Duck askos

Greek, South Italian
Late Classical to Early Hellenistic Period
about 330–320 B.C.


Place of Manufacture: Italy, Apulia

Catalogue Raisonné

Vase-Painting in Italy (MFA), no. 063.

Dimensions

19.6 x 16 cm (7 11/16 x 6 5/16 in.)

Accession Number

01.14

Medium or Technique

Ceramic, Red Figure

Not On View

Collections

Europe, The Ancient World

Classifications

Vessels

On front a woman seated on a rock, holding mirror in right hand and casket in left. Much yellow and white used.
On the front, below the mouth, a woman wearing shoes, a chiton, and a kekryphalos is seated to the right on a white-striped rock, looking to the left into the mirror she holds in her right hand. In her left is a cista. A large fan lies across her shins above her shoes. Her jewelry includes bracelets, necklace, and earrings, and a belt of white beads. A fillet secures her chignon. On the ground is a kalathos with yellow patterns. A flower grows beside the rock, and there is a dotted groundline below the woman’s foot.

ITALIAN VASE PAINTING in ITALY, # 63 - (01.14)
Askos
Close to the Baltimore Painter
about 330-320 B.C.
On the front, below the mouth, a woman wearing shoes, a chiton, and a kekryphalos is seated to the right on a white-striped rock, looking to the left into the mirror she holds in her right hand. In her lef thand is a cista, which, like the mirror, is colored yellow. A large fan, white, with a yellow handle, center, and rim, lies across her shins above her yellow and white shoes. Her jewelry includes yellow bracelets, necklace, and earrings, and a belt of white beads. A yellow fillet secures her chignon. On the ground at left is a kalathos with yellow patterns. A flower grows beside the rock, and there is a dotted groundline below the woman’s foot.
There is dotted egg-pattern around the neck and a circling groundline of wave-pattern. At the opposite end, beneath the “tail,” is a large palmette; smaller palmettes and scrolls dotted with yellow fill the sides.
Women of the type on this askos are frequently depicted holding offerings and sitting or standing on either side of a grave stele or naiskos, particularly on volute-kraters and amphorae; compare a woman with cista and wreath on a krater by the Baltimore Painter in the Dechter collection, Los Angeles (RVAp, II, p. 861, no. 27/3, pl. 319,3). So common is the scheme that an isolated figure like this is still charged with funerary symbolism.

Provenance

By date unknown: William J. Stillman Collection; purchased from William J. Stillman by Henry P. Kidder; gift of Mrs. Henry P. Kidder to MFA, January 28, 1901

Credit Line

Gift of Mrs. Henry P. Kidder