Mummy case and mummy of Ankhpefhor

Egyptian
Third Intermediate Period, early Dynasty 22
924–818 B.C.


Dimensions

Length: 179 cm (70 1/2 in.)

Accession Number

72.4837a

Medium or Technique

Cartonnage and human remains

Not On View

Collections

The Ancient World

Classifications

Coffins and sarcophagi

This object is the cartonnage mummy case of an individual named Ankhpefhor, whose mumy is inside. The case is anthropoid in shape wearing a tripartite wig. The face is gilded. The eyes and eyebrows are rendered with inlays. The case is covered with a white gesso ground. Decoration consists of ten registers of mythological scenes, the top two of which are partially occuppied with a large figure of the ram-headed Horus the Behdetite. The figures in the scenes are largely unpainted (though ancient varnishing gives a yellowish hue) save some details in red, blue, and green that have been applied mainly for wings of birds and winged deities as well as sacred symbols such as sun disks and ankh signs. A similar palette of colors has been used for a very elaborately painted multi-stranded necklace/collar that covers the upper toso and shoulders of the figure and a banded headdress. A dark blue background was added after the figures had been outlined. The hair of the figure depicted by the case is painted with black lines. Flaking remnants of paint on the face indicate that it was originally painted reddish-brown. Hands on the coffin are modeled in relief as though crossed over the chest. The case is inscribed for “the Offerer of Southern Heliopolis, Ankhpefhor.”

This case is part of a set that also includes objects 72.4837b-d

Provenance

Likely from Thebes. By 1836: Robert Hay Collection, Linplum, Scotland; 1863: to his son, Robert James Alexander Hay; 1868-1872: Way Collection, Boston (purchased by Samuel A. Way through London dealers Rollin and Feuardent, 27 Haymarket); 1872: given to the MFA by Samuel's son, C. Granville Way. (Accession Date: June 28, 1872)
(Numbers reassigned and corrected: September 20, 1995)

Credit Line

Hay Collection—Gift of C. Granville Way