosmetic implements. Bone and ivory combs like this one, which features the head of a gazelle were probably worn as hair ornaments. They occur from the end of the Neolithic era, and reached the height of their popularity in the earliest phases of the Predynastic Period.


Some of the earliest three-dimensional representations of humans and animals in Egyptian art appear on small, utilitarian items such as combs, pins, and cosmetic implements. Bone and ivory combs like this one, which features the head of a gazelle were probably worn as hair ornaments. They occur from the end of the Neolithic era, and reached the height of their popularity in the earliest phases of the Predynastic Period.

Provenance

From Naga el-Hai (Qena), tomb K 495. February 7, 1913: excavated by the Harvard University-Museum of Fine Arts Expedition; 1913: assigned to the MFA by the government of Egypt.
(Accession Date: December 4, 1913)

Credit Line

Harvard University—Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition