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MFA Images: Fruit

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  • Curved branch of litchi nuts

    Chinese
    Ming dynasty
    1633

    Description

    Provenance

    1950, J. P Dubose, Paris; sold by J. P. Dubose to Charles Adrian Rubel, Boston; gift of Charles Adrian Rubel to the MFA. (Accession Date: April 13, 1950)

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated by C. Adrian Rübel and the Asiatic Curator's Fund

    Details

    Accession Number

    50.533

    Not On View

    Collections

    Asia

    Classifications

    Books and manuscripts, Books

    More Info
  • Double branch of litchi nuts

    Chinese
    Ming dynasty
    1633

    Description

    Credit Line

    Asiatic Curator's Fund

    Details

    Accession Number

    50.646

    Not On View

    Collections

    Asia

    Classifications

    Books and manuscripts, Books

    More Info
  • Fraisier à Bouquets From P. J. Redouté, Choix des Plus Belles Fleurs.. (Paris, Panckoucke, et al...1827)

    published 1827
    After Pierre- Joseph Redouté (French, born in Flanders, 1759–1840), Chapuy (French, 19th century French)

    Place of Publication: Paris

    Description

    Provenance

    Elita R. Dike, Brookline; to her spouse George P. Dike, Brookline; bequest to MFA May 14, 1969

    Credit Line

    Bequest of George P. Dike—Elita R. Dike Collection

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Dunthorne 235, 2nd; Nissen 1591

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 27 x 21.3 cm (10 5/8 x 8 3/8 in.) Sheet: 35.6 x 25 cm (14 x 9 13/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    69.287

    Medium or Technique

    Stipple engraving, printed in color and hand-colored

    Not On View

    Collections

    Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Prints

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  • Peach tree

    1890–1920
    Unidentified artist, French, 19th century (French)

    Description

    Inscription

    Verso, in graphite, ctr: peche plein vent (?)

    Provenance

    Jose Maria Sert archive; Charles Isaacs, Malvern, PA; gift to MFA, December 2002.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Charles Isaacs and Carol Nigro

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 14.6 x 9.8 cm (5 3/4 x 3 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    2002.874

    Medium or Technique

    Photograph, albumen print

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe, Photography

    Classifications

    Photographs

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  • Description

    Inscription

    Recto, in black ink, l.r.: Orangier/ No 193 / TS or ST Recto, stamped in purple ink, l.r.: copyright reproduction interdite

    Provenance

    Jose Maria Sert archive; Charles Isaacs, Malvern, PA; gift to MFA, December 2002.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Charles Isaacs and Carol Nigro

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 22.9 x 29.2 cm (9 xx 11 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    2002.870

    Medium or Technique

    Photograph, albumen print

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe, Photography

    Classifications

    Photographs

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  • Oranges

    Japanese
    Late Meiji era
    cancelled 1905
    Artist Unknown, Japanese

    Place of Creation: Japan

    Description

    Provenance

    ex. Jaeger Collection Leonard A. Lauder Collection, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Fractional gift of Lauder (Accession date: March 20, 2002).

    Credit Line

    Leonard A. Lauder Collection of Japanese Postcards

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 8.8 x 13.8 cm (3 7/16 x 5 7/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    2002.18684

    Medium or Technique

    Color lithograph; ink on card stock

    Not On View

    Collections

    Asia, Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Postcards

    More Info
  • Four oranges on a leafy branch

    Chinese
    Yuan dynasty
    13th–14th century

    Description

    Signed

    Ku yuan

    Provenance

    1913, with a Mr. Re, China; October 5, 1913, sold by Mr. Re to Koichi Hayasaki (b. 1874 - d. 1956) and taken to Japan [see note 1]; December, 1913, shipped to Boston and purchased by the MFA. (Accession Date: January 8, 1914) NOTES: [1] Koichi Hayasaki served as the MFA's purchasing agent in China.

    Credit Line

    Special Chinese and Japanese Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    22.9 x 22.9 cm (9 x 9 in.)

    Accession Number

    14.66

    Medium or Technique

    Ink and color on silk

    Not On View

    Collections

    Asia

    Classifications

    Paintings

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  • Orange, grapes and pomegranates

    Chinese
    Southern Song dynasty
    13th century
    Lu Zonggui (Chinese, 13th century Chinese)

    Description

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Charles Bain Hoyt—Charles Bain Hoyt Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    24 x 25.8 cm (9 7/16 x 10 3/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    50.1454

    Medium or Technique

    Ink and color on silk

    Not On View

    Collections

    Asia

    Classifications

    Paintings

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  • Papaya (Fructu oblongo melonis effigie)

    Papaya (Fructu oblongo melonis effigie) (Tab.VII from Christopher Jacob Trew, "Plantae Selectae...", Nuremberg, 1750–73)

    published 1750–73
    After Georg Dionysus Ehret (German, 1708–1770 German), Johann Jacob Haid (German, 1704–1767 German), Or J. E. Haid

    Place of Publication: Nuremberg

    Description

    Provenance

    Elita R. Dike, Brookline; to her spouse George P. Dike, Brookline; bequest to MFA May 14, 1969

    Credit Line

    Bequest of George P. Dike—Elita R. Dike Collection

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Dunthorne 309; Nissen 1997

    Dimensions

    Platemark: 43 x 28.6 cm (16 15/16 x 11 1/4 in.) Sheet: 52 x 34.2 cm (20 1/2 x 13 7/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    69.187

    Medium or Technique

    Hand-colored engraving

    Not On View

    Collections

    Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Prints

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  • A Lunch

    1876
    William Michael Harnett (American (born in Ireland), 1848–1892 American)

    Description

    Provenance

    The artist; private collection; with Sotheby's, November 30, 1989, lot 6 (as "Still Life with Raisincake, Fruit and Wine"); to private collection, Hillsborough, North Carolina; with Sotheby's, Dec.1, 1994 lot 136 (as "Still Life with Raisincake, Fruit and Wine"); to private collection, Houston; with Michael Altman, New York (as "Spanish Souvenirs"); to MFA, 1999, purchase.

    Credit Line

    Charles H. Bayley Picture and Painting Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    51.18 x 41.02 cm (20 1/8 x 16 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1999.257

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Embroidered picture

    American
    early 19th century
    Attributed to Elizabeth Derby West (American, 1762–1814)

    Object Place: Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States

    Description

    Whilte satin ground embroidered with basket of fruit and a bird in polychrome silk; octagonal wood frame

    Provenance

    Karolik Collection, gift to MFA, 1939.

    Credit Line

    The M. and M. Karolik Collection of Eighteenth-Century American Arts

    Details

    Dimensions

    52.5 x 48.5 x 3 cm (20 11/16 x 19 1/8 x 1 3/16 in.) Including frame

    Accession Number

    39.245

    Medium or Technique

    Silk satin embroidered with silk

    On View

    C. Kevin and G. Barrie Landry Gallery (Gallery 126)

    Collections

    Americas, Textiles and Fashion Arts

    Classifications

    Textiles

    More Info
  • Pear, Buerre Superfine

    1895–1910
    Charles Jones (English, 1866–1959)

    Description

    Inscription

    Verso, in pencil, ctr: Pear / Buerre / Superfine / C.J.

    Provenance

    ex coll: Sean Sexton; Davis & Langdale Company, Inc., New York; lent to Nielsen Gallery, 2004; purchased by MFA, Dec. 18, 2002.

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated by John and Olivia Parker

    Copyright

    Reproduced with permission.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Image: 10.8 x 15.2 cm (4 1/4 x 6 in.)

    Accession Number

    2004.2186

    Medium or Technique

    Photograph, gold-toned gelatin silver print

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe, Photography

    Classifications

    Photographs

    More Info
  • Flowers from Shakespeare's Garden: A Posy from the Plays

    1906
    Illustrated by Walter Crane (English, 1845–1915), Author William Shakespeare (English, 1564–1616), Printer and Publisher Cassell & Co.

    Place of Publication: London, England

    Description

    London: Cassell & Co., 1906

    Provenance

    W. G. Russell Allen, Boston (1882-1955), by whom bequeathed to MFA, June 19, 1963.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of W. G. Russell Allen

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 25.4 x 19.1 x 1.3 cm (10 x 7 1/2 x 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.731

    Medium or Technique

    Illustrated book with color offset lithographs

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe, Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Illustrated Books

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  • Description

    Inscription

    Recto, in black ink, l.l.: Citronnier / No 191 / TS or ST Recto, stamped in purple ink, l.l.: copyright reproduction interdite

    Provenance

    Jose Maria Sert archive; Charles Isaacs, Malvern, PA; gift to MFA, December 2002.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Charles Isaacs and Carol Nigro

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 22.9 x 29.2 cm (9 x 11 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    2002.869

    Medium or Technique

    Photograph, albumen print

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe, Photography

    Classifications

    Photographs

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  • Malaga Grape

    1890–1920
    Unidentified artist "TS" or "ST"; French, 19th century (French)

    Description

    Inscription

    Recto, in black ink, bottom ctr: Raisin / Malaga / No 609.5 / Malaga / TS or ST

    Provenance

    Jose Maria Sert archive; Charles Isaacs, Malvern, PA; gift to MFA, December 2002.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Charles Isaacs and Carol Nigro

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 28.6 x 22.5 cm (11 1/4 x 8 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    2002.868

    Medium or Technique

    Photograph, albumen print

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe, Photography

    Classifications

    Photographs

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  • Peaches in a Bowl

    about 1925
    Charles Sheeler (American, 1883–1965)

    Description

    Still-life painting was of such importance to Sheeler that he wrote an essay on the subject in about 1925 (unpublished, Forbes Watson Papers, Archives of American Art, Reel D56: 1094). In this essay, Sheeler made clear his admiration of Paul Cézanne, whose work he had seen during a trip to Europe in 1908-09 and subsequently in New York City. He realized that Cézanne’s “selection [of objects] is based upon preference in the matter of shapes, surfaces, and quantities related to a geometric structure,” and attempted to develop a similar underlying structure in his own work. Sheeler, like Cézanne, favored the genre because he could control the content, layout, and lighting in the pictures. He began making tabletop still lifes as early as 1910, but the mid-1920s were a particularly productive period for him. Sheeler’s compositions usually included either fruit or flowers, often arranged in his growing collection of early American glassware and pottery. As Troyen and Hirshler remark, most of Sheeler’s pictures of this type are “plain - the flowers were never exotic species, the glassware and furnishings were distinguished by their proportions rather than by surface embellishments - and he rendered them in an understated, self-effacing way” (Carol Troyen and Erica E. Hirshler, “Charles Sheeler: Paintings and Drawings,” Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1987, p. 106).

    “Peaches in a Bowl” is deceptively simple; it portrays two pieces of fruit in a glass compote on a table. Sheeler painted the arrangement as if he were photographing it from above, using a tightly framed, close-up view, which has the effect of tilting up the surface and making his subject seem powerfully immediate. There is subtle tension in the composition. The blue table does not form the anticipated straight line across the background of the picture; the left edge is inexplicably lower than the right. The compote is off-center and cropped on the right. The fruit occupies the left side of the glass container, and together with the shadow, has the effect of making the upper left portion of the picture dense compared with the emptiness in the lower right. This serves to undermine our expectation that the still-life will have a solid base.

    The off-center placement of the compote and its contents may derive from Sheeler’s study of Cézanne’s paintings, which often reveal asymmetric compositions [see 48.524]. Equally Cézannesque are the juxtaposition of chromatic opposites - the yellow-orange fruit against the intensely blue table; the broad, parallel brushstrokes that define the peaches; and the sense of the subject as a vignette removed from its context. The geometric shapes - spheres, circles and squares - of the peaches and compote, and the tension between realism and abstraction, invigorate Sheeler’s rendering just as they energized the still lifes of the artist he so admired.

    Janet Comey

    Provenance

    The artist; Morton R. Goldsmith, Scarsdale, N. Y. to 1936; Jaap Vandenbergh, North Andover, Mass.; after his death in 1958, by inheritance to his widow, Eva Louise Vandenbergh, who later became Mrs. Ezra Merrill, Mass.; to her estate, 1988; to MFA, 1997, gift of the estate of Eva Louise (Vandenbergh) Merrill.

    Credit Line

    Gift of the Estate of Eva Louise Merrill

    Details

    Dimensions

    25.08 x 20.32 cm (9 7/8 x 8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1997.130

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Fruit and a Jug on a Table

    1916
    Jean Metzinger (French, 1883–1956)

    Description

    Metzinger was an early adopter of Cubism. Less radical than Picasso and Braque, he tempered geometric abstraction in his pictures with a stylish art-deco design sensibility. The objects he depicted tend to retain recognizable forms, as we see here in the rounded fruits, the liquor bottle with its legible label, the wineglass and pitcher. His paintings quickly found an appreciative audience in Paris and were widely collected in the 1920s and 1930s.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Metzinger Reverse: Peint par moi / en 1916 / Metzinger

    Provenance

    April 1919, with Léonce Rosenberg (b. 1877 - d. 1947), Galerie de l'Effort Moderne, Paris [see note 1]. By 1955, art market, Paris; by 1955, sold by an unknown dealer, Paris, to Marlborough Fine Art, Ltd., London [see note 2 ]; 1957, sold by Marlborough Fine Art to the MFA for £1,200. (Accession Date: January 10, 1957) NOTES: [1] A fragmentary label on the reverse, dated April 1919, bears the name of Léonce Rosenberg and the Galerie de l'Effort Moderne, which Rosenberg founded in 1918. A collector of contemporary French art, Rosenberg had signed a contract with Metzinger in 1916: in exchange for a monthly stipend the dealer was granted the exclusive rights to Metzinger's artistic production. [2] This information comes from a letter from Marlborough Fine Art to W. G. Constable of the MFA (January 22, 1957), in the MFA curatorial file.

    Credit Line

    Fanny P. Mason Fund in memory of Alice Thevin

    Copyright

    © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 115.9 x 81cm (45 5/8 x 31 7/8in.) Framed: 148 x 113 x 7 cm (58 1/4 x 44 1/2 x 2 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    57.3

    Medium or Technique

    Oil and sand on canvas

    On View

    Charlotte F. and Irving W. Rabb Gallery (Gallery 155)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

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  • Basket of Flowers and Fruits

    1770–1822
    After Gerard van Spaendonck (Dutch, active in France, 1746–1822 Dutch), Formerly attributed to Cornelis van Spaendonck (Dutch (active in France), 1756–1840 Dutch (active in France))

    Description

    Inscription

    Signed, l. r.: Gerard Van Spaendonck

    Provenance

    Mrs. Sigmund J. Katz, New Orleans; acquired by bequest November 1988

    Credit Line

    Jessie and Sigmund Katz Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 53.6 x 42.3 cm (21 1/8 x 16 5/8 in. )

    Accession Number

    1988.506

    Medium or Technique

    Watercolor

    Not On View

    Collections

    Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Watercolors

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  • Branch of apples (?)

    Chinese
    Ming dynasty
    1633

    Description

    Credit Line

    Asiatic Curator's Fund

    Details

    Accession Number

    50.641

    Not On View

    Collections

    Asia

    Classifications

    Books and manuscripts, Books

    More Info
  • Love Apples

    about 1910–13
    Edna Boies Hopkins (American, 1872–1937 American)

    Description

    Inscription

    In graphite, l.l.: Edna Boies Hopkins; l.r.: Love Apples

    Provenance

    John T. Spaulding (1870-1948) Boston; by whom given to MFA by bequest June 3, 1948

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Vasseur 43

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 36.7 x 28.6 cm (14 7/16 x 11 1/4 in.) Block: 27.7 x 18.6 cm (10 7/8 x 7 5/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.892

    Medium or Technique

    Color woodcut

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas, Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Prints

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  • Fruit Displayed on a Stand

    about 1881–82
    Gustave Caillebotte (French, 1848–1894)

    Description

    Caillebotte delighted in unusual vantage points and compositions. This close-up view of fruit stacked on a market stand creates a bold pattern of repeated forms and colors, while the sensuous brushstrokes suggest the lusciousness of the fruit. A loyal and well-to-do member of the Impressionist group, Caillebotte bequeathed his extensive painting collection to the state. It became the nucleus of the Impressionist collection now in the Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

    Inscription

    Lower right: G. Caillebotte

    Provenance

    About 1881-1882, executed for Albert Courtier, Meaux [see note 1]; by descent from Courtier to Mme. Brunet, Paris [see note 2]; by descent from Mme. Brunet to a private collection, Paris; March 22, 1979, sale of private collector, Palais d'Orsay, Paris, lot 71, to Wildenstein and Co., New York, for the MFA. (Accession Date: May 16, 1979) NOTES: [1] Courtier was a notary at Meaux and friend of Caillebotte; the painting was intended for his dining room. See Marie Berhaut, "Caillebotte: sa vie et son oeuvre" (Paris, 1978), cat. no. 178. [2] The provenance is taken from notes in the MFA curatorial file.

    Credit Line

    Fanny P. Mason Fund in memory of Alice Thevin

    Details

    Dimensions

    76.5 x 100.6 cm (30 1/8 x 39 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1979.196

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Sidney and Esther Rabb Gallery (Gallery 255)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

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  • Pomona Britannica; or, A Collection of the Most Esteemed Fruits at Present Cultivated in this Country

    1812
    After George Brookshaw (English, 1751–1823 English), Possibly by Richard Brookshaw (English, 1736–about 1804 English), Printer Thomas Bensley (English, about 1760–1835)

    Place of Publication: London, England

    Description

    London: T. Bensley, for the author [et al.], 1812

    Provenance

    Mrs. Sigmund J. Katz, New Orleans, by whom bequeathed to MFA, November 30, 1988.

    Credit Line

    Jessie and Sigmund Katz Collection

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Dunthorne 050; Nissen 244

    Dimensions

    Each sheet: 57.5 x 46.5 cm (22 5/8 x 18 5/16 in.) Book (closed): 59.1 x 48.3 x 5.1cm (23 1/4 x 19 x 2in.)

    Accession Number

    1988.527

    Medium or Technique

    Illustrated book with 90 hand-colored aquatints

    Not On View

    Collections

    Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Illustrated Books

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  • Still Life with Teapot, Grapes, Chestnuts, and a Pear

    17[64?]
    Jean Siméon Chardin (French, 1699–1779)

    Description

    Chardin celebrated the commonplace. His still lifes feature an air of informality and intimacy, as if he were working in his kitchen rather than his studio. In fact, inventories reveal that he owned most of the objects that he painted so meticulously, balancing form and texture. He also loved the pure, sensuous quality of paint, as the patch of brilliant orange brushed on the pear attests. The critic Denis Diderot enthused: “O Chardin! It’s not white, red, or black pigment that you crush on your palette: it’s the very substance of the objects, it’s air and light that you take up with the tip of your brush and fix onto the canvas.”

    Inscription

    Lower left: Chardin / 17 [64?]

    Provenance

    By 1878, M. Signol collection; April 1-3, 1878, Signol sale, Hotel Drouot, Paris, lot 45. Étienne-Edmond-Martin, Baron de Beurnonville (b. 1825 - d. 1906), Paris; May 21-22, 1883, Beurnonville sale, Hotel Drouot, Paris, lot 7, to Martin Brimmer (b. 1829 - d. 1896) and Marianne Timmins Brimmer (b. 1827 - d. 1906), Boston, for 1250 ff; 1883, gift of Martin Brimmer to the MFA. (Accession Date: October 9, 1883)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Martin Brimmer

    Details

    Dimensions

    32.1 x 40 cm (12 5/8 x 15 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    83.177

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Robert and Ruth Remis Gallery (Gallery 244)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Vegetables and a Basket of Fruit on a Table

    Attributed to Frans Snyders (Flemish, 1579–1657)

    Description

    Provenance

    1880, Paul Pavlovich Demidoff, 2nd Prince of San Donato (b. 1839 - d. 1885), Florence; March 15 - April 10, 1880, Demidoff sale, San Donato Palace, lot 1050 [see note 1], to Stanton Blake (b. 1837 - d. 1889), Boston; 1889, purchased under the will of Stanton Blake by the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1889) NOTES: [1] Attributed in the auction catalogue to Willem Kalf.

    Credit Line

    Sidney Bartlett Bequest

    Details

    Dimensions

    83.8 x 95.9 cm (33 x 37 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    89.499

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Fruit and a Wineglass

    Antoine Vollon (French, 1833–1900)

    Description

    Although his work was neglected for many years after his death, Vollon was a critical and commercial success in his lifetime and won many official honors. He painted figures, animals, and landscapes, but earned his reputation and his living from still life. Contemporary writers often cite Vollon’s work for its realism and truthfulness, which are evident here in the careful attention paid to shapes, colors, and textures.

    Inscription

    Lower right: A Vollon

    Provenance

    By 1917, Alice Crowninshield (Mrs. Josiah) Bradlee (b. 1839 - d. 1926), Boston; 1917, gift of Mrs. Josiah Bradlee to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 6, 1917)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Josiah Bradlee

    Details

    Dimensions

    25.7 x 40.0 cm (10 1/8 x 15 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.3144

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Still Life with Melon and Pears

    about 1772
    Luis Meléndez (Spanish, 1716–1780)

    Description

    Meléndez favored arrangements of everyday objects painted with sober yet sensuous realism. He savored shapes, surfaces, and colors—from the webbed rind of the melon to the glint of a wine bottle cooling in a cork bucket—and despite the profusion of objects, his paintings convey a satisfying sense of balance and measure. This still life may be from a series of forty-five, said to represent “every species of food produced in Spain,” that Meléndez created for the king’s summer residence outside Madrid. Ironically, many were painted at a time when poor harvests had produced severe food shortages. The artist himself had no money to buy food, claiming that his brush was his only asset.

    Inscription

    Lower right, on edge of table: EG L M D. S. P.

    Provenance

    R.F. Ratcliff, England [see note 1]. Possibly Mrs. Olga Bode Matthiesen [see note 2]. By 1938, Matthiesen Ltd., London; 1939, sold by Matthiesen to the MFA for $300. (Accession Date: February 9, 1939) NOTES: [1] Eleanor Tufts, "Luis Meléndez: Eighteenth-Century master of the Spanish Still Life with a Catalogue Raisonné (Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 1985), 92-93, cat. no. 59. [2] According to information provided by the Matthiesen Gallery (December 1, 2005).

    Credit Line

    Margaret Curry Wyman Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    63.8 x 85.1 cm (25 1/8 x 33 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    39.41

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    European Painting Gallery (Gallery 249)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Still Life with Fruit in a Bowl

    1850s–60s
    Unidentified artist, American, mid-19th century (American)

    Description

    Provenance

    The artist; to private collection, Philadelphia; descended in the family; with Carl Lindborg, Newtown Square, Penn., 1942; to MFA, 1942, purchased for $400.

    Credit Line

    Ellen Kelleran Gardner Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    56.83 x 69.53 cm (22 3/8 x 27 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    42.116

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas

    Classifications

    Paintings

    More Info
  • Grapes, Peaches and Quinces in a Niche

    Frans Snyders (Flemish, 1579–1657)

    Description

    Snyders painted many different kinds of still-life subjects, from large kitchen pieces to intimate representations of flowers. Some of his compositions are complex and dynamic; others, such as this one, are more focused and quiet. His brushwork, too, is sometimes precise and barely perceptible, sometimes more fluid, or, as here, almost sketchy. The low viewpoint of this painting, emphasized by the shadow of the box that overlaps the edge of the niche, suggests that it was intended to be hung high, perhaps over a door.

    Provenance

    1946, A. F. Mondschein (Frederick Mont), New York; 1946, sold by Mondschein to the MFA for $1250. (Accession Date: February 14, 1946)

    Credit Line

    Charles Edward French Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    75.2 x 54.3 cm (29 5/8 x 21 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    46.59

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on panel

    On View

    Thomas Jefferson Coolidge III Gallery (Gallery 248)

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  • Still Life with Apples and Chestnuts

    1859
    John F. Francis (American, 1808–1886 American)

    Description

    From the time of James Peale’s death in 1831 until the mid-century, few Americans painted still lifes. John Francis was one of a small number of American artists who came to prominence for his work in the genre at this time. He initially earned his living as an itinerant portrait painter whose business took him to rural Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Tennessee, and he exhibited works at the Artist’s Fund Society in 1840 and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia where he was listed as a resident. Several factors probably influenced his decision to give up portraiture in the early 1850s to focus on still lifes: the market for such works, a product of rising incomes and higher standards of living, and the promise of a sedentary lifestyle. Moreover, still life, unlike portraiture, eliminated the possibility of demanding sitters.
    Francis’s still lifes fall into three categories: luncheon pictures, dessert images, and canvases, like the present one, which feature large market baskets filled with fruit. Unlike the refined prepared foods and opulent vessels of the luncheon and dessert pictures which suggest a special occasion or an upper-class meal, the common rustic basket and the abundance of newly picked fruit of the third category of pictures evoke images of nature and the countryside’s orchards and fields. The image, however, does not lead the viewer to contemplate the process of and labor involved in growing, harvesting, and selling food. Instead, the cut apple, knife, and glasses of cider seem the makings of an impromptu meal, one that takes place perhaps during an afternoon excursion in the country.
    The Boston canvas derives from “Still Life with Yellow Apples” (Detroit Institute of Arts) which Francis painted in 1858. Save for the addition of two walnuts to the left of the knife in the Boston canvas, the two pictures are virtually identical. Both works were preceded by smaller, simpler images of apple-filled baskets. As he does in the present work, Francis often depicted his fruit with brown spots and worm holes. But the associations of disease and decay that those features might suggest in other still lifes are negated by the abundance of food, the sunny palette, and ordered arrangement, all of which combine to evoke visions of plenitude and well-being and fantasies of a simple, uncomplicated rural existence. It is easy to imagine this work hanging in the dining room of a well-appointed urban house.

    This text was adapted from Karyn Esielonis, et al, “Still-Life Painting in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston” (Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, 1994).

    Inscription

    Lower left: J.F. Francis Pt 1859

    Provenance

    The artist; private collection, Philadelphia; with Victor Spark, New York, 1944; to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I., 1944; to MFA, 1947, gift of Martha C. (Mrs. Maxim) Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Maxim Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815–1865

    Details

    Dimensions

    63.5 x 76.52 cm (25 x 30 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1145

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • The Delft Plate

    1888
    Julian Alden Weir (American, 1852–1919)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower left: J. Alden Weir/1888; Reverse: Alden Weir

    Provenance

    The artist; Smith College Museum, Northampton, Mass., probably before 1911; with Gimbel Bros., New York, 1946; with Knoedler, New York, 1947; to MFA, 1947, purchased for $1,200.

    Credit Line

    A. Shuman Collection—Abraham Shuman Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    56.2 x 34.61 cm (22 1/8 x 13 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1289

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on panel

    Not On View

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  • Watermelon

    about 1855
    Unidentified artist, American, mid-19th century (American)

    Description

    In the mid-nineteenth century, folk painting, the problematic term commonly used to denote works by unschooled or little-trained professionals, found a committed clientele in the lower- to upper-middle classes - tradesmen, merchants, doctors, and lawyers eager to decorate their houses with pictures that provided permanent records of the people they knew, objects they used, and places they lived. Though they were less expensive than canvases by trained artists, folk paintings nonetheless served as tangible evidence of their owners’ economic well-being.
    In this painting the awkward attempt to model forms, to develop space three-dimensionally, and to imitate the colors and textures of the various objects indicate that its painter, who is unknown, was aware of but little practiced in the academic methods basic to American artistic training in the nineteenth century. At the same time the clumsy negotiation of the table, oddly shaped plate, and watermelon as well as the skewed table top contribute to the work’s charm. Though the artist did not deliberately intend them, the distortions in the space of the picture and shapes of the objects also give the work a peculiarly modern appeal. Those distortions, which are typical of folk art generally, explain in part the revival of interest in studying, collecting, and exhibiting this art beginning in the 1920s when aesthetic sensibilities shaped by exposure to the works of Cezanne and other Post-Impressionist and Cubist artists were receptive to the folk painter’s stark, direct style. Paradoxically the current popularity of folk paintings has put them beyond the financial reach of the very kinds of people for whom they were originally made.
    Although European still lifes rarely feature watermelons, they were common in both folk and fine art in the United States. They were, for example, a favored fruit among members of the Peale family, appearing in still lifes by Raphaelle and James Peale as well as pictures by Margaretta Angelica Peale and Sarah Miriam Peale. The watermelon’s desirability as a still-life object was two-fold. With its mottled green rind, pink flesh, and dark brown seeds, it offered the painter a variety of colors and textures. Moreover, water melon was a popular American food. The seeds of the watermelon, which originated in Africa, were brought to the United States by slave traders as well as slaves and cultivated throughout the country. Although derogatory associations between African-Americans and watermelons became commonplace in the later decades of the nineteenth century, they were rare at the time this still life was painted. The watermelon, instead, was consumed by members of all classes during the summer when its cool, wet pulp proved most refreshing. In addition to eating the watermelon flesh, people pickled the rind, particularly in New England, and boiled the fruit to make sugar and molasses.

    This text was adapted from Karyn Esielonis, et al, “Still-Life Painting in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston” (Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, 1994).

    Provenance

    The artist; with Victor Spark, New York, 1947; to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I., 1947; to MFA, 1948, gift of Maxim Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Maxim Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815–1865

    Details

    Dimensions

    56.2 x 69.53 cm (22 1/8 x 27 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.410

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

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  • Watermelon and Fruit

    1850s
    Unidentified artist, American, mid-19th century (American)

    Description

    Provenance

    The artist; private collection, East Hampton, NY; with John Levy, New York, 1943; to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I., 1943; to MFA, 1948, bequest of Martha C. (Mrs. Maxim) Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Martha C. Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815-1865

    Details

    Dimensions

    42.86 x 53.34 cm (16 7/8 x 21 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.463

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Basket of Fruit

    1860
    Rubens Peale (American, 1784–1865 American)

    Description

    Although Rubens Peale, the fourth son of Charles Willson Peale, was born into a family of artists, he did not begin painting until the last ten years of his life. Because of deficient eyesight, he had not learned to paint with his siblings but had instead devoted his life to directing museums, including his father’s, and then had retired to a farm. His interest in horticulture was recorded in an early portrait, “Rubens Peale with a Geranium” by his brother Rembrandt (1801, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.) When he took up the brush at age seventy-one, his botanical interests led him to concentrate on “fruit pieces.” Lacking a formal artistic education, Peale learned to compose pictures by making copies of other artists’ canvases, especially those by his uncle James and brother Raphaelle. “Basket of Fruit,”an original conception, nevertheless shows the influence of Raphaelle Peale in its austerity.

    With Neoclassical restraint, Peale arranged the basket on a shiny table against a plain background. He depicted the strongly-illuminated fruit with botanical accuracy, capturing the white bloom on the grapes and the variegated coloring of the apples. Peale mitigated the static quality of his composition by situating the basket with its slightly tilted handle to the left of center and balancing it with the apple on the table. “Basket of Fruit” is recorded in Peale’s painter’s register: “49. Fruit. Basket of apples with grapes, “for my niece Anna Sellers.” Com[menced] Oct. 22, 1860. Varnished Dec. 19, 1860.” After giving the painting to his niece, the seventy-six year old artist wrote in his journal, “I got a letter this evening from Anna Sellers thanking me for the Christmas present of the fruit piece which I painted for her, her brothers are all pleased with it. They are surprised that I could paint so good a picture at my time of life.”

    Janet Comey

    Inscription

    Lower right, on table edge: Rubens Peale

    Provenance

    The artist; New York auction; with Albert Duveen, New York; with Arnold Seligmann, Rey, & Co., New York, 1943; to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I.; to MFA, 1948, gift of Martha C. (Mrs. Maxim) Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Martha C. Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815-1865

    Details

    Dimensions

    35.56 x 55.88 cm (14 x 22 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.464

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Apples

    1867
    Thomas Worthington Whittredge (American, 1820–1910 American)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower right: W. Whittredge/1867

    Provenance

    1867, the artist's cousin, John Cushing Whittredge (1819-1910), Baltimore; descended in the Whittredge family. With Plaza Art Galleries, New York; 1945, with A. Frederick Mondschein, New York; 1945, sold by A. Frederick Mondschein to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I.; 1948, bequest of Martha C. (Mrs. Maxim) Karolik to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 3, 1948)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Martha C. Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815–1865

    Details

    Dimensions

    38.73 x 30.8 cm (15 1/4 x 12 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.490

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

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  • Fruit and a Jug on a Table

    about 1890–94
    Paul Cézanne (French, 1839–1906)

    Description

    Cézanne’s deceptively simple still lifes of fruit on sloping tabletops are among his most iconic pictures, each one an exploration of space, form, and the painter’s means of representing them. A slow worker, Cézanne once explained his attraction to fruit in more practical terms: “As to flowers, I have given them up. They wilt immediately. Fruits are more reliable.”

    Provenance

    1895, Ambroise Vollard (b. 1867 - d. 1939), Paris; November 26, 1895, sold by Vollard to Eugène Blot (b. 1857), Paris [see note 1]; May 9-10, 1900, Blot sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 22, not sold; May 10, 1906, Blot sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 19, not sold; 1909, still with Blot [see note 2]. Paul Rosenberg, Paris. By 1913, Gottlieb Friedrich Reber (b. 1880 - d. 1959), Lausanne [see note 3]. 1922, Hans Wendland, Paris [see note 4]; February 24, 1922, Wendland liquidation sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 221, to Durand-Ruel, Paris; transferred to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 4744); May 10, 1922, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to John Taylor Spaulding (b. 1870 - d. 1948), Boston; 1948, bequest of John Taylor Spaulding to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 3, 1948) NOTES: [1] See John Rewald, "The Paintings of Paul Cézanne: a Catalogue Raisonné" (New York, 1996), vol. 1, p. 456, cat. no. 741 and Rebecca A. Rabinow, ed., Cézanne to Picasso: Ambroise Vollard, Patron of the Avant-Garde (exh. cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 2006), p. 47, n. 88. In his memoirs, Blot claimed that he bought it from Vollard in 1892, which is not possible according to Rewald, who dates the painting to 1893/95. [2] Included in the exhibition "Natures mortes et fleurs," Galerie Blot, Paris, 1909, no. 4. [3] Included in the exhibitions of Reber's collection at Paul Cassirer, Berlin and Mathildenhöhe, Darmstadt, in 1913. [4] Wendland was a German art dealer living in Paris at the outbreak of WWI. His collection was confiscated by French authorities and sold in three auctions during the 1920s.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Dimensions

    32.4 x 40.6 cm (12 3/4 x 16 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.524

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Sidney and Esther Rabb Gallery (Gallery 255)

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  • Goblet and Fruit

    18th or 19th century
    Follower of Jean Siméon Chardin (French, 1699–1779)

    Description

    Provenance

    Marquis de Biron, Paris. By 1926, Wildenstein & Co., New York [see note 1]. 1926, sold by Wildenstein to John Taylor Spaulding, Boston (d. 1948); 1948, bequest of Spaulding. (Accession Date: June 3, 1948) NOTES: [1] on display in "Exhibition of Paintings by Chardin, 1699-1779," Wildenstein Galleries, New York, 1926, no. 13

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Dimensions

    33 x 45.4 cm (13 x 17 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.526

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Flowers and a Bowl of Fruit on a Table

    1894
    Paul Gauguin (French, 1848–1903)

    Description

    Provenance

    1894, sold by the artist in Pont-Aven to Gustave Loiseau, Paris; October 6, 1922, sold by Loiseau to Durand-Ruel, Paris; 1922, sold by Durand-Ruel to John Taylor Spaulding, Boston, MA; 1948, bequest of Spaulding. (Accession date: June 3, 1948)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Dimensions

    43.2 x 62.9 cm (17 x 24 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.546

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas mounted on paperboard

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  • Flowers and Fruit on a Table

    1865
    Henri Fantin-Latour (French, 1836–1904)

    Description

    Friend to Manet and the Impressionists, but an artist with his own individual style, Fantin-Latour made a specialty of flower pieces. They found a lucrative market, particularly in England, at a time when still-life painting was attracting renewed interest and respect.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Fantin - 1865.

    Provenance

    Ch. L. de Hèle, Brussels; June 13, 1911, posthumous Hèle sale, Frederik Muller, Amsterdam, lot 3, sold for 9,680 fl. Julien Tempelaere (b. 1876 - d. 1961), Paris; probably sold by Tempelaere to Alexander Reid (b. 1854 - d. 1928), Glasgow [see note 1]; by 1932, probably sold by Reid to David W. T. Cargill (b. 1872 - d. 1939), Glasgow; about 1939/1940, probably sold to Reid and Lefèvre Gallery, London [see note 2]; by 1940, sold or transferred by Reid and Lefèvre to Bignou Gallery, New York [see note 3]; 1941, sold by Bignou to John Taylor Spaulding (b. 1870 - d. 1948), Boston; 1948, bequest of Spaulding to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 3, 1948) NOTES: [1] Julien (Jean) Tempelaere, son of the dealer Gustave Tempelaere, was a friend of the Glasgow dealer Alexander Reid. Through Tempelaere Reid developed an interest in, and began to stock, Fantin-Latour's work. See Francis Fowle, "West Scotland Collectors of Nineteenth-Century French Art," in Millet to Matisse: Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century French Painting from Kelvingrove Art Gallery, Glasgow, by Vivien Hamilton et al. (New Haven and London, 2002), p. 38. [2] Cargill lent this painting to the "Fantin-Latour Loan Exhibition" (Museum of French Art, New York, January-February, 1932), cat. no. 25. When Cargill died in 1939 part of his collection was dispersed in London and New York; see Fowle 2002 (as above, n. 1), p. 48. The painting seems likely at that time to have been sold directly to the successor to Alexander Reid's business, Alex Reid and Lefèvre Gallery. [3] Bignou Gallery and Reid and Lefèvre were closely associated and shared a stock of paintings. The painting was included in the exhibition "French Painters of the Romantic Period" (Bignou Gallery, New York, November 12 - 30, 1940), cat. no. 13.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Dimensions

    60 x 73.3 cm (23 5/8 x 28 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.540

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

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  • Basket of Fruit

    about 1864
    Edouard Manet (French, 1832–1883)

    Description

    This slight still-life composition served as a pretext for Manet to demonstrate his daring technical innovations. Single brushstrokes, applied wet in wet, evoke the velvet sheen of a peach, the dusky skin of a plum, the ripe form of a fig, the glint of a knife handle. These strokes are in fact so loose and summary that the painting has sometimes been called a study, though no “finished” version of the composition is known. Manet considered this picture sufficiently finished to include it in his first one-man exhibition in 1867.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Manet

    Provenance

    Passed from the artist to Madame d'Angély (Marguerite de Conflans), Paris [see note 1]; May 28, 1914, sold by Mme. d'Angély to Durand-Ruel, Paris; January 26, 1922, transferred from Durand-Ruel, Paris, to Durand-Ruel, New York; December 20, 1922, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to Annie Swan (Mrs. Lewis Larned) Coburn (b. 1856 - d. 1932), Chicago [see note 2]. 1924, with Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 4704); April 21, 1924, sold by Durand-Ruel to John Taylor Spaulding, Boston (b. 1870 - d. 1948); 1948, bequest of John Taylor Spaulding to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 3, 1948) NOTES: [1] According to an undated statement from Durand-Ruel in the MFA curatorial file, "This picture ... was purchased by us from Mme. d'Angely, an elderly lady of Paris, who obtained it directly from Manet." A note attached to this specifies that Mme. d'Angely was the married name of Marguerite de Conflans, whom Manet painted several times. [2] The provenance (from 1914 to 1922) was provided in a letter from Sophie Pietri, Wildenstein Institute, Paris, to the MFA (December 22, 1999).

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Dimensions

    37.8 x 44.4 cm (14 7/8 x 17 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.576

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Polly B. and Richard D. Hill Gallery (Gallery 253)

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  • Grapes and Walnuts on a Table

    1876
    Alfred Sisley (British (active in France), 1839–1899)

    Description

    It was likely at Monet’s suggestion that Sisley undertook this still life—one of just nine he ever painted. With its inventory of fruit, plate, walnuts, knife, and nutcracker, the modest composition exhibits all the hallmarks of an Impressionist picture, painted from life and in natural light. Ranged across the snowy expanse of the tablecloth—its topography of creases rendered with brisk strokes of blue and white—these objects almost take on the character of a landscape, Sisley’s more accustomed genre.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Sisley

    Provenance

    October 1, 1881, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris [see note 1]; February 6, 1925, sold by Durand-Ruel to John Taylor Spaulding (b. 1870 - d. 1948), Boston; 1948, bequest of Spaulding to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 3, 1948) NOTES: [1] According to a November 11, 1924 letter to Spaulding from E.C. Holston, (his Durand-Ruel, New York representative), Mr. Paul Durand-Ruel (b. 1831 - d. 1932) purchased the painting about fifty years prior and kept it in his private collection throughout his life.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Dimensions

    38.1 x 55.2 cm (15 x 21 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.601

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Polly B. and Richard D. Hill Gallery (Gallery 253)

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  • Eggplants and Pears

    1925
    Charles Demuth (American, 1883–1935)

    Description

    Inscription

    Inscribed center right in graphite: Lancaster Pa. Signed in pencil, l., C. Demuth-/1925.

    Markings

    PDP Watermark Type: partial watermark: 1924 UNBLEACHED ARNOLD

    Provenance

    John Taylor Spaulding (1870-1948, Boston); acquired by bequest June, 1948

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 35.4 x 50.7 cm (13 15/16 x 19 15/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.765

    Medium or Technique

    Opaque and transparent watercolor over graphite on paper

    Not On View

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  • Study of Fruit

    1877
    John William Hill (American (born in England), 1812–1879 American)

    Description

    Inscription

    Inscribed lower right in red paint: J.W. Hill 1877

    Provenance

    Maxim Karolik, Newport; Gift to MFA October 20, 1955

    Credit Line

    Gift of Maxim Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Watercolors and Drawings, 1800–1875

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Karolik (1962) cat. 379

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 15.6 x 27 cm (6 1/8 x 10 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    55.753

    Medium or Technique

    Watercolor over graphite on paper

    Not On View

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  • Fruit Piece

    J. E. Rightmyer (American, 19th century American)

    Description

    Inscription

    LR in graphite: signature

    Provenance

    Maxim Karolik (1893-1963, Newport); by whom given to MFA October 20, 1955

    Credit Line

    Gift of Maxim Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Watercolors and Drawings, 1800–1875

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Karolik cat. no 1271, fig 328 (Folk artists)

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 54 x 59.1 cm (21 1/4 x 23 1/4 in.) Framed: 64.1 x 69.2 cm (25 1/4 x 27 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    55.780

    Medium or Technique

    Pastel on paper

    Not On View

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  • Flowers and Fruit

    A. Florian (Active 1800–1835)

    Description

    Inscription

    LR in wash: A. Florian

    Markings

    Oral blind stamp of Rhoads & Sons, London.

    Provenance

    Maxim Karolik, Newport; Gift to MFA November 13, 1958

    Credit Line

    Gift of Maxim Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Watercolors and Drawings, 1800–1875

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Karolik cat. no 299

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 37.1 x 46.4 cm (14 5/8 x 18 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    58.1147

    Medium or Technique

    Watercolor on paper

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  • Peaches and Pears in a Glass Bowl

    Giovanni Paolo Spadino (Italian (Roman), active about 1687–1703)

    Description

    Provenance

    About 1911, Anna Barberini Colonna (b. 1840 - d. 1911), Tagliacozzo, Abruzzo, Italy [see note 1]; by descent within the family and, about 1958, sold by the Corsini family to Luigi Albrighi, Florence [see note 2]; 1959, sold by Albrighi to the MFA for $6000. (Accession Date: March 12, 1959) NOTES: [1] Anna Barberini Colonna was the wife of Tommaso Corsini (b. 1835 - d. 1919). A painting in her inventory (about 1911, no. 202), described as a vessel of fruit measuring 60 x 72 cm., is noted to have come from the Barberini collection. This may be the MFA painting. [2] According to correspondence from Albrighi to the MFA (see letter of August 20, 1964). The painting was accessioned as a work by an unknown Italian painter of the 17th century.

    Credit Line

    M. Theresa B. Hopkins Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    61.2 x 75.9 cm (24 1/8 x 29 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    59.193

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Plate of Peaches

    1862
    Henri Fantin-Latour (French, 1836–1904)

    Description

    This unusually intimate composition betrays Fantin’s debt to Chardin, the 18th-century master of still life who returned to art-historical fashion in the early 1860s. Carefully restricted to three peaches, a plate, and a fruit knife, the composition has a rapt quality, conveying to the viewer a sense of the painter’s own hushed absorption in his subject.

    Inscription

    Upper left: Fantin / 1862

    Provenance

    Probably sold by the artist to Gustave Tempelaere (b. 1840 - d. 1904), Paris [see note 1]; about 1900, sold by Tempelaere to a private collector, Paris; by descent within the family until about 1960; about 1960, sold by a private collector to Paul Rosenberg and Co., New York; 1960, sold by Rosenberg to the MFA for $7,250. (Accession Date: June 8, 1960) NOTES: [1] The provenance was provided by Paul Rosenberg and Co. at the time of the painting's acquisition. Gustave Tempelaere's gallery maintained a close relationship with Fantin-Latour, who probably sold this work directly to him. Notes in the MFA curatorial file, which are unverified, suggest that the private collector who purchased the work around 1900 was a M. Gorgeu, and that the painting was passed on by descent within his family.

    Credit Line

    M. Theresa B. Hopkins Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    18.1 x 32 cm (7 1/8 x 12 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    60.792

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Polly B. and Richard D. Hill Gallery (Gallery 253)

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  • Still Life with Fruit

    about 1866
    Joseph Goodhue Chandler (American, 1813–1884)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower right: J.G. Chandler

    Provenance

    The artist; John Bowden, Bayside, New York; with Vose Galleries, Boston, by 1959; to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I., 1959; to MFA, 1962, gift of Maxim Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Maxim Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815–1865

    Details

    Dimensions

    63.5 x 76.52 cm (25 x 30 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    62.267

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

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  • Fruit and Flower Piece

    1848
    William Sharp (English, 1749–1824)

    Description

    Fruit and Flower Piece is one of the few known paintings by William Sharp, an artist who worked primarily as a printmaker making illustrating botanical publications. Sharp emigrated from England and in the late 1830s settled in Boston where he was one of the first to experiment with color lithography. Fruit and Flower Piece reflects the aesthetic of Sharp’s botanical training: each object is carefully drawn with little modeling and flat coloring, emphasizing a linear elegance rather than a painterly approach. The asymmetrical composition and landscape background are derived from seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish still lifes.
    The flowers and fruits in this lush image hail from a variety of climates and seasons. In a gilded French porcelain vase, Sharp included morning glories, tulips, lilies, foxglove, roses, dahlias, and phlox, as well as two large clusters of grapes. The vase itself is decorated with a landscape that echoes the scene in the background. A basket to the right holds strawberries, currants, and cherries; a peach and perhaps some plums are piled in a white pressed glass dish nearby. More peaches and plums, as well as apples, an exotic pineapple, and a bunch of bananas surround these containers on the marble tabletop. Such bountiful presentations were popular with American still-life painters at this time, suggesting and prosperity abundance to a Victorian audience.

    Karen Quinn

    Inscription

    Lower right: W Sharp. pinxt 1848 Boston

    Provenance

    The artist; Mrs. Lottie J. Whitney, Jamaica Plain, Mass.; to Mrs. Robert W. Swift, Jr., Milton, Mass., her granddaughter; with Gustav Klimann, Boston, 1959; to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I., 1959; to MFA, 1964, bequest of Maxim Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Maxim Karolik

    Details

    Dimensions

    91.44 x 73.66 cm (36 x 29 in.)

    Accession Number

    64.449

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

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  • Still Life: Bowl with Fruit and Wine Glass

    1865
    John Edward Hollen (American (born in Germany), 1814–1881)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower right: J.E. Hollen. 1865.

    Provenance

    The artist; General Lee family; private dealer, Atlanta, Georgia; with Gertrude Bickel, Dorset, N.H.; with Olive Hannan, Chatham, Mass.; with James I. McGrath, Winchester, Mass., about 1961; with Vose Galleries, Boston, 1961, to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I., 1961; to MFA, 1964, bequest of Maxim Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Maxim Karolik

    Details

    Dimensions

    35.24 x 45.4 cm (13 7/8 x 17 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    64.459

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

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  • Brighton Grapes (from D.M. Dewey, Nurseryman's Pocket Book of Specimen Fruit and Flowers, 1875)

    1875
    Artist Unidentified artist, American, 19th century, Printer and Publisher D. M. Dewey, Rochester, NY (American, 19th century)

    Description

    Provenance

    Mrs. Alan Tawse, New Hampshire; by whom given to MFA November 10, 1970.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Allan Tawse

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 22 x 13.4 cm (8 11/16 x 5 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1970.546

    Medium or Technique

    Stencil

    Not On View

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  • Crawford's Late - (peach)

    1875
    Artist Unidentified artist, American, 19th century

    Description

    Provenance

    Mrs. Alan Tawse, New Hampshire; by whom given to MFA November 10, 1970.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Allan Tawse

    Details

    Accession Number

    1970.547

    Medium or Technique

    Stencil

    Not On View

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  • Wilson's Albany (Strawberries) from D.M. Dewey, Nurseryman's Pocket Book of Specimen Fruit and Flowers, 1875

    1875
    Artist Unidentified artist, American, 19th century, Printer and Publisher D. M. Dewey, Rochester, NY (American, 19th century)

    Description

    Provenance

    Mrs. Allan Tawse; by whom given to MFA November 10,1970

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Allan Tawse

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 22.2 x 13.7 cm (8 3/4 x 5 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1970.548

    Medium or Technique

    Stencil and watercolor

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  • Duchess of Oldenburg - (apple)

    1875
    Artist Unidentified artist, American, 19th century

    Description

    Provenance

    Mrs. Alan Tawse, New Hampshire; by whom given to MFA November 10, 1970.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Allan Tawse

    Details

    Accession Number

    1970.549

    Medium or Technique

    Stencil

    Not On View

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  • Dorchester - (blackberries)

    1875
    Artist Unidentified artist, American, 19th century

    Description

    Provenance

    Mrs. Alan Tawse, New Hampshire; by whom given to MFA November 10, 1970.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Allan Tawse

    Details

    Accession Number

    1970.550

    Medium or Technique

    Stencil

    Not On View

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  • Crawford's Early - (peach)

    1875
    Artist Anonymous, American, 19th century (American)

    Description

    Provenance

    Mrs. Alan Tawse, New Hampshire; by whom given to MFA November 10, 1970.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Allan Tawse

    Details

    Accession Number

    1970.552

    Medium or Technique

    Lithograph

    Not On View

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  • Still Life on a Green Table Cloth

    about 1815
    Charles Bird King (American, 1785–1862 American)

    Description

    Provenance

    The artist; Charles Lalli, Brockton, Mass.; Mrs. Samuel Parkman Oliver; to MFA, 1978, gift of Mrs. Samuel Parkman Oliver.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Samuel Parkman Oliver

    Details

    Dimensions

    47.62 x 55.88 cm (18 3/4 x 22 in.)

    Accession Number

    1978.184

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on panel

    Not On View

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  • Apples in a Tin Pail

    1892
    Levi Wells Prentice (American, 1851–1935 American)

    Description

    Fruit continued to be a frequent theme of still life paintings throughout the nineteenth century, despite the growing popularity of floral paintings. De Scott Evans, Joseph Decker, John McCloskey, and Levi Wells Prentice all painted fruit in a hard-edged or trompe l’oeil style during the last decades of the nineteenth century. Almost entirely self-taught, Prentice began his career in 1871 as a landscape painter in the Adirondack Mountains of New York state. It was not until he moved to Brooklyn in 1883 that he began to paint still lifes, usually of fruit, although occasionally of flowers and fish. Prentice supplemented his living by designing furniture, building houses, making frames, and creating stained glass windows. He also made all his own palettes, brushes, easels, frames, and shadow boxes.

    Prentice made painting apples somewhat of a specialty, depicting the fruit in no fewer than forty pictures. In the 1840s, the Boston writer-philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson declared the apple to be America’s “national fruit.” An integral part of the American diet for four centuries, apples have traditionally been used in pies, jellies, applesauce, and cakes, eaten plain or baked, and made into cider-especially hard cider, a staple in the nineteenth century. Prentice’s paintings of apples depict the fruit variously spilling out of baskets, bags, and hats on the ground or on a tabletop, growing on boughs, or loosely resting on the ground. The Museum’s picture, his best-known still life, shows apples in a tin pail, on a rough table, and in a bowl. Bruised and blemished, the apples are undoubtedly to be used for cooking or for cider. While the subject matter of the painting is humble, Prentice’s technique is meticulous. He portrayed each apple with hard-edged realism and painstakingly conveyed the reflections of the apples and the bowl in the curved, gleaming surface of the tin pail. A striking composition of rounded forms in vibrant colors, Prentice’s painting celebrates a plentiful harvest in rural America.

    This text was adapted from Davis, et al., MFA Highlights: American Painting (Boston, 2003) available at www.mfashop.com/mfa-publications.html.

    Inscription

    Lower right: L.W. Prentice./1892.

    Provenance

    The artist; with Paul Magriel, New York; Mrs. Norman B. Woolworth, Winthrop, Maine, by 1970; with Coe Kerr Gallery, New York; to MFA, 1978, purchase.

    Credit Line

    The Hayden Collection—Charles Henry Hayden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    41.27 x 33.65 cm (16 1/4 x 13 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1978.468

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • A Porcelain Bowl with Fruit

    1830
    James Peale (American, 1749–1831 American)

    Description

    A member of the illustrious Peale family, which played a prominent role in the cultural and intellectual life of postcolonial America, James Peale grew up in Annapolis, Maryland, and received his artistic training from his older brother Charles Willson Peale, who had studied in London with Benjamin West. After serving in the Continental Army under George Washington, James moved to Philadelphia, where he joined his brother’s portrait studio, painting miniatures while Charles handled the commissions for larger-scale canvases. Though he exhibited a still life in 1795 at the Columbianum exhibition in Philadelphia, James painted few if any still lifes during the next twenty years. His reputation as one of the first professional still-life painters in the United States, a distinction he shares with Charles’s son Raphaelle, rests on the works that he executed between 1819 and 1831 and exhibited at Rembrandt Peale’s Baltimore Museum, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the Boston Athenaeum. Why James turned to still life so late in his career is not known, but it may well have been Raphaelle’s example that inspired him. Still-life painting held little economic incentive prior to the second decade of the nineteenth century. By that time the number of exhibitions mounted in the United States began to increase, thus providing painters with more opportunities to display their works to the public, an important consideration in the case of still lifes, which were usually painted on speculation rather than on commission. [1]
    Peale favored pieces of fruit or vegetables or combinations thereof and in general placed them in wicker baskets, directly on a table or shelf, or in a ceramic bowl as he does here. He painted a number of his still lifes in a classical style, emphasizing solid simple forms and balanced rectilinear designs. While the present canvas displays well-modeled pieces of fruit and clearly delineated geometric shapes, a nascent romantic spirit tempers its classical sobriety. Light plays over the objects and the background, illuminating some passages and leaving others in darkness, giving the canvas a faintly moody quality. Bunches of grapes fall languorously from the bowl and lie expressively on the table.The lines bounding the different objects are slightly blurred, and the composition is arranged along a diagonal line that moves from the lower left corner through the center of the picture. As in many of his still lifes, Peale depicted blemishes and brown spots on the pieces of fruit. Those spots not only enhance the naturalism of the image, but also insinuate the specters of death and decay, favored Romantic themes, and link the canvas to the tradition of vanitas still lifes, which remind the viewer of the transience of life.

    On the evidence of the inscription on the original canvas, this work is customarily dated to 1830. James’s nephew Rubens Peale, another son of Charles, painted two copies of this composition that date to 1856 and 1860 (Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, New York, and Mead Art Museum, Amherst, Massachusetts). In Rubens’s versions, the light is more evenly distributed, the line tighter, and the composition altogether stiffer.

    Notes
    1.William H. Gerdts, Painters of the Humble Truth: Masterpieces of American Still Life, 1801–1939, exh. cat. (Columbia, Mo.: Philbrook Art Center and University of Missouri Press, 1981), 50–51.

    This text was adapted from Karyn Esielonis, Still-Life Painting in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, exh. cat. (Boston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1994).

    Inscription

    Reverse, before relining: "Painted by James Peale, In the 82nd Year of His Age Philad·a 1830/The above was written by the old Gentleman himself/A.P."

    Provenance

    1831, Anna Claypool Peale (1791-1878), Philadelphia. April 26, 1848, sale, Sully and Earles Gallery, Philadelphia. With A.F. Mondschein, New York. Paul Lane, Tivoli, New York; November 20, 1954, American & English XVIII Century Furniture, Silver, Paintings and Rugs, Parke-Bernet, New York, lot 290. James Ricau (1916-1993), Piermont, New York; 1973, sold by James Ricau to JoAnn and Julian Ganz, Jr., Los Angeles, Calif.; 1979, partial purchase and partial gift of JoAnn and Julian Ganz, Jr. to the MFA. 1979. (Accession Date: November 14, 1979)

    Credit Line

    Gift of JoAnn and Julian Ganz, Jr. and Emily L. Ainsley Fund and Eliza Oliver Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    41.59 x 56.83 cm (16 3/8 x 22 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1979.520

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

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  • Still Life with Fruit and Dead Birds in a Landscape

    Giovanni Battista Ruoppolo (Italian (Neapolitan), 1629–1693)

    Description

    Provenance

    Anonymous collection (or anonymous dealer), Rome (an old ms. label on the stretcher describes it as a fruit piece from an old Roman Gallery). By 1890 Mrs. Henry Edwards; 1890 MFA (bequest of Edwards; formerly as Giovanni Battista Ruoppoli) (Accession date: April 1, 1890)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Mrs. Henry Edwards

    Details

    Dimensions

    75 x 36.5 cm (29 1/2 x 14 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    90.82

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

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  • Tomatoes, Fruit, and Flowers

    about 1860
    Unidentified artist, American, mid-19th century (American)

    Description

    Interest in still-life paintings burgeoned in mid-nineteenth-century America. Large images of varied objects, like this one, were popular for dining rooms, suggesting abundance, well-being, and hospitality. The compote piled high with fruit, bone-handled knife, melons, grapes with their leaves, and flowers are also found in the work of contemporary academic still-life painters such as Severin Roesen and John F. Francis. Their objects, as here, are arranged against a monochrome background modulated with muted light. Unlike academic still lifes, however, this painting seems more additive than integrated. The emphasis is less on texture and atmosphere - a sense of the whole - than on discrete shapes and emphatic contours.
    Although most of the objects in this image are commonplace, paintings including tomatoes are rare, possibly because many people neither liked nor trusted this fruit. In 1852, for example, a Harvard-educated doctor claimed that tomatoes caused teeth to become so loose they could be easily removed with the fingers.

    This text was adapted from Gerald W. R. Ward, et al, “American Folk” (Boston, MFA Publications, 2001).

    Provenance

    The artist; with a Vermont dealer; with Charles D. Childs, Boston; with Harry Stone, New York, 1947; to Maxim Karolik, Newport, R.I., 1947; to MFA, 1947, gift of Martha C. (Mrs. Maxim) Karolik.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Martha C. Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815–1865

    Details

    Dimensions

    50.8 x 80.01 cm (20 x 31 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1265

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

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  • Pears

    about 1862–66
    Jean-François Millet (French, 1814–1875)

    Description

    The fruit and flowers included in still life paintings are often rare and expensive varieties. But Millet believed in the beauty of common things, even simple pears from a rural garden. “Who would dare to claim,” he asked, “that a potato is inferior to a pomegranate?”

    Inscription

    Lower right: J. F. Millet

    Provenance

    Madame J.-F. Millet, Barbizon. By 1917, Quincy Adams Shaw, Boston; 1917, given to the MFA by Quincy Adams Shaw through Quincy A. Shaw, Jr., and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton (Accession Date: March 29, 1917)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Quincy Adams Shaw through Quincy Adams Shaw, Jr., and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton

    Details

    Dimensions

    18.4 x 25.4 cm (7 1/4 x 10 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.1519

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on panel

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  • Small panel: Spray of pears for applique work

    English
    late 16th or early 17th century

    Object Place: England

    Description

    Small square piece; natural-colored linen canvas with design of spray of pears worked with polychrome silks in tent stitch; much of black rotted away.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Sir Leigh Ashton

    Details

    Dimensions

    17.2 x 17.5 cm (6 3/4 x 6 7/8 in.); Legacy dimension: 0.172 x 0.75 m

    Accession Number

    49.1899

    Medium or Technique

    Linen; Silk; Wool, silk tent stitched embroidered on linen

    Not On View

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    Europe, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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    Textiles

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  • Pears and Apple, France

    1919
    Edward Steichen (American (born in Luxembourg), 1879–1973)

    Description

    In his early career, Edward Steichen was a major figure in Pictorialism, an international movement that conceived of photography as a fine art and emphasized broad tonal effects that minimized detail. But by 1920 he fell under the spell of European modernism and moved toward straight photography, which was characterized by strong design and simple compositions. In Pears and Apple, France, Steichen concentrates on the physical reality of the fruit, reflecting his new belief that photography’s real strength lay in its ability to reveal essential truths through an analysis of external form. He approached this still life as an abstract problem of how to represent volume, scale, and weight. With no manipulation of the negative or print, the fruit, photographed close-up and cropped tightly in the frame, seems voluptuous, heavy, and monumental.

    Provenance

    G. W. Einstein, New York; purchased November 1984.

    Credit Line

    Sophie M. Friedman Fund

    Copyright

    © 2014 The Estate of Edward Steichen / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    Details

    Dimensions

    Image/Sheet: 24.3 x 19.2 cm (9 9/16 x 7 9/16 in.) Mount: 25.5 x 20.3 cm (10 1/16 x 8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1984.584

    Medium or Technique

    Photograph, gelatin silver print

    Not On View

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  • Still Life with Goblet and Fruit

    1656
    Jan Jansz. van de Velde (Dutch, 1619 or 1620–1662)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower right: Jan Vande Velde ANO / 1656 / fecit

    Provenance

    Henry Jacob Bigelow (b. 1818 - d. 1890), Boston, MA; by descent to William Sturgis Bigelow (b. 1850 - d. 1926), Boston; by 1927, from William Bigelow to an anonymous donor; 1927, gift by exchange from an anonymous donor to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 8, 1927)

    Credit Line

    Anonymous gift, by exchange

    Details

    Dimensions

    37.5 x 34.9 cm (14 3/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    27.465

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Fruit and Vase of Flowers on a Ledge

    Pietro Paolini (Italian (Lucchese), 1603–1681)

    Description

    Provenance

    Anonymous collection, Turin. 1938, Matthiesen, Ltd., London; October 1938, sold by Matthiesen to M. Knoedler and Co., New York (stock no. A 2057); 1939, sold by Knoedler to the MFA for $1,400 [see note 1]. (Accession Date: January 12, 1939). NOTES: [1] Accessioned as a work by Luis Meléndez.

    Credit Line

    Ernest Wadsworth Longfellow Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    53.6 x 78.1 cm (21 1/8 x 30 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    39.42

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Still Life with Roses in a Glass Vase

    Samuel John Peploe (Scottish, 1871–1935)

    Description

    The Scottish painter Peploe spent a number of years in Paris, where he responded to a range of influences from contemporary avant-garde art. Although he painted figure subjects and landscapes, Peploe preferred still life to both. “There is so much,” he explained, “in mere objects, flowers, leaves, jugs, what not—colors, forms, relations—I can never see that mystery coming to an end.”

    Inscription

    Lower right: peploe

    Provenance

    By 1926, Alex Reid and Lefevre, Glascow. 1948, John Taylor Spaulding, Boston, MA (d. 1948); 1948, bequest of Spaulding. (Accession Date: June 3, 1948)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Dimensions

    61 x 50.8 cm (24 x 20 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.586

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Still Life in an Architectural Setting

    about 1645
    Jan Fyt (Flemish, 1611–1661), Erasmus Quellinus, the Younger (Flemish, 1607–1678)

    Description

    Provenance

    François Emmanuel van Ertborn (b. 1716 - d. 1791), Antwerp; August 18, 1807, posthumous Ertborn sale, Beeckmans, Antwerp, lot 42, to Henri-Joseph Stier d'Aertselaer, Antwerp; July 29, 1822, Aertselaer sale, G. J. Bincken, Antwerp, lot 25, to Paramosky (or Baranowsky), Vienna. Jean Baptiste Puthon (b. 1773 - d. 1839), Vienna; 1840, sold from the Puthon collection, probably through Artaria and Co., Vienna, to Philipp Dräxler von Carin, Vienna; probably sold by Dräxler von Carin to Baron Samuel von Festetits (b. 1806 - d. 1862), Vienna [see note 1]; March 7 and April 11, 1859, Festetits sale, Vienna, lot 101, to Friedrich Jakob Gsell (d. 1872), Vienna; March 14, 1872, Gsell sale, Plach, Vienna, lot 30, sold to Plach, possibly for Anselm Solomon von Rothschild (b. 1803 - d. 1874), Vienna; by descent to Nathaniel von Rothschild (b. 1836 - d. 1905), Vienna; by descent to his nephew, Alphonse Rothschild (b. 1878 - d. 1942) and Clarice de Rothschild (b. 1894 - d. 1967), Vienna; 1938, confiscated from Alphonse and Clarice de Rothschild by Nazi forces (no. AR884); taken to the Kunsthistorisches Museum, stored at the Central Depot, Neue Burg, Vienna, and selected for the Führermuseum, Linz [see note 2]; removed to the monastery of Kremsmünster (K 995); December 16, 1943, taken from Kremsmünster to the Führerbau, Munich (no. 3225) [see note 3] and later moved to Alt Aussee [see note 4]; July 19, 1945, shipped by Allied forces to the Munich Central Collecting Point (MCCP no. 4928) [see note 5]; May 11, 1948, released from the MCCP to United States Forces in Austria; April 12, 1949, returned to Clarice de Rothschild, New York [see note 6]; sold by Clarice de Rothschild to Rosenberg and Stiebel, New York; 1950, sold by Rosenberg and Stiebel to the MFA for $3,000. (Accession Date: September 14, 1950) NOTES: [1] On the provenance of this painting from Puthon to Gsell, see Theodor von Frimmel, "Lexikon der Wiener Gemäldesammlungen" (Munich, 1913), pp. 290, 375-376. Festetits acquired many works of art from Dräxler von Carin, and it is likely that he acquired this painting from him as well. [2] With the Anschluss, or annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany in March, 1938, the possessions of Alphonse and Clarice de Rothschild were seized and expropriated almost immediately by Nazi forces. This painting appears in a Nazi-generated inventory of 1939 as no. AR (Alphonse Rothschild) 884: "Jan Fyt, Architektur mit Stilleben. Leinwand, 112 x 83." Katalog beschlagnahmter Sammlungen, inbesondere der Rothschild-Sammlungen in Wien, Verlags-Nr. 4938, Staatsdruckerei Wien, 1939, Privatarchiv, reproduced in Sophie Lillie, "Was einmal war: Handbuch der enteigneten Kunstsammlungen Wiens" (Vienna, 2003), p. 1032. The Führermuseum, the art museum Adolf Hitler planned to build in Linz, Austria, was given right of first refusal over the confiscated Rothschild collection. This painting was included in an inventory of the museum drawn up on July 31, 1940. CIR no. 4, attachment 73. [3] The Führerbau in Munich was used as a repository for works of art. An inventory of the paintings was drawn up in 1943; the Führerbau inventory number, 3225, is recorded on the reverse of this painting's stretcher in chalk and on a label. [4] Many works of art stored elsewhere by the Nazis were moved to the abandoned salt mines of Alt Aussee in Austria, to be kept safe from wartime bombing. [5] Allied troops recovered the artwork at the end of World War II and established collecting points where the art could be identified for restitution to its rightful owners. This painting came to the Munich Central Collecting Point in 1945 from Alt Aussee shipment number 3577, and was numbered 4928, which is recorded on the reverse of the painting stretcher. The Munich Central Collecting Point inventory card is held by the National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland (Property Card 4928; National Archives Record Group 260, Box 501; and National Archives Record Group 260, Entry USACA-USFA; File Rep & Rest. Box 158). [6] See Birgit Schwarz, "Hitlers Museum. Die Fotoalben Gemäldegalerie Linz: Dokumente zum 'Führermuseum'" (Cologne and Weimar, 2004), p. 101, no. II/26.

    Credit Line

    Ernest Wadsworth Longfellow Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    112.4 x 82.9 cm (44 1/4 x 32 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    50.2728

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Fruit and Vegetable Vendors

    1577
    Scipio Goltzius (Flemish, active in late 16th century)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower left, on bucket lid: SCIPIO GOLTZ. ANTWERPIENSIS. FECIT 1.5.7.7.

    Provenance

    Alvan Tufts Fuller (b. 1878 - d. 1958) and his wife, Viola Davenport Fuller (b. 1882 - d. 1959), Rye Beach, NH; by descent to their daughter, Mary Fuller Henderson (b. 1916 - d. 1989) and her husband, Robert L. Henderson, Boston; 1967, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Henderson to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 28, 1967)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Henderson

    Details

    Dimensions

    138.1 x 203.2 cm (54 3/8 x 80 in.)

    Accession Number

    67.752

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Still Life with Fruit, Wan-Li Porcelain, and Squirrel

    1616
    Frans Snyders (Flemish, 1579–1657)

    Description

    Snyders made a handsome living in Antwerp as a painter of animals, hunting scenes, and still lifes. He also contributed these elements to paintings done by other artists, including Peter Paul Rubens. This exuberant and exceptionally well preserved work is painted on copper, a costly support whose smooth surface was ideal for Snyders’s rich coloristic effects, meticulous brushwork, and masterful evocation of varied surfaces and textures.

    Inscription

    Signed and dated lower right: Frans Snyders fecit 1616

    Provenance

    Schaumburg-Lippe collection, Germany [see note 1]. December 16, 1929, Régine Chasles and others sale, Galerie Fievez, Brussels, lot 90. 1934, Kunsthaus A.G., Lucerne, Switzerland. By 1956, Edmond Meert, Saint-Nicholas-Waas, Belgium [see note 2]. Deschandau collection, Belgium [see note 3]. 1970, with Edward Speelman, Ltd., London; 1970, sold by Speelman to Robert H. Smith, Arlington, VA [see note 4]; 1993, sold by Smith to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 22, 1993) NOTES: [1] The provenance given here (to 1956) is taken from Hella Robels, "Frans Snyders, Stilleben- und Tiermaler, 1579-1657" (Munich, 1989), p. 261, cat. no. 125. [2] Edith Greindl, "Les peintres flamandes de nature morte au XVIIe siècle" (Brussels, 1956), p. 181, published the painting as in the collection of Edmond Meert, though when he acquired it and when it left his possession have not been established. [3] According to information provided by Anthony Speelman of Edward Speelman, Ltd. (May 17, 2004). The dates of ownership are not known, nor has it been established whether Speelman acquired the painting directly from this collection. [4] That the painting was purchased from Speelman in 1970 is information provided by Robert Smith in a letter to Peter C. Sutton of the MFA (July 14, 1993; in MFA curatorial file).

    Credit Line

    M. and M. Karolik Fund and Frank Brewer Bemis Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    56 x 84 cm (22 1/16 x 33 1/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    1993.566

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on copper

    On View

    Leo and Phyllis Beranek Gallery (Gallery 243)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

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  • Still Life

    about 1910–13
    Maurice Brazil Prendergast (American (born in Canada), 1858–1924)

    Description

    One of America’s early modernists, Prendergast painted some fifteen innovative fruit still lifes, probably between 1910 and 1913. Prendergast rarely exhibited or sold his still lifes, and they are difficult to date. The only one of his fruit pieces which can be securely dated is “Apples and a Pear on the Grass” (1912, Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art), which Prendergast painted on a visit with the American artist William Glackens [59.658] and his wife. He also completed about fifteen flower pieces during this period [see “Flowers in a Blue Vase,” 48.589].

    Prendergast seems to have painted these still lifes as a way to come to terms with the work of Paul Cézanne, whose pictures he had studied on a trip to Paris in 1907. At the time, Paris was full of avant-garde artists, but Prendergast wrote, “I think Cézanne will influence me more than the others… He left everything to the imagination. [His paintings] are great for their symplicity [sic] and suggestive qualities,” (quoted in Nancy Mowll Mathews, “Maurice Prendergast,” Williamstown, Mass. and Munich: Williams College and Prestel-Verlag, 1990, p. 25). All of Prendergast’s fruit pieces include apples, which were also prominently featured by Cézanne. Like the French artist, Prendergast modeled these round forms by using patches of color rather than shaded tones, and he outlined the objects in dark pigment to differentiate them from the background. The slight tilt of the tabletop and the white napkin under the fruit in “Still Life” also recall Cézanne’s work. Yet Prendergast did not slavishly copy the older artist. He incorporated Cézanne’s ideas into his own mature style, which because of its decorative qualities, has variously been described as comparable to mosaics, tapestries, or brocades. Prendergast’s brush strokes, evenly distributed and each equally vigorous, create an overall pattern in his paintings.

    The MFA’s canvas differs from Prendergast’s other still lifes; here he included more high-style objects, like the silver urn, the porcelain tea pot, cup, and saucer. While Prendergast dispensed with traditional illusionistic devices such as shadows and shading, he did include reflections on the silver urn, simplifying them into patches of color that correspond to nearby objects. Another unusual feature is the compote, which is repeated in the background as if it stood before a mirror, but the reflection does not replicate exactly what appears on the table. Such a ghost image also appears in Prendergast’s “Cinerarias and Fruit” (about 1910-1913, Whitney Museum of American Art). Prendergast’s “Still Life,” with its rich surface texture, dynamic composition, and dazzling colors, communicates a vital energy rare in this genre of painting.

    When Prendergast died in 1924, he left “Still Life” (along with the rest of his estate) to his brother Charles, also an artist [see “Flowers,” 48.840]. Charles’s widow, Eugénie Prendergast, gave “Still Life,” as well as “Portrait of Maurice Prendergast’s Father” [69.1262], and “Woman in Brown Coat” [68.585] to the MFA, thereby ensuring that the Museum’s collection would include the full range of the painter’s work.

    Janet Comey

    Inscription

    Upper left: Prendergast

    Provenance

    The artist; to Charles Prendergast, his brother, 1924; to Mrs. Charles Prendergast, 1948; to MFA, 1970, gift of Mrs. Charles Prendergast.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Charles Prendergast in honor of Perry T. Rathbone

    Details

    Dimensions

    48.89 x 53.66 cm (19 1/4 x 21 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1970.1

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas

    Classifications

    Paintings

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  • Still Life with Plums

    about 1919
    Joseph Stella (American, 1877–1946 American)

    Description

    Provenance

    Barbara Mathes Gallery, Inc., New York; purchased by MFA, March 1983.

    Credit Line

    Sophie M. Friedman Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Sheet: 27.9 x 35.6cm (11 x 14 in.) Framed: 41.3 x 48.6 cm (16 1/4 x 19 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1983.150

    Medium or Technique

    Color pencil over metalpoint on prepared paper

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas, Prints and Drawings

    Classifications

    Drawings

    More Info

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