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MFA Images: Motherhood

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  • Woman Feeding a Child

    1861
    Jean-François Millet (French, 1814–1875)

    Description

    Signed

    Lower left in the plate: J. F. Millet 1861.

    Provenance

    Donor of MFA Tudor Room. [SWR queries this info. 10/2001]

    Credit Line

    Gift of Miss Aimée and Miss Rosamond Lamb

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Delteil 17, iii

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 21.1 x 15.8 cm (8 5/16 x 6 1/4 in.) before plate was cut down. Sheet: 32.7 x 25.3 cm (12 7/8 x 9 15/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    1973.57

    Medium or Technique

    Etching on heavy, pale gray antique laid paper

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe, Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Prints

    More Info
  • "Ah! Mon Beau Chateau...!! - Robe de maison par Doucet," plate VIII from Gazette du Bon Ton, Volume 1, No. 6

    French
    April 1913
    Drésa (French French), Illustrating design by Jacques Doucet (French, 1853–1929), Publisher Librairie Centrale des Beaux-arts

    Object Place: Paris, France

    Description

    Robe de maison de Doucet en mousseline de laine à petites côtes; corsage brodé de petites roses; manches et volants de mousseline galonnés de rubans.

    Provenance

    By 1952, William Morris Hunt Memorial Library; accessioned by MFA, Boston, February 12, 2004

    Credit Line

    Transferred from the William Morris Hunt Memorial Library

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 25.4 x 19.1 cm (10 x 7 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    2004.11.8

    Medium or Technique

    Photomechanical lithograph with hand-applied color (pochoir)

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Books and manuscripts, Books

    More Info
  • "Portrait de Mme. V. R. et de sa fille - Robes, de Jeanne Lanvin," plate 69 from Gazette du Bon Ton, Volume 2, No. 9

    French
    November 1922
    Charles Martin (French, 1884–1934), Illustrating design by Jeanne Lanvin (French, 1867–1946), Publisher Librairie Centrale des Beaux-arts

    Object Place: Paris, France

    Description

    Deux robes de Jeanne Lanvin: l’une en crèpe brodé chenille et argent; chevrons et cocardes en velours. L’autre, la robe de fillette, en velours noir et crèpe de chine; boutons d’argent en forme de glands.

    Provenance

    By 1952, William Morris Hunt Memorial Library; accessioned by MFA, Boston, February 12, 2004

    Credit Line

    Transferred from the William Morris Hunt Memorial Library

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 25.4 x 19.1 cm (10 x 7 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    2004.54.5

    Medium or Technique

    Lithograph with hand-applied color (pochoir)

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Books and manuscripts, Books

    More Info
  • Man, woman, and child under flowered tree

    English
    1759–70
    Made at Chelsea Manufactory (England, active 1745-1769)

    Object Place: England

    Description

    Man, woman and child under red flowered tree. Man seated on white gold rimmed barrel, with barrel in front of him, dressed in black hat, red coat, pink breeches. Woman, nursing infant in yellow dress, wears green dress with lavendar bodice. Child in brown

    Provenance

    By 1930, Richard C. Paine (b. 1893 - d. 1966), Boston; 1930, gift of Richard C. Paine to the MFA. (Accession date: April 3, 1930)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Richard C. Paine

    Details

    Dimensions

    15.88 cm (6 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    30.338

    Medium or Technique

    Soft-paste porcelain

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Ceramics, Porcelain

    More Info
  • By the Riverside

    Henry Lerolle (French, 1848–1929)

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1881 with Henry Lerolle. Blakeslee Galleries. New York, NY, USA. By 1884, with Francis C Foster, Cambridge, MA, USA; 1884 - Boston, MA, USA. Museum of Fine Arts (gift of Foster) (Accession date: March 17, 1884)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Francis C. Foster

    Details

    Dimensions

    470.9 x 300 cm (185 3/8 x 118 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    84.248

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Caritas

    1894–95
    Abbott Handerson Thayer (American, 1849–1921 American)

    Description

    Abbott Handerson Thayer was one of the best-known artists in the United States during the 1890s. His art, often inspired by the Italian Renaissance and classical antiquity, fulfilled the aspirations of a country seeking to establish itself on an international stage as the new Rome. With large public buildings in classical styles, with murals, and with allegorical representations like Caritas, American artists created an image of strength and confidence that came to characterize the American Renaissance.
    Thayer first studied painting in Boston and Brooklyn, then traveled to Paris in 1875 to train at the prestigious Ecole des Beaux-Arts. He based his career in New York but produced much of his work in the summer studios he kept, first in South Woodstock, Connecticut, and then in Dublin, New Hampshire. The model for the main figure in Caritas was Elise Pumpelly, daughter of a well-known Harvard geologist, who also summered in Dublin and posed frequently for Thayer. The artist idealized her by dressing her in a classical Greek chiton, using its long columnar folds to give the impression of stability and strength. The two children, innocent and trustful, seem embodiments of natural purity. The setting is enlivened by Thayer’s opalescent strokes of paint, flickers of light green and blue that seem to vibrate with the freshness of spring.

    An intensely spiritual man, Thayer sought to imbue his paintings with the moral principles of his age, hoping to communicate such abstract ideals as virtue, beauty, and truth. In 1893 (along with ElihuVedder [06.2430]and John LaFarge [20.1873]), Thayer had been commissioned to paint a mural for the art museum at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, an allegorical composition symbolizing the city of Florence. That mural, depicting a winged woman with outstretched arms that protect two children, may have inspired Caritas. The image was a traditional representation of the virtue Charity (caritas in Latin), and the title became associated with this painting when it was first exhibited in Philadelphia in 1895. Thayer later wrote to the MFA asking to change it, explaining that he felt “Spring” or “Morning” would be more appropriate; [1]in 1899 he wrote again, telling the Museum’s director that he detested the picture and asking to trade it for another.[2]

    Despite the artist’s continued protestations, Caritas was highly admired from the time of its first exhibition and won a large prize in Philadelphia. When it was first shown in Boston in 1897, a group of local painters and collectors raised the funds to buy Caritas for the MFA. They explained that they felt it was of utmost importance that the finest modern works by America’s leading contemporary artists should be represented in the Museum’s collections.

    Notes
    1. Abbott Handerson Thayer to Charles Greeley Loring, December 15, [no year], curatorial files, Department of Art of the Americas, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
    2. Abbott Handerson Thayer to Charles Greeley Loring, December 13, 1899, curatorial files, Department of Art of the Americas, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

    This text was adapted from Elliot Bostwick Davis et al., American Painting [http://www.mfashop.com/9020398034.html], MFA Highlights (Boston: MFA Publications, 2003).

    Inscription

    Lower right: Abbott H. Thayer

    Provenance

    1897, sold by the artist to the MFA for $8,000. (Accession Date: April 15, 1897)

    Credit Line

    Warren Collection—William Wilkins Warren Fund and contributions

    Details

    Dimensions

    216.53 x 140.33 cm (85 1/4 x 55 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    97.199

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Jan and Warren Adelson Gallery (Gallery 221)

    Collections

    Americas

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Figurine of woman nursing a child (Aphrodite Kourotrophos)

    Cypriote
    Cypro-Archaic Period
    600–480 B.C.

    Description

    This standing figure is of the type Aphrodite Kourotrophos (Nursing Woman) and depicts a woman nursing her child. Most Aphrodite Kourotrophos figures are seated and standing examples, such as this one, are rare. A similar type with the goddess Isis nursing her son Horus is found in Egypt. A strong Egyptianizing style is seen here in the hair and face. This could be an image of Cypriot Aphrodite as kourotrophos, which adopts the Phoenician-Egyptianizing kourotrophos type.

    The figure is very flat and was probably propped up against a wall or bench in a sanctuary.

    The figure bears no trace of color.

    Provenance

    By date unknown: with General Luigi Palma di Cesnola (from Cyprus); May 16, 1872: purchased by MFA from General Luigi Palma di Cesnola for $ 1,704.39 (this figure is the total price for MFA 72.1-72.473 and 72.4871-72.4900)

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated by subscription

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 17.8 x 5.2 x 3 cm (7 x 2 1/16 x 1 3/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    72.158

    Medium or Technique

    Limestone

    Not On View

    Collections

    The Ancient World

    Classifications

    Sculpture

    More Info
  • "Les Premières Roses - Costume Tailleur pour le matin," plate II from Gazette du Bon Ton, Volume 1, No. 5

    French
    March 1913
    Francisco Javier Gosé (Spanish, 1876–1915), Publisher Librairie Centrale des Beaux-arts

    Object Place: Paris, France

    Description

    Ce costume tailleur est composé d’une jaquette en forme de blouse serrée à la taille par une ceinture fermant derrière. La jupe est étroite et garnie dans le haut d’un drapé en forme de pannier.

    Provenance

    By 1952, William Morris Hunt Memorial Library; accessioned by MFA, Boston, February 12, 2004

    Credit Line

    Transferred from the William Morris Hunt Memorial Library

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 25.4 x 19.1 cm (10 x 7 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    2004.10.2

    Medium or Technique

    Photomechanical lithograph with hand-applied color (pochoir)

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Books and manuscripts, Books

    More Info
  • Figure vase in the form of a woman and child

    Egyptian
    New Kingdom, mid-Dynasty 18
    1435–1380 B.C.

