Rabbit bowl

December 1908
Paul Revere Pottery of the Saturday Evening Girls club (active 1908–1942), Decorated by Sara Galner (American, born Austria–Hungary, 1894–1982)


Object Place: Boston, Massachusetts

Dimensions

Overall: 3.8 x 15.6 cm (1 1/2 x 6 1/8 in.)

Accession Number

2007.367

Medium or Technique

Earthenware with glaze

Not On View

Collections

Americas

Classifications

Earthenware

The Paul Revere Pottery was established in Boston’s North End in 1908 under the direction of Edith Guerrier and her artistic partner, Edith Brown. Guerrier ran the neighborhood’s branch of the Boston Public Library and had developed educational clubs for local immigrant girls, primarily of Italian and Eastern European heritage. The clubs were part of a city-wide effort to keep these girls “off the streets” and to assimilate them into the American way of life.

Financed by philanthropist Helen Osborne Storrow, the pottery’s mission was to help support the library clubs and to offer the oldest girls, members of the Saturday Evening Girls (SEG) club, an opportunity to earn money in a healthy and stimulating work environment. This child’s bowl - decorated with rabbits, turtles, and the advice “The race is not always to the swift”- is one of the earliest known works produced by the pottery and shows the early, gritty surfaces that were soon replaced with high gloss glazes.

This text was adapted from Ward, et al., MFA Highlights: American Decorative Arts & Sculpture (Boston, 2006) available at www.mfashop.com/mfa-publications.html.

Inscription

"THE RACE IS NOT ALWAYS TO THE SWIFT"

Markings

(painted on base): "35 12 08 / S.E.G." [surrounded by a polygon]
(in pencil on base): "S.G."- very faint

Provenance

Early history unknown; some time between 1987 and 2005, acquired by Dr. David L. Bloom, Morristown, NJ, then Boston, MA; given by Dr. David L. Bloom to the MFA (Accession date: XXXX)

Credit Line

Gift of Dr. David L. Bloom and family in honor of his mother, Sara Galner Bloom

Copyright

Reproduced with permission.