• The MFA has been collecting textiles since it opened in the 1870s, and in 1930 a separate Textile Department with dedicated curatorial staff was formed. Today, the Textile and Fashion Arts collection includes magnificent examples from ancient times through the present day, from cultures throughout the world. Mind-bogglingly complex ancient Peruvian weavings, the finest Persian carpets, luxurious Italian Renaissance velvets, dramatic Japanese Noh play costumes, and twentieth-century couture by designers like Geoffrey Beene are just a few of the treasures that can be found here.

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  • Man's mantle and two border fragments

    Peruvian (Paracas)
    Early Intermediate Period, possibly Phase 1B
    A.D. 50–100

    Object Place: Peru, South Coast

    Description

    Black wool ground with design worked in wool of bird impersonators with elaborate wings, fringed capes, headdresses, and snakes, carrying ceremonial staffs and trophy heads. The colors (crimson, pink, blue, dark green, yellow and grayish green) are used in four different combinations of color in the figures. Unfinished rectangles in each corner show similar figures on an embroidered golden brown ground.

    Provenance

    Excavated by Julio C. Tello, Lima [see note 1]; By 1916, sold by Tello to Denman Waldo Ross [see note 2]; 1916, gift of Ross to the MFA. (Accession date: February 3, 1916) NOTES: [1] Tello, a Peruvian archaeologist, excavated the fragments "found in a cemetery three or four miles south of Pisco", according to a November 21, 1917 letter from Sarah G. Flint. [2] Ross purchased the textile fragments from Tello between December 27, 1915 and January 8, 1916. See Anne Paul's "Paracas Art & Architecture: Object and Context in South Coastal Peru". Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1991. Appendix 1.1 Paracas Textiles Known to Be in Collection before 1925, pg. 33.

    Credit Line

    Denman Waldo Ross Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (a): 101 x 244.3 cm (39 3/4 x 96 3/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    16.34a-c

    Medium or Technique

    Wool plain weave, embroidered with wool

    Not On View

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    Americas, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Neck ornament

    Found in Egypt
    Late Antique Period
    3rd-4th century A.D.(?)

    Findspot: Egypt

    Description

    Ground of dark brownish purple wool; deisgn of green, red and brown wool, natural-colored linen and gold wrapped silk; consists of two squares, one slightly larger than the other, connected by two bands; the larger square represents dolphins and marine deities, including nereids, erotes and a triton; the square panel at the other end shows a sea creature holding a rudder; the two bands display jewel-like motifs and three heads in each band; the central head, crowned by wreaths, probably represents Dionysus.

    Provenance

    By 1946, Mrs. Paul Mallon, Paris; 1946, sold by Mallon to the MFA for $22,500 [see note 1]. (Accession date: May 9, 1946) NOTES: [1] 46.401 and 46.402 were purchased together for this price.

    Credit Line

    Charles Potter Kling Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 56.9 x 15.8 cm (22 3/8 x 6 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    46.401

    Medium or Technique

    Wool, linen, and gold-wrapped silk thread slit tapestry

    Not On View

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    Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Fragment with wrestling lions and harpies

    Spanish (probably Almería)
    Almoravid
    Early 12th century

    Object Place: possibly Almería, Spain

    Description

    Fragment of shroud believed to have been part of the shroud of a bishop of Burgo de Osma. Design of pairs of lions attacking human-headed birds within circles connected by smaller circles containing inscriptions, woven with red, green, and light brown silk (weft) and gold thread (brocaded). The inscription has been translated by R. Guest as follows “This was made in the town of Baghdad, may God guard it.”

    Provenance

    Said to come from the tomb of bishop San Pedro de Osma (d. 1109) in the Cathedral of Burgo de Osma, Spain [see note 1]. 1933, Herman A. Elsberg (b. 1869 - d. 1938), New York; 1933, sold by Elsberg to the MFA for $14,500 [see note 2]. (Accession date: March 7, 1933) NOTES: [1] See Adele Coulin Weibel, Two Thousand Years of Textiles (New York: Pantheon, 1952), p. 96, cat. no. 66. [2] Purchased with MFA 33.372 for $14,500.

    Credit Line

    Ellen Page Hall Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    50 x 43 cm (19 11/16 x 16 15/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    33.371

    Medium or Technique

    Silk lampas with supplementary discontinuous metal-wrapped patterning wefts

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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    Textiles

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  • Tapestry: Wild Men and Moors

    German (probably Strasbourg, Alsace)
    about 1440

    Object Place: Possibly Strasbourg, Alsace, Germany

    Description

    Series of scenes (left to right), wild men attacking Moors in castle, wilk men fighting with lion, dragon, and unicorn, and wild men carrying food to wild woman with two children seated at foot of rocks; stylized trees, plants, rocks; stylized trees, plants, rocks; pinkish-red background covered with roses in two shades of pinkish-red, frames by diamond lattice formed by links of chain, blue, darker blue, and white. In lower part of tapestry, right half, a shield divided horizontally, upper half yellow with two red roses with blue conters, lower half black (Blümel, Alsace), same arms appear as manteling on helmet lower center of tapestry. On far right helmet surmounted by ibex horn with mantling red with two white stars (Zorn, Strassburg). Human faces woven without features, which are painted, possibly originally embroidered, some embroidery stitches survive. Weaving finished so back and face almost identical, except for faces. Colors include very dark blue (almost black), several shades of blue, green, yellow, orange, pink, red, and grayish violet