    Description

    This delightful little bottle takes the form of a kneeling woman, holding a child about to nurse in her lap. A consummate example of the potter’s craft, the bottle was made in several parts, probably using molds, with incised details added later. The entire vessel was then covered with a reddish brown slip or wash and was heavily burnished, skillfully concealing the joins. The small size, fanciful shape, and distinctive reddish brown color identify this bottle as one of a select group of pottery containers known as figure vases. The category includes other figural vessels in the shape of a standing woman carrying a basket or playing a lute, or with necks in the form of a woman’s head, as well as vessels in the form of wildlife such as fish, grasshoppers, hedgehogs, or reclining ibexes with fawns. Another related group cleverly imitates leather bags or stone vessels. Figure vases are fairly restricted in date to a period of some forty years at most, from the end of the reign of Thutmose III to the beginning of the reign of Amenhotep III.

    Nursing-woman vases form a distinct subgroup of figure vases. Other known examples are so similar to Boston’s in size and composition that they all must have been made by the same potters using the same molds. Their small size and narrow mouths suggest that they were meant to contain some precious, perishable substance such as a cosmetic or medicine, perhaps even mother’s milk. Mother’s milk was used in ancient Egypt as an ingredient in various medical prescriptions, not all of them pediatric. The vessel’s capacity is roughly equal to the amount a single breast produces at one feeding.

    The subject of this bottle, so evocative of Isis and Horus, may have held a reassuring message in any of a number of contexts, funerary or otherwise. As the son of Isis and Osiris, Horus was the rightful heir to Egypt’s throne. To hide him from his jealous uncle Seth, Isis took the infant Horus to the Delta marshes, shielding him with her magic from snakes and scorpions. Isis therefore became in the Egyptian consciousness the archetypal protective mother.

    Provenance

    By 1985: with Jean-Louis Domercq, Galerie du Sycamore, Paris; 1985: purchased by the MFA from Jean-Louis Domercq, June 26, 1985. (Accession Date: June 26, 1985)

    Credit Line

    Frank B. Bemis Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Height x width x depth: 14 x 5.3 x 8 cm (5 1/2 x 2 1/16 x 3 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1985.336

    Medium or Technique

    Pottery, red polished clay

    On View

    Egyptian New Kingdom Gallery (Gallery 210)

    Collections

    The Ancient World

    Classifications

    Vessels

    More Info
  • Amulet of Hathor nursing a queen

    Nubian
    Napatan Period, reign of Piankhy (Piye)
    743–712 B.C.

    Findspot: el-Kurru, Nubia, Sudan

    Description

    This gilded silver amulet shows the Kushite Queen Nefrukakashta being embraced and suckled by a goddess, probably Mut, the patron goddess of the royal women of the 25th Dynasty. Nefrukakashta grasps the wrist of the hand that offers the breast, while the goddess’s other arm encircles the queen’s shoulder and rests on the queen’s breast. The goddess wears the vulture headdress and a crown consisting of a diadem with bovine horns and the solar disc. The claw of the vulture touches the queen’s uraeus, and its outstretched wing caresses that of the goddess. The goddess wears a tight sheath that reveals her slenderness, while the queen’s body expresses the curvier Kushite feminine ideal.

    Provenance

    From el-Kurru, Ku 52 (tomb of Queen Nefrukekashta). 1919: excavated by the Harvard University–Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition; assigned to the MFA in the division of finds by the government of Sudan. (Accession date: March 1, 1919)

    Credit Line

    Harvard University—Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition

    Details

    Dimensions

    Height x width: 2 1/4 x 3/4 in. (5.7 x 1.9 cm)

    Accession Number

    24.928

    Medium or Technique

    Silver

    On View

    Rita J. and Stanley H. Kaplan Family Foundation Gallery (Gallery 104)

    Collections

    Jewelry, The Ancient World

    Classifications

    Jewelry / Adornment, Amulets

    More Info
  • Woman holding a child

    Cypriote
    Hellenistic Period
    323–31 B.C.

    Description

    Fragment of statuette of woman holding a child. Drapery carried over woman’s head and around child. Missing below the waist.

    Provenance

    By date unknown: with General Luigi Palma di Cesnola (from Cyprus); May 16, 1872: purchased by MFA from General Luigi Palma di Cesnola for $ 1,704.39 (this figure is the total price for MFA 72.1-72.473 and 72.4871-72.4900)

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated by subscription

    Details

    Dimensions

    8 cm (3 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    72.170

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta

    Not On View

    Collections

    The Ancient World

    Classifications

    Sculpture

    More Info
  • Kanamono in the form of a family group with a child, mother and grandmother

    Japanese
    Edo period–Meiji era
    mid to late 19th century (before 1889)
    Unno Moritoshi (Japanese, 1834–1896 Japanese), School Unno School (Japanese Japanese)

    Description

    Signed

    [Moritoshi] 盛壽

    Provenance

    1890, Charles Goddard Weld Collection; bequest to MFA, Boston, December 7, 1911.

    Credit Line

    Charles Goddard Weld Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 5 x 0.7 cm (1 15/16 x 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    11.5627

    Medium or Technique

    Main material: gold; other metals: shakudô, shibuichi and copper; decorative technique: uchidashi, takabori, zôgan

    Not On View

    Collections

    Asia

    Classifications

    Arms and armor

    More Info
  • Mother and Child in a Boat

    1892
    Edmund Charles Tarbell (American, 1862–1938)

    Description

    Although Edmund Charles Tarbell had been exposed to Impressionism during his student days in Paris from 1884 to 1886, it was not until 1890 that he started painting in this progressive style. His conversion was no doubt influenced by the exhibition in 1890 of Sargent’s A Morning Walk (private collection), the first of his Impressionist works to be shown in Boston. Tarbell painted Mother and Child in a Boat using his wife Emeline and daughter Josephine as models. He rendered the shimmer of light on the water and the dappled sunlight on the rowboat and costumes with strokes of pure color. Reluctant to relinquish his hard-earned drawing skills—his avowed purpose for studying in Paris—Tarbell carefully delineated his wife’s hands and features and deftly foreshortened his daughter’s left leg. The overhanging branches and high viewpoint, aspects borrowed from Japanese prints, provide an intimate view of these figures in a boat, a popular motif for both French and American Impressionists. Sargent had painted a strikingly similar composition, Two Women Asleep in a Punt under the Willows (1887, CalousteGulbenkian Museum, Lisbon), which Tarbell may have known through his friend Dennis Miller Bunker [45.475], who worked with Sargent in 1888 and who had exhibited his own Impressionist landscapes alongside Sargent’s.

    This text was adapted from Janet L. Comey’s entry in Impressionism Abroad: Boston and French Painting, by Erica E. Hirshler et al., exh. cat. (London: Royal Academy of Arts, 2005).

    Inscription

    Lower right: Edmund C. Tarbell/1892

    Provenance

    By 1893, Clara Bertram Kimball (died 1920), Boston; 1920, by inheritance to her husband, David P. Kimball (1833-1923), Boston [1]; 1923, bequest of David P. Kimball to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 1, 1923) [1] In 1923 David P. Kimball bequeathed forty paintings to the MFA in memory of his wife, Clara Bertram Kimball. He noted in his will that these were "from the collection made by her and bequeathed to me."

    Credit Line

    Bequest of David P. Kimball in memory of his wife Clara Bertram Kimball

    Details

    Dimensions

    76.52 x 88.9 cm (30 1/8 x 35 in.)

    Accession Number

    23.532

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Croll Gallery (Gallery 227)

    Collections

    Americas

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Mother and Child

    about 1904
    Gari Melchers (American, 1860–1932)

    Description

    Inscription

    Upper left: Gari Melchers.

    Provenance

    The artist; Mrs. Louis Hines; with Vose Galleries, Boston; to MFA, 1933, purchased for $2,000.

    Credit Line

    The Hayden Collection—Charles Henry Hayden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    54.61 x 40.64 cm (21 1/2 x 16 in.)

    Accession Number

    33.10

    Medium or Technique

    Pastel on paper mounted on paperboard

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Woman with a Parasol and Small Child on a Sunlit Hillside

    about 1874–76
    Pierre-Auguste Renoir (French, 1841–1919)

    Description

    Renoir’s model for this painting was likely Camille Monet, wife of his fellow Impressionist Claude Monet; Renoir painted her on several occasions between 1874 and 1876. Here she sits on a hillside, her white dress dappled with pink and blue in the shade. Her grace and composure stand in marked contrast to the toddling child who wanders off into the background at right, oblivious of the painter’s presence.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Renoir

    Provenance

    August 25, 1891, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 1541) [see note 1]; transferred from Durand-Ruel, Paris, to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 1845-4935); January 14, 1917, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to Josef Stransky (b. 1872 - d. 1936), New York; sold by Stransky to Duncan Phillips (b. 1886 - d. 1966), Washington, D.C.; April 30, 1926, sold by Phillips to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 8239); April 27, 1926 or 1927, sold by Durand-Ruel to John Taylor Spaulding (b. 1870 - d. 1948), Boston [see note 2]; 1948, bequest of John Taylor Spaulding to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 3, 1948) NOTES: [1] The provenance given here was provided by Durand-Ruel, Paris in a letter to the MFA (January 4, 1962; in MFA curatorial file); also see François Daulte, "Auguste Renoir: Catalogue Raisonné de l'Oeuvre Peint, I. Figures, 1860 - 1890" (Lausanne, 1971), cat. no. 260. [2] In their letter to the MFA (as above, n. 1) Durand-Ruel stated that they purchased the painting from Mr. Phillips on April 30, 1926 and sold it to John Taylor Spaulding in April 1926. Mr. Spaulding's receipt is dated April 27, 1926. Daulte (as above, n. 1) gives Spaulding' s purchase date as April 27, 1927.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Dimensions

    47.0 x 56.2 cm (18 1/2 x 22 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.593

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Sidney and Esther Rabb Gallery (Gallery 255)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Mother and Child

    undated
    Jacob Brugmann (Netherlandish, 1834–1897 Netherlandish)

    Description

    Signed

    Lower right: J. Brugmann

    Provenance

    Acquired June 1915

    Credit Line

    William R. Wilson Donation

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 55.7 x 37.9 cm (21 15/16 x 14 15/16 in. )

    Accession Number

    15.879

    Medium or Technique

    Watercolor

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe, Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Watercolors

    More Info
  • Gathering Fruit

    about 1893
    Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: in graphite, lower left corner: L (in script); in graphite, lower right corner: art dernier état 85I (illeg.)

    Signed

    Not signed

    Markings

    Fortuna on globe with VDL and VanderLey watermark

    Provenance

    Jean Goriany, from whom purchased by MFA Nov. 13, 1941

    Credit Line

    Gift of William Emerson and The Hayden Collection—Charles Henry Hayden Fund

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 157 (state not in Breeskin); Mathews and Shapiro 15, ix/xi

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 42.2 x 29.5 cm (16 5/8 x 11 5/8 in.) Sheet: 50 x 38.5 cm (19 11/16 x 16 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    41.813

    Medium or Technique

    Drypoint, soft ground etching, and aquatint in color

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas, Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Prints

    More Info
  • Mother and Child

    1777-79
    Jean-Honoré Fragonard (French, 1732–1806)

    Description

    Provenance

    Francois Alexandre-Frederic de la Rochefoucauld (b. 1747-d. 1827) Paris; June 20-23, 1827, posthumous La Rochefoucault sale, through Roland and Laneuville, Paris, lot 19 [see note 1]. Madame Corbin, Paris [see note 2]. February 20, 1945, sold by Wildenstein and Co. New York, to Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876- d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA (Accession Date: January 8, 1969). Notes: [1] In the same lot as its (now lost) companion, "a mother making her child say 'please' before giving him some bread," (see Zafran catalogue, 1998, no.59). [2] According to Wildenstein at the time of the sale to Forsyth Wickes.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 46.4 x 37.5cm (18 1/4 x 14 3/4in.) Framed: 58.1 x 49.5 x 7 cm (22 7/8 x 19 1/2 x 2 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2644

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Mother and Child

    about 1865
    William Morris Hunt (American, 1824–1879)

    Description

    Provenance

    The artist; to Louisa D. (Mrs. William Morris) Hunt, wife of the artist; to Paul Hunt, Elinor Hunt Diederich, and Enid Hunt Slater, her children; descended in family; to MFA, 2000, partial gift of WIlliam Morris Hunt II.

    Credit Line

    Partial gift of William Morris Hunt II

    Details

    Dimensions

    142.9 x 91.4 cm (56 1/4 x 36 in.)

    Accession Number

    2000.1232

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Mother and Child Playing with Toys

    Japanese
    Late Meiji era
    Artist Unknown, Japanese

    Place of Creation: Japan

    Description

    Provenance

    Leonard A. Lauder Collection, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Fractional gift of Lauder (Accession date: March 20, 2002).

    Credit Line

    Leonard A. Lauder Collection of Japanese Postcards

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 13.8 x 8.8 cm (5 7/16 x 3 7/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    2002.4487

    Medium or Technique

    Color lithograph; ink on card stock

    Not On View

    Collections

    Asia, Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Postcards

    More Info
  • Georgianna Buckham and Her Mother (Anna Traphagen Buckham)

    1839
    Henry Inman (American, 1801–1846)

    Description

    Henry Inman was trained by the esteemed New York portraitist John Wesley Jarvis, and he soon rivaled his master in attracting commissions from prominent New York families. Inman worked briefly in Philadelphia, where he founded one of the first lithography firms in the United States. Between the mid-1830s and his death in 1846, he was among New York’s most popular painters.
    In this serene and elegant portrait, one of the artist’s best known, Inman depicted Anna Traphagen Buckham and her daughter Georgianna. He also painted a companion portrait of her husband, George Buckham, an affluent New York attorney, a friend of the artist, and later a pallbearer at his funeral. Here, mother and daughter are fashionably attired. Mrs. Buckham wears a fancy cap adorned with blue silk flowers and lace; Georgianna, about five years old in this picture, stands in front of her mother in a brightly colored plaid dress. Mrs. Buckham places her arm around her daughter’s shoulders in a gesture that is both affectionate and protective. Although Inman painted a number of other portraits of children, it was in “Georgianna Buckham and Her Mother” that he was best able to capture the softness of a little girl’s skin and the sweetness of her smile.

    This text was adapted from Carol Troyen and Janet Comey, “Children in American Art” (Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 2007, in Japanese).

    Provenance

    The artist; to George Buckham, New York, father of the sitter; to Georgianna Buckham Wright, the sitter, his daughter; to MFA, 1919, gift of Georgianna Buckham Wright.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Georgianna Buckham Wright

    Details

    Dimensions

    86.68 x 68.9 cm (34 1/8 x 27 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.1370

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Mother Holding Thomas Carew Hunt Martin as Infant

    Bedroom with a mother holding a child

    June 22, 1857
    Unidentified artist, American, 19th century

    Description

    Inscription

    Below in pen and ink: Thomas Carew Hunt Martin, aged 4 mos. June 22nd, 1857 Gatty House, Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. U.S.A.

    Provenance

    Maxim Karolik, Newport; Gift to MFA Nov. 12, 1953

    Credit Line

    Gift of Maxim Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Watercolors and Drawings, 1800–1875

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Karolik cat. no 762, fig. 160

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 17.8 x 22.9 cm (7 x 9 in.)

    Accession Number

    53.2425

    Medium or Technique

    Watercolor on paper

    Not On View

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  • Peasant Mother and Child

    about 1894
    Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: in graphite, lower right, below plate: Mary Cassatt

    Signed

    Signed

    Provenance

    PDP Register entry: Date acquired, 6/3/1903

    Credit Line

    Denman Waldo Ross Collection

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 159, iv/v; Mathews & Shapiro 17, x/x

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 29.9 x 24.3 cm (11 3/4 x 9 9/16 in.) Sheet: 43.7 x 30.2 cm (17 3/16 x 11 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    M19777

    Medium or Technique

    Drypoint and color aquatint

    Not On View

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  • In the Omnibus

    about 1891
    Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: in graphite, lower left corner: F; in graphite, lower left, below plate: MC

    Signed

    Initialed

    Provenance

    Jean Goriany, from whom purchased by MFA Nov. 13, 1941

    Credit Line

    Gift of William Emerson and The Hayden Collection—Charles Henry Hayden Fund

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 145 (state not in Breeskin); Mathews & Shapiro 07, trial proof F of vi/vii

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 36.5 x 26.8 cm (14 3/8 x 10 9/16 in.) Sheet: 43.4 x 29.6 cm (17 1/16 x 11 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    41.805

    Medium or Technique

    Soft ground etching, drypoint and color aquatint

    Not On View

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  • Maternal Caress

    about 1891
    Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: in graphite, lower left corner: A; in graphite, lower right, below plate: Imprimé par l' artiste et M. LeRoy/ Mary Cassatt

    Signed

    Signed

    Markings

    Recto: in blue ink, lower center of plate: collector's stamp of Mary Cassatt (Lugt 604)

    Provenance

    Jean Goriany, from whom purchased by MFA Nov. 13, 1941

    Credit Line

    Gift of William Emerson and The Hayden Collection—Charles Henry Hayden Fund

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 150, iii/iii; Mathews & Shapiro 12, trial proof A of vi/vi

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 37 x 26.8 cm (14 9/16 x 10 9/16 in.) Sheet: 48.4 x 31 cm (19 1/16 x 12 3/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    41.808

    Medium or Technique

    Drypoint, soft ground etching and color aquatint

    Not On View

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  • The Bath

    The Tub

    about 1891
    Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: in graphite, lower left, below plate: M.C

    Signed

    Initialed

    Markings

    Verso: in blue ink, lower center of plate: collector's stamp of Mary Cassatt (Lugt 604)

    Provenance

    1941, sold by Jean Goriany (dealer), New York, to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 13, 1941)

    Credit Line

    Gift of William Emerson and The Hayden Collection—Charles Henry Hayden Fund

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 143 (state not in Breeskin); Mathews & Shapiro 05, xvii/xvii

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 31.8 x 24.6 cm (12 1/2 x 9 11/16 in.) Sheet: 43.6 x 27.9 cm (17 3/16 x 11 in.)

    Accession Number

    41.806

    Medium or Technique

    Drypoint, soft ground etching and aquatint in color

    Out on Loan

    On display at Setagaya Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan, June 28, 2014 – September 15, 2014

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  • Caresse Maternelle

    about 1902
    Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Though born and trained in the United States, Cassatt lived nearly her whole life in France. She was the only American, and one of only three women, to exhibit with the Impressionist group; by 1894 she had sold enough work to be able to purchase a château in Mesnil-Théribus (about ninety kilometers northwest of Paris), where she lived and worked for much of the year.
    It was at her château that she painted “Caresse Maternelle.” Best known for her images of mothers and children, Cassatt was likely inspired to explore this theme by her many nieces and nephews, whom she adored, as well as by images of the Madonna and Child from the Italian Renaissance. Her interest in the subject also reflects the late nineteenth-century fascination with maternity and the new emphasis on child care.
    In “Caresse Maternelle,” Cassatt’s models are tightly entwined, and their poses seem entirely natural. In what seems to be a spontaneous expression of affection, the little girl kneels in the mother’s lap and hugs her around her neck. Their cheek-to-cheek embrace completes the image of tender intimacy. Cassatt used long brushstrokes to render the dresses of mother and daughter, and the softness of the fabric augments the sweet feminine atmosphere. Although Cassatt was never married and had no children of her own, she had a remarkable ability to portray the special love between mother and child.

    This text was adapted from Carol Troyen and Janet Comey, “Children in American Art” (Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 2007, in Japanese).

    Inscription

    Lower right: Mary Cassatt

    Provenance

    The artist; with Durand-Ruel, Paris; Mrs. John M. Longyear, by 1915; (auction of the Longyear estate); Miss Aimee Lamb, by about 1939; to MFA, 1970, gift of Miss Aimee Lamb.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Miss Aimée Lamb in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Horatio Appleton Lamb

    Details

    Dimensions

    92.07 x 73.34 cm (36 1/4 x 28 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1970.252

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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    Americas

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  • Under the Horse-Chestnut Tree

    about 1895
    Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: In graphite, lower left, below plate: no. 1; in graphite, lower right, below plate: Mary Cassatt

    Signed

    Signed

    Markings

    Watermark: Heawood 2749

    Provenance

    W. G. Russell Allen; MFA received by bequest April 10, 1963

    Credit Line

    Bequest of W. G. Russell Allen

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 162 (state not in Breeskin); Mathews & Shapiro 20, iii/iii

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 40.2 x 28.7 cm (15 13/16 x 11 5/16 in.) Sheet: 48.1 x 38.8 cm (18 15/16 x 15 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.313

    Medium or Technique

    Drypoint and color aquatint

    Not On View

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  • Camille Monet and a Child in the Artist's Garden in Argenteuil

    1875
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Camille, Monet’s first wife, is shown with a child in the garden of their house in Argenteuil, near Paris, where they lived between 1872 and 1877. The shimmering reds, blues, greens, and white that capture the brilliance of a sun-drenched day are applied with many small brushstrokes, whose varied shapes create the different textures of flowers, grass, and clothing.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 75

    Provenance

    October 1875, possibly sold by the artist to Clément Courtois, Mulhouse [see note 1]. Julius Oehme, Paris. 1900, with Durand-Ruel, Paris and New York. By 1905, Desmond FitzGerald (b. 1846 - d. 1926), Brookline, MA [see note 2]; April 21, 1927, FitzGerald sale, American Art Association, New York, lot 187, sold for $12,000 to Edwin Sibley Webster (b. 1867 - d. 1950) and Jane Hovey Webster (b. 1870 - d. 1969), Newton, MA; by descent to an anonymous donor, New York; 1976, year-end, anonymous gift to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 12, 1977) NOTES: [1] The provenance given here (to 1927) is taken from Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: Catalogue Raisonné" (1996), vol. 2, p. 157, cat. no. 382. [2] He lent the painting to the exhibition "Loan Collection of Paintings by Claude Monet and Eleven Sculptures by Auguste Rodin," Copley Society, Boston, March 1905, cat. no. 29.

    Credit Line

    Anonymous gift in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Webster

    Details

    Dimensions

    55.3 x 64.7 cm (21 3/4 x 25 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1976.833

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Sewing Lesson

    1874
    Jean-François Millet (French, 1814–1875)

    Description

    Inscription

    Stamped, lower right: J. F. Millet

    Provenance

    Sold at the Millet studio sale at Hôtel Drouot, Paris, May 10-11, 1875, lot no. 55, and bought by Richard Hearn, Boston, for Martin Brimmer, Boston; 1876, given to the MFA by Martin Brimmer. (Accession Date: January 7, 1876)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Martin Brimmer

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Murphy 151

    Dimensions

    81.6 x 65.4 cm (32 1/8 x 25 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    76.1

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child

    Domenico Corvi (Italian (Roman), 1721–1803)

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1890, with Mrs. Henry Edwards, Boston, MA (on label on back of canvas); 1890, bequest of Mrs. Henry Edwards. (Accession date: April 1, 1890)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Mrs. Henry Edwards

    Details

    Dimensions

    60 x 48.5 cm (23 5/8 x 19 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    90.76

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Knitting Lesson

    about 1854
    Jean-François Millet (French, 1814–1875)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower right: J. F. Millet

    Provenance

    1854 or 1855, Martin Brimmer, Boston; 1898, inherited by Mrs. Martin Brimmer (wife); 1906, bequeathed to the MFA by Mrs. Martin Brimmer. (Accession Date: November 8, 1906)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Mrs. Martin Brimmer

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Murphy 58

    Dimensions

    47 x 38.1 cm (18 1/2 x 15 in.)

    Accession Number

    06.2423

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Reading Lesson

    1865
    Auguste Toulmouche (French, 1829–1890)

    Description

    In an elegant interior, a young mother gives her daughter a reading lesson. Though a voluminous skirt and a jacket lined with swan’s down identify her as a fashionable lady of the Second Empire, the woman seems to take even more pains with her daughter’s education than with her own appearance. Described as a “poet and historian of fashion” by his contemporaries, Toulmouche captured not only the attire of the modern parisienne but also the bourgeois domestic values of his era.

    Inscription

    Lower left, on music rack: A. T O U L M O U C H E. 1865

    Provenance

    Goupil & Co., New York. Noyes and Blakeslee, Boston, MA. By 1924, Francis A. Foster; 1924, gift of Francis A. Foster to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 3, 1924)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Francis A. Foster

    Details

    Dimensions

    36.5 x 27.6 cm (14 3/8 x 10 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    24.1

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Polly B. and Richard D. Hill Gallery (Gallery 253)

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  • At Dusk (Boston Common at Twilight)

    1885–86
    Childe Hassam (American, 1859–1935)

    Description

    Childe Hassam, the son of a Dorchester hardware merchant, had made only one trip to Europe before painting Boston Common at Twilight. He studied French art in Boston collections, and he was familiar with the popular work of painters active in Paris, like Jean Béraud and Giuseppe de Nittis, who took modern life as their main subject and frequently depicted fashionable young women in urban settings. Hassam adapted their French aesthetic to his native city and began a series of large canvases representing several of Boston’s developing neighborhoods: Back Bay, the South End, and Park Square.
    Originally an open field for cattle grazing and military parades, the Boston Common had been transformed into an oasis of elm trees and graceful promenades by the time Hassam painted it in the mid-1880s. He chose a view of the Tremont Street Mall, one of five broad tree-lined walkways that provided Boston pedestrians with an elegant alternative to the city’s noisy thoroughfares. The artist doubtless enjoyed it himself, for his studio was just across the street.

    Despite the old-fashioned charm Boston Common at Twilight presents to viewers today, in Hassam’s time this scene was distinctly modern. Once an area of elegant residential row houses, many of the streets around the Boston Common recently had been transformed into a lively business district. The red brick buildings visible at left were mostly new; the traffic of trolley cars and carriages on the road marks the bustling commerce of late afternoon; and artificial light glows from streetlights and storefronts. Hassam enhanced his impression of the fast pace of city life by using a perspective scheme in which the vertical lines of the fence, the lampposts, and the trees recede rapidly into the distance, coming closer and closer together.

    Hassam contrasted the hurried movement at left with the calm quiet of the snowy park. A stylishly dressed young mother and her child pause to feed the birds while other figures stroll through the rosy dusk. Hassam used a variety of reds to unify his composition, bringing the rusty brick buildings, the glow of the lamps, and even the brilliant end of a lit cigarette in the hand of a passerby into harmony with the sunset sky and the pinkish snow. The artist’s interest in contemporary subjects and in different kinds of light allies this painting with Impressionism, but in Hassam’s gentle vision of the city, nature humanizes the modern world.

    This text was adapted from Elliot Bostwick Davis et al., American Painting [http://www.mfashop.com/9020398034.html], MFA Highlights (Boston: MFA Publications, 2003).

    Inscription

    Lower right: [crescent] Childe Hassam/1885-6

    Provenance

    1885-86, the artist; 1887, sold at auction at Noyes, Cobb, and Co., Boston, March 9 (possibly to someone named "Daniels" as catalogue annotation suggests); possibly with a Mr. Andrews, Boston; by about 1893, to Samuel Appleton (1846-1926), Boston; 1926, by descent to his daughter, Maud E. Appleton (born 1873), Boston; 1927, lent by Maud E. Appleton to the MFA; 1931, gift of Miss Maud E. Appleton to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 3, 1931)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Miss Maud E. Appleton

    Details

    Dimensions

    106.68 x 152.4 cm (42 x 60 in.)

    Accession Number

    31.952

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Suzanne and Terrence Murray Gallery (Gallery 226)

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  • Mrs. Fiske Warren (Gretchen Osgood) and Her Daughter Rachel

    1903
    John Singer Sargent (American, 1856–1925)

    Description

    Gretchen Osgood Warren, member of a prominent Boston family and an accomplished poet, posed with her eldest daughter at Isabella Stewart Gardner’s Fenway Court in Boston (now the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum), where Sargent had set up a temporary studio. The works of art around the figures, including the intricately carved chairs and a fifteenth-century Madonna and Child (still visible in the Gardner’s Gothic Room), underscore the sitters’ refinement. Sargent emphasized the beauty and elegance of his sitters, positioning them in emulation of the Madonna and Child behind them, but their aloof expressions somewhat contradict their tender pose. Along with his sitters, Sargent’s free, confident, and expert technique is on display: note the silvery brushstrokes on Mrs. Warren’s dress and the thick slash of white, tinged with green, on the arm of the chair. The portrait’s imposing size, the Renaissance furniture, and Mrs. Warren’s formal pose evoke aristocratic portraits of the past. At the same time, Sargent’s loose painterly style is very modern. The composition would seem to illustrate a description of another Sargent portrait written by American critic Charles Caffin: both pictures feature “a lady [in the] full flavor of the modern spirit … never exceed[ing] the limits of good taste.” [1]
    Margaret (Gretchen) Osgood Warren (1871–1961) was the eldest child of Hamilton Osgood and his wife Margaret Cushing Pearmain. She spent much of her childhood abroad while her father studied surgery in Germany and later worked with Pasteur in France (on their return, Dr. Osgood introduced Pasteur’s rabies antibodies to the United States). Gretchen and her sister were educated in languages, science, art, music, and literature, and scholarly pursuits sustained her for the rest of her life. In Paris she studied singing with Gabriel Fauré and drama with Benoît-Constant Coquelin (both friends of Sargent), although she was not permitted to appear on stage or to sing professionally. In 1891 she married Fiske Warren, the youngest son of Samuel D. Warren (founder of a prosperous paper manufacturing firm). Fiske Warren was an idealist, a supporter of dress reform and the single tax, and an anti-imperialist who garnered public attention for his involvement with the political affairs of the Philippines. He went to Manila in 1901–2 and moved the family to Oxford, England, in 1904–7; upon her return Gretchen Warren was offered, and declined, academic positions at both Wellesley and Radcliffe colleges.

    During Sargent’s 1903 visit to the United States, Isabella Stewart Gardner invited him to paint at Fenway Court, the Venetian-style palace she had recently built in Boston’s Fenway neighborhood to house her art collection. Sargent made several portraits in its elaborate Gothic Room, each one reminding the viewers of the friendship between artist and collector, as well as the relationship between the historical masterpieces of the collection and the art of Sargent and his contemporaries. Although Fenway Court had opened to the public in February 1903, the Gothic Room remained off-limits. The room, on the third floor with large windows overlooking the central courtyard, provided an evocative setting for Sargent’s portraits; it was dominated by the artist’s 1888 portrait of Mrs. Gardner and was richly decorated according to her unique sensibilities with paintings, furniture, fabrics, and architectural elements.

    The Warrens’ sittings were recorded in a number of photographs (now in the collection of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum).[2] Sargent arranged Mrs. Warren and her daughter in grand Renaissance armchairs, and used an elaborate gilt candelabra and a fifteenth-century polychrome Madonna and Child as a backdrop. This sculpture inspired the unusual pose of mother and daughter: Rachel rests her head on her mother’s shoulder in imitation of the tender gesture of the Virgin and Child. The pose draws attention both to the influence of art of the past in Sargent’s work and to the intimate and informal familial relationship between the sitters. However, twelve-year-old Rachel seems to strain uncomfortably to fulfill this ideal of maternal affection; she gazes away from her mother with an abstracted expression that seems to exemplify a new stage of childhood that was gaining currency in scientific circles: adolescence.

    Gretchen Warren sits perched and conventionally pretty in a confection of pink and white satin that belonged to her sister-in-law, for Sargent refused to allow her to wear her own choice, green velvet.[3] Sargent does not seem to have known the Warrens well, despite the family’s close association with the arts. The artist was no doubt thinking of picture making and Mrs. Warren’s “great masses of golden hair”; he united his composition with bold, slashing strokes of red, pink and gold. The sophisticated, well-traveled, and educated Mrs. Warren, however—whom the Boston press described as “not only lovely to behold, but … clever and interesting” [4]—reportedly found her presentation too superficial. She often lent it, first to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in June 1903, where it was well received; as one critic wrote: “What an heirloom to hand down! There are few portraits of the English school, even by Sir Joshua Reynolds, which can be compared to this group for the note of genuineness and human tenderness which emanate from it.” [5] The painting was later lent to other exhibitions, where it enhanced Sargent’s reputation as a master of psychological portraiture and dashing technique.

    The MFA acquired the painting in 1964, thanks in part to the gift of the then-grown Rachel Warren Barton. The acquisition was hailed by the MFA’s historian, Walter Muir Whitehill, not only for Sargent’s artistry but also because of the Museum’s long-standing relationship with the Warren family: Fiske Warren’s brothers, Samuel D. Warren and Edward Perry Warren, were important collectors and patrons of the MFA.

    Notes
    1. Charles Henry Caffin, American Masters of Painting (New York: Doubleday, Page, 1902), 61–62.
    2. See Richard Ormond and Elaine Kilmurray, John Singer Sargent: The Later Portraits (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003), 102–4.
    3. Richard Ormond, John Singer Sargent: Paintings, Drawings, Watercolors (New York: Harper & Row, 1970), 63.
    4. “Current of Fiske Warren’s Life Changed by the Filipinos,” Boston Sunday Globe, December 29, 1907.
    5. “The Fine Arts. The Sargent Portraits at the Museum of Fine Arts,” Boston Transcript, June 12, 1903, n.p.

    This text was adapted from Gillian Shallcross, The MFA Handbook: A Guide to the Collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston [http://www.mfashop.com/780878467303.html], rev. ed. (Boston: MFA Publications, 2009), and Erica E. Hirshler’s entry in John Singer Sargent, ed. Elaine Kilmurray and Richard Ormond, exh. cat. (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1998).

    Inscription

    Lower left: John S. Sargent 1903

    Provenance

    1903, husband and father of the sitters, Fiske Warren, Brookline, Mass.; 1938, by descent to the sitter, Gretchen Osgood (Mrs. Fiske) Warren, Boston; 1961, by descent to the younger sitter, Rachel Warren (Mrs. Robert Childers) Barton, County Wicklow, Ireland, and her brother, Hamilton Warren, Sedona, Arizona; 1964, partial purchase and partial gift of Mrs. Rachel Warren Barton to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 13, 1964)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Rachel Warren Barton and Emily L. Ainsley Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    152.4 x 102.55 cm (60 x 40 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    64.693

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Gallery (Gallery 232)

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  • Knitting Lesson

    about 1860
    Jean-François Millet (French, 1814–1875)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower right: J. F. Millet

    Provenance

    By 1860, Narcisse-Virgile Diaz de la Peña, Paris. Quincy Adams Shaw, Boston; 1917, given to the MFA by Quincy Adams Shaw through Quincy A. Shaw, Jr. and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton. (Accession Date: March 29, 1917)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Quincy Adams Shaw through Quincy Adams Shaw, Jr., and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Murphy 81

    Dimensions

    40.4 x 31.5 cm (15 7/8 x 12 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.1504

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on panel

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • The Little Convalescent

    about 1873–79
    Eastman Johnson (American, 1824–1906)

    Description

    During the 1870s, Johnson frequently visited his sister Harriet May and her family, who spent summers on a farm in Kennebunkport, Maine. He often used Harriet’s children as models, capturing their carefree play. “The Little Convalescent” is probably a picture of Harriet reading to one of her children, who is sick in bed-his condition alluded to by the medicine bottles, thermometer, bell, and toothbrush in the background. While Harriet concentrates on the book, caring for her son’s mind as well as his body, the little boy turns to look at the artist. Johnson painted a number of pictures of children reading or writing, to suggest they would grow up to be thoughtful, responsible adults. The best known of these depicts the boy Abraham Lincoln-who would serve as United States president during the Civil War-reading by firelight. “The Little Convalescent” is also one of several tender pictures of mothers nurturing their children that Johnson was inspired to paint after the birth of his only child in 1870.
    Johnson’s fame as a genre painter rests not only on his quiet domestic scenes but also on his series of canvases depicting maple sugar production, corn husking, and cranberry harvesting. These were all quintessential New England rustic activities, and Johnson included children in most of the compositions.

    This text was adapted from Carol Troyen and Janet Comey, “Children in American Art” (Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 2007, in Japanese).

    Inscription

    Lower left: E.J-

    Provenance

    The artist; Mrs. Eastman Johnson, his wife; with Eastman Johnson Sale, American Art Association, New York, no. 12, Feb. 26-27, 1907; W.B. Cogswell, Syracuse, New York, 1907; descended to the Misses F. Pearl and Elizabeth Browning, Syracuse, his granddaughters, by 1920; with Norman Hirschl, New York; to MFA, 1940, purchased for $500.

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    32.38 x 27.94 cm (12 3/4 x 11 in.)

    Accession Number

    40.90

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on paperboard

    On View

    David and Stacey Goel Gallery (Gallery 239)

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  • Nancy Southworth Hawes and Marion Augusta Hawes

    Mrs. J. J. Hawes and Alice

    1855
    Southworth and Hawes (American, 1843–62)

    Description

    Provenance

    Edward Southworth Hawes; gift to MFA December 9, 1943.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Edward Southworth Hawes in memory of his father Josiah Johnson Hawes

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sight: 7.6 x 6.4 cm (3 x 2 1/2 in.) Framed: 29.2 x 26.6 cm (11 1/2 x 10 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    43.1421

    Medium or Technique

    Photograph, daguerreotype

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas, Photography

    Classifications

    Photographs

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  • The Barefooted Child

    about 1898
    Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: in graphite, lower right corner, inside plate: Mary Cassatt

    Signed

    Signed

    Markings

    Verso: in black ink, lower left corner: collector's stamp of Robert Hartshorne (Lugt 2215b Supp.)

    Provenance

    Robert Hartshorne; Parke Bernet Gallery; William Emerson, Cambridge, MA; by whom given to MFA; 2/14/1946

    Credit Line

    William Emerson Fund

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 160, iii/iii; Mathews & Shapiro 22, v/v

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 24.2 x 31.7 cm (9 1/2 x 12 1/2 in.) Sheet: 31.2 x 42.3 cm (12 5/16 x 16 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    46.74

    Medium or Technique

    Drypoint, soft ground etching and aquatint in color

    Not On View

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    Americas, Prints and Drawings

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  • Gathering Fruit

    about 1893
    Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: in graphte, lower center: F (in script)

    Signed

    Not signed

    Credit Line

    Bequest of W. G. Russell Allen

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 157, iv/v; Mathews & Shapiro 15, vi/xi

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 42.5 x 29.5 cm (16 3/4 x 11 5/8 in.) Sheet: 55.5 x 42.9 cm (21 7/8 x 16 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.312

    Medium or Technique

    Drypoint, soft ground etching, and aquatint in color

    Not On View

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  • Schiele's Wife with Her Little Nephew

    1915
    Egon Schiele (Austrian, 1890–1918)

    Description

    Inscription

    Verso: government stamp purple: Von der Zentralstelle für Denkmalschutz zum Ausfuhr freigegeben.

    Provenance

    Possibly acquired from the artist by Otto Benesch (b. 1896 - d. 1964), Vienna. 1964, with Marlborough Fine Art, London. 1965, William H. Schab, New York; 1965, sold by Schab to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 10, 1965)

    Credit Line

    Edwin E. Jack Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sight: 48.3 x 31.8 cm (19 x 12 1/2 in.) Framed: 70.8 x 53.7 cm (27 7/8 x 21 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.1322

    Medium or Technique

    Charcoal and opaque and transparent watercolor on paper

    Not On View

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    Europe, Prints and Drawings

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    Watercolors

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  • Venus and Cupid

    about 1779
    John Singleton Copley (American, 1738–1815)

    Description

    Provenance

    About 1779, the artist; 1815, by descent to his son, Lord Lyndhurst (1772-1863), London; March 5, 1864, Lyndhurst Sale, Christie's, London, lot 59, to Martha Babcock Amory (1812-1880), Boston, granddaughter of the artist; 1880, by descent to her daughter, Susan Greene Amory (Mrs. F. Gordon) Dexter (1840-1925), Boston; 1925, bequest of Susan Greene Dexter to the MFA. (Accession Date: March 24, 1925)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Susan Greene Dexter in memory of Charles and Martha Babcock Amory

    Details

    Dimensions

    63.5 x 51.12 cm (25 x 20 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    25.94

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas mounted on fiberboard

    On View

    Liberty Mutual Gallery (Gallery 136)

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  • Emma and Her Children

    1923
    George Wesley Bellows (American, 1882–1925)

    Description

    Although he did not exhibit with the Manhattan painters called the Eight, who showed their works together at the Macbeth Gallery, George Bellows shared their realist philosophy, ideals that had earned them the nickname “the Ashcan School.” Like them, Bellows concentrated on urban New York themes, and he painted the excavations for Pennsylvania Station, the underworld of prizefighting contests, and tenement life on the Lower East Side. Closely associated with the many of the group’s leading figures, Bellows began his formal training with Robert Henri [http://www.mfa.org/search/collections?artist=Robert%20Earle%20Henri] at the New York School of Art in 1904 and also collaborated with John Sloan [35.52] as an illustrator for the socialist magazine the Masses between 1913 and 1917.
    Emma and Her Children was painted towards the end of Bellows’s career during a productive summer he spent in Woodstock, New York, a favored art community in the Hudson River valley. The composition recalls Auguste Renoir’s large portrait of Madame Charpentier and her children (1878), which had entered the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, to great acclaim in 1907. Bellows posed his wife, Emma, and their two daughters in an elaborately conceived arrangement that evokes bourgeois respectability. In contrast to the seemingly unruffled world of Renoir, the Bellows portrait betrays anxiety. Emma recalled the tension of their portrait sittings in a letter of 1943. Although Bellows’s portrayal of her and their younger daughter Jean went very well “from the start,” she noted that it was more difficult to incorporate their twelve-year-old daughter Anne. [1] With maternal protectiveness, Emma’s arm encircles Jean, who sits unabashedly with legs askew surrounded by billowing crinolines. In contrast, Anne, on the cusp of maturity, exhibits a distinct nervousness in the pose of her hands and a sense of adolescent self-consciousness in her stiffly crossed ankles.

    In a 1923 letter to Robert Henri, Bellows described technical innovations he had developed that afforded him the same freedom while painting that he experienced in drawing. By laying out the composition in two colors at the outset, as seen in the purple and orange that dominate the study [63.261] for this portrait, Bellows achieved “the fresh first excitement” of the composition. [2] Seeking to emulate the spontaneity of Renoir and the French Impressionists and his teacher Henri, Bellows hoped to establish the essential idea of the composition in one day of painting.

    Notes
    1. Emma Bellows to Barbara N. Parker, May 28, 1943, curatorial files, Department of Art of the Americas, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
    2. George Bellows to Robert Henri, November 1923, quoted in Michael Quick et al., The Paintings of George Bellows, exh. cat. (New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1992), 84.

    This text was adapted from Elliot Bostwick Davis et al., American Painting [http://www.mfashop.com/9020398034.html], MFA Highlights (Boston: MFA Publications, 2003).

    Provenance

    1923, the artist; 1925, by inheritance, Emma (Mrs. George) Bellows, N.Y.; 1925, the Boston Art Club; 1925, partial purchase and gift of the Boston Art Club to the MFA. (Accession Date: March 24, 1925)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Subscribers and by purchase from the John Lowell Gardner Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    150.49 x 166.05 cm (59 1/4 x 65 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    25.105

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Cottage Interior

    Bernardus Johannes Blommers (Dutch, 1845–1914)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower right: Blommers

    Provenance

    By 1915, with William R. Wilson (Boston, MA, USA); 1915 - Boston, MA, USA. Boston Museum of Fine Arts (gift of Wilson) (Accession date: June 3, 1915)

    Credit Line

    William R. Wilson Donation

    Details

    Dimensions

    25.4 x 31.1 cm (10 x 12 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    15.878

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Woman Sewing beside her Sleeping Child

    about 1858–62
    Jean-François Millet (French, 1814–1875)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower right: J. F. Millet

    Provenance

    1862, with Ennemond Blanc and Alfred Stevens, Paris. Quincy Adams Shaw, Boston; 1917, given to the MFA by Quincy Adams Shaw through Quincy A. Shaw, Jr. and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton. (Accession Date: March 29, 1917)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Quincy Adams Shaw through Quincy Adams Shaw, Jr., and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Murphy 91

    Dimensions

    34 x 27.3 cm (13 3/8 x 10 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.1493

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on panel

    Not On View

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  • Children Feeding Geese

    1881
    Julien Dupré (French, 1851–1910)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower left: Julien Dupre 1881

    Provenance

    By 1881, Goupil and Cie, Paris, France; 1881, sold by Goupil and Cie to Knoedler's, London, England; 1881; sold by Knoedler's to Noyes and Blakeslee and Co., Boston, MA. By 1883, Anonymous collection; May 3, 1883, sold from this anonymous collection at Leonard and Co., Boston, (0065), and bought by W.F Johnson, Boston, MA. By 1920, with Misses Louise W. and Marian R. Case, Boston and Weston, MA; 1920, gift of Louisa W. and Marian R. Case (Accession date: February 26, 1920)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Louisa W. and Marian R. Case

    Details

    Dimensions

    81.6 x 65.1 cm (32 1/8 x 25 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    20.1865

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • The Good Mother

    ca. 1777-1779
    Jean-Honoré Fragonard (French, 1732–1806)

    Description

    Child-rearing was a much discussed topic in Enlightenment France. In 1762, philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau published Emile, or On Education, a treatise that included advice on raising morally and physically strong children. Rousseau encouraged mothers to breastfeed their children, promoted outdoor exploration, and supported the practice of good hygiene. Images of these 18th-century maternal and domestic ideals make up a substantial portion of Fragonard’s oeuvre. This particular motif of a dutiful mother about to wash the face of her young daughter is most likely an autograph copy of a painting currently in a private collection.

    Provenance

    1798, Pierre-Joseph Lafontaine, Paris; February 22, 1798, Lafontaine sale, Paillet, Paris, lot 146 [see note 1], to Aubert (possibly Ange-Joseph Aubert); by descent from Aubert to his son; April 17-18, 1806, Aubert the younger sale, Paillet, Paris, lot 12, to Alexandre-Joseph Paillet (b. 1743 - d. 1814), Paris. By 1883, Frédéric Spitzer (b. 1815 - d. 1890), Paris [see note 2]. Mme. Pellegrin; sold by Mme. Pellegrin to E. Gimpel and Wildenstein and Co., Paris and New York; 1913, sold by Gimpel and Wildenstein to Samuel Reading Bertron (b. 1865 - d. 1938), New York. By 1934, Robert Treat Paine, 2nd (b. 1861 - d. 1943), Boston [see note 3]; 1944, bequest of Robert Treat Paine, 2nd, to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 9, 1944) NOTES: [1] The existence of other paintings of the same subject by Fragonard makes tracing the early history of "The Good Mother" difficult. However, the painting of this subject in the Lafontaine sale is described as oval and measuring about 24 x 20 inches, and is probably identical to the MFA composition. Georges Wildenstein, "The Paintings of Fragonard, Complete Edition" (Phaidon, 1960), p. 299, cat. no. 451, identifies the following painting(s), all sold in Paris, which might also be identical with the MFA painting: November 12, 1810, lot 17; August 1, 1812, lot 3; January 18, 1813, lot 52; Roland sale, March 22, 1830, lot 385; d'Houdan sale, May 6-8, 1858, lot 127; December 14, 1875, lot 34. [2] He lent the painting to the exhibition "L'art au XVIIIe siècle," Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 1883-1884, cat. no. 60. [3] He first lent the painting to the MFA in 1934.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Robert Treat Paine, 2nd

    Details

    Dimensions

    65.1 x 54.0 cm (25 5/8 x 21 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    44.777

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Charles C. Cunningham Gallery (Gallery 247)

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  • Catharine Wheeler Hardy and Her Daughter

    about 1845

    Description

    Trained in Boston and New York, Jeremiah Hardy opened a studio in Bangor, Maine, in 1826. Bangor was the lumber capital of the United States in the 1830s and had many prosperous citizens who bought Hardy’s paintings. He soon became wealthy enough to purchase land on the Penobscot River, which flowed through the town, and he built a comfortable home and planted an elaborate garden there.
    In a composition adapted from the British Romantic tradition, Hardy included a luminous view of the river behind his wife and daughter in this portrait, creating a poetic atmosphere that transcends the middle-class setting. Mrs. Hardy is dressed soberly in black with a kerchief held in place by a cameo pin, while Anna Eliza wears soft white muslin. Mrs. Hardy holds pencil and paper and appears to be giving her daughter a drawing lesson. Anna Eliza also studied with her father and became an accomplished artist, painting portraits and still lifes as well as teaching many women students.
    Soft light from the window suffuses the room and creates a glow around the heads of the two figures. Anna Eliza gazes affectionately at her mother and puts her hand on her knee. Hardy’s skillful handling of light compensates for his somewhat provincial style, just as it transforms the rather plain features of his wife and daughter.

    This text was adapted from Carol Troyen and Janet Comey, “Children in American Art” (Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 2007, in Japanese).

    Provenance

    The artist; descended in family to Miss Charlotte W. Hardy, Brewer, Me. (great-niece of the artist); with Victor Spark, New York, 1944; to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I., 1944; to MFA, 1947, gift of Maxim Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Maxim Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815–1865

    Details

    Dimensions

    74.29 x 91.76 cm (29 1/4 x 36 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1146

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Deliverance Mapes Waldo and Her Son

    about 1830
    Samuel Lovett Waldo (American, 1783–1861 American)

    Description

    Inscription

    Reverse: Mrs Waldo and Son/Samuel L Waldo

    Provenance

    The artist; Albert Rosenthal, New Hope, Pa.; with Ehrich Galleries, New York; Chauncey M. Dephew, Jr.; to his estate; with Plaza Art Galleries, New York, Dec. 4, 1931, no. 45; New York art market; with Julius H. Weitzner, New York; with Victor Spark, New York, 1943; to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I., 1943; to MFA, 1945; gift of Maxim Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Maxim Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815–1865

    Details

    Dimensions

    77.15 x 64.45 cm (30 3/8 x 25 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.891

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on panel

    Not On View

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  • Rest on the Flight into Egypt

    about 1690
    Aert de Gelder (Dutch, 1645–1727)

    Description

    One of Rembrandt’s most gifted pupils, Aert de Gelder continued to work in a broad, painterly style derived from his teacher’s manner well into the eighteenth century. In this tender scene, the Holy Family is shown resting in their flight to escape Herod, the ruler of Galilee. Joseph had been warned in a dream that Herod was searching for the Christ child to kill him.

    Provenance

    18th century, possibly von Plettenberg collection, Nordkirchen Castle, Lüdinghausen, Germany; 1833, possibly by descent within the Plettenberg family to Maria von Plettenberg and her husband, Count Nikolaus-Maria Franz Esterhàzy, Nordkirchen Castle [see note 1]; until 1904, remained with the Esterhàzy family at Nordkirchen Castle; 1904, sold by the Esterhàzy family to Duke Engelbert-Marie van Arenberg (b. 1872 - d. 1949), Nordkirchen [see note 2]; until 1956, by descent within the Arenberg family, Brussels [see note 3]. 1956, possibly with Edward Speelman, London. 1957, Horace Buttery, London; 1957, sold by Buttery to the MFA for $15,000. (Accession Date: March 14, 1957) NOTES: [1] According to a letter from H. Gerson, Rijksbureau voor Kunsthistorische Documentatie, The Hague, to Angelica Rudenstine of the MFA (December 3, 1964), this painting may have belonged to the Plettenberg family as early as the 18th century. Ferdinand von Plettenberg, who died in 1737, is said to have acquired many pictures that were kept in the castle. The building and its contents were transferred to the Esterhàzy family when Maria von Plettenberg married Count von Esterhàzy in 1833. According to information provided by Horace Buttery at the time of the painting's acquisition, it was catalogued by the Esterhàzy family (no. 64); although this catalogue has not been identified, it may be the "Verzeichnis vermutlicher Autoren der Nordkirchener Bilder" of 1850. [2] Nordkirchen Castle and its contents were sold by the Esterhàzy family to Engelbert van Arenberg in 1904. This painting was lent by the Duke of Arenberg, Nordkirchen, to the Kunsthistorische Ausstellung (Düsseldorf, 1904), cat. no. 303. [3] By 1914 the painting was published as being with the Duke of Arenberg in Brussels (Karl Lilienfeld, Arent de Gelder: sein Leben und seine Kunst, 1914, p. 148, cat. no. 53).

    Credit Line

    M. Theresa B. Hopkins Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    109.9 x 118.8 cm (43 1/4 x 46 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    57.182

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

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  • Mrs. Cephas Smith, Jr. (Mary Gove) and Child

    about 1803
    William Jennys (American, 1774–1858)

    Description

    An itinerant portrait painter, William Jennys traveled throughout New England seeking commissions. In 1803, he was in Rutland, Vermont, where the prosperous attorney Cephas Smith, Jr., hired him to paint portraits of himself [1974.135] and his young wife and child. The portraits were among Jennys’s most ambitious works. Although he was known for small half-length likenesses, here he returned to a larger three-quarter-length format. These had been popular in the materialistic 1760s and 1770s because the bigger canvases allowed for the inclusion of furnishings, draperies, and other indications of wealth.

    In the related portrait of Mr. Smith, the sitter poses at his writing desk, pen in hand, demonstrating that he is a successful man of affairs. Here, his wife is shown seated in a matching chair, holding an infant in her lap—either Egbert, the Smiths’ second child, or Mary, their third. The infant holds a coral and bells, an expensive yet essential item of child-rearing equipment. The sparkling silver bells amused the baby, while the coral, parents believed, guarded against disease. In the eighteenth century, teething was considered as dangerous as diphtheria. Biting on coral would ease the discomfort of teething. Coral was also believed to have talismanic powers, warding off ailments and dangers. The rattle was thus not just a toy but a device to protect children and promote their development.

    This text was adapted from Carol Troyen and Janet L. Comey, Amerikakaigakodomo no sekai [Children in American art], exh. cat. (Nagoya, Japan: Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 2007).

    Provenance

    About 1803, Mr. Cephas Smith, Jr. (1760-1815) and Mary Gove Smith (Mrs. Cephas Smith, Jr., 1775-1831), Rutland, Vermont. By 1955, descended in the family of the sitter to Harriet Chase Benedict (Mrs. Grenville Benedict, 1903-1984), Providence, R. I.; 1974, consigned by Harriet Chase Benedict to Childs Gallery, Boston; 1974, sold by Childs Gallery to the MFA. (Accession Date: March 13, 1974)

    Credit Line

    A. Shuman Collection—Abraham Shuman Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    106.04 x 80.33 cm (41 3/4 x 31 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1974.136

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lurie-Marks Gallery (Gallery 138)

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  • Mother and Child

    1848
    Sturtevant J. Hamblin (American, 1817–1884 American)

    Description

    Inscription

    Reverse, before relining: Hamblin/East Boston/1848

    Provenance

    The artist; with A. & R. Gardiner; to Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch, 1951; to MFA, 1981, gift of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch

    Details

    Dimensions

    68.9 x 56.2 cm (27 1/8 x 22 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1981.113

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • A Street in Winter: Evening

    about 1855
    Unidentified artist, American, mid-19th century (American)

    Description

    Provenance

    The artist; private collection, New Haven, Conn.; with Victor Spark, New York, 1944; to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I., 1944; to MFA, 1947, gift of Martha C. (Mrs. Maxim) Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Martha C. Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815–1865

    Details

    Dimensions

    38.1 x 46.04 cm (15 x 18 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1216

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child

    Sassoferrato (Giovanni Battista Salvi) (Italian (Roman), 1609–1685)

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1964, Louis Agassiz Shaw, Boston, MA [see note 1]; 1991, gift of Louis Agassiz Shaw. (Accession Date: November 20, 1991) NOTES: [1] From April 1964 until 1991, this painting was on loan from Louis Agassiz Shaw to the MFA (Loan Number T.L. 12,310).

    Credit Line

    Gift of Louis Agassiz Shaw

    Details

    Dimensions

    48.3 x 38.7 cm (19 x 15 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1991.693

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite

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  • Study for Woman Feeding a Child

    1861
    Jean-François Millet (French, 1814–1875)

    Description

    Provenance

    Millet studio sale (Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 10-11 May, 1875); bought by Richard Hearn for Brimmer; Martin Brimmer (1829-1896, MA); acquired July 1876

    Credit Line

    Gift of Martin Brimmer

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Murphy 089; Delteil 17

    Dimensions

    15.4 x 12.8 cm (6 1/16 x 5 1/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    76.434

    Medium or Technique

    Black conté crayon and graphite pencil on light brown laid paper

    Not On View

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  • Woman with Two Infants

    Mother and Child

    Late 19th to early 20th century
    Paul César F. Helleu (French, 1859–1927)

    Description

    Provenance

    [Cheramy sale]; Walter Gay (1856-1937, Boston artist); acquired September 1927

    Credit Line

    Gift of Walter Gay

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 34.8 x 17.2 cm (13 11/16 x 6 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    27.503

    Medium or Technique

    Red, black and white chalk on paper

    Not On View

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  • Bridlington Quay

    1883
    Winslow Homer (American, 1836–1910)

    Description

    Inscription

    Signed and dated in gray watercolor l.r.: "HOMER 1883" over previous initials "W.H" which have been rubbed out.

    Provenance

    With Doll&Richards, Boston; Lent by Ralph W. Gray, in memory of Samuel S. Gray, March 29, 1927.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Ralph W. Gray in memory of his father, Samuel S. Gray

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 33.9 x 45.3 cm (13 3/8 x 17 13/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    44.681

    Medium or Technique

    Watercolor over graphite pencil on paper

    Not On View

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  • Charlotte Nichols Greene and her Son Stephen

    1924
    John Singer Sargent (American, 1856–1925)

    Description

    Inscription

    Signed and dated by the artist in charcoal: "John S. Sargent" (lower left) and "1924" (lower right).

    Markings

    PDP Watermark Type: MICHALLET

    Provenance

    Year-End Gift. January 21, 1987

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Stephen Greene

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 44.5 x 60.4 cm (17 1/2 x 23 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1986.970

    Medium or Technique

    Charcoal on paper

    Not On View

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  • The Father's Leave-Taking

    1879
    William Holman Hunt (English, 1827–1910)

    Description

    Provenance

    Mrs. Elizabeth Burt; N. W. Lott, Westport, CT; from whom purchased by MFA December 15, 1993.

    Credit Line

    Gift of the Print and Drawing Club

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Proof before the edition

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 18.7 x 25.1 cm (7 3/8 x 9 7/8 in.); Sheet: 33 x 46.2 cm (13 x 18 3/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    1993.878

    Medium or Technique

    Etching on cream, smooth, laid paper

    Not On View

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  • The Bath

    The Tub

    about 1891
    Artist Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: in graphite, lower left corner: 143 (in Petiet's hand); in graphite, lower center E (in Petiet's hand)

    Signed

    Not signed

    Provenance

    Henri M. Petiet, Paris; 2001 gift to MFA

    Credit Line

    Gift of Henri M. Petiet, confirmed by his estate

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 143 vi/xi; Mathews & Shapiro 05, vi/xvii

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 32 x 24.8 cm (12 5/8 x 9 3/4 in.) Sheet: 43.5 x 29.5 cm (17 1/8 x 11 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    2001.698

    Medium or Technique

    Drypoint, soft ground etching and aquatint in color

    Not On View

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  • The Bath

    The Tub

    about 1891
    Artist Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: in graphite, lower left croner: Y (in Petiet's hand) Verso: in graphite, lower left: 143

    Signed

    Not signed

    Provenance

    Henri M. Petiet, Paris; 2001 gift to MFA

    Credit Line

    Gift of Henri M. Petiet, confirmed by his estate

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 143 (state not in Breeskin); Mathews & Shapiro 05, xv/xvii

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 31.8 x 24.8 cm (12 1/2 x 9 3/4 in.) Sheet: 36.8 x 27.5 cm (14 1/2 x 10 13/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    2001.699

    Medium or Technique

    Drypoint, soft ground etching, and aquatint

    Not On View

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  • Gathering Fruit

    about 1893
    Mary Stevenson Cassatt (American, 1844–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto: in graphite, lower right, below plate: Mary Cassatt; in graphite, lower right corner: 25

    Signed

    Signed

    Markings

    Recto: in blue ink, on plateline at lower center: collector's stamp of Mary Cassatt (Lugt 604)

    Provenance

    Florence S. Gerstein (1926-2004, Boston); her bequest to MFA

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Florence S. Gerstein

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Breeskin 157, v/v; Mathews & Shapiro 15, x or xi/xi

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 42.2 x 29.8 cm (16 5/8 x 11 3/4 in.) Sheet: 50.6 x 39.6 cm (19 15/16 x 15 9/16 in.) Mount: 54.3 x 42.8 cm (21 3/8 x 16 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    2005.240

    Medium or Technique

    Drypoint, soft ground etching, and aquatint in color

    Not On View

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  • Woman Bathing a Small Boy

    Japanese
    Edo period
    about 1801 (Kansei 13/Kyôwa 1)
    Artist Kitagawa Utamaro I (Japanese, (?)–1806), Publisher Ômiya Gonkurô (Japanese)

    Description

    Signed

    Utamaro hitsu 歌麿筆

    Provenance

    Spring 1913, purchased by William S. and John T. Spaulding from Frank Lloyd Wright in Japan; December 1, 1921, given by William S. and John T. Spaulding to the Museum.

    Credit Line

    William S. and John T. Spaulding Collection

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Asano and Clark 1995, #365; Ukiyo-e shûka 3 (1978), list #313.10; Shibui, Ukiyo-e zuten Utamaro (1964), 205.3.2; Ukiyo-e taisei 7 (1931), #249

    Dimensions

    Vertical ôban; 36.7 x 26 cm (14 7/16 x 10 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    21.6439

    Medium or Technique

    Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and color on paper

    Not On View

    Collections

    Asia, Prints and Drawings

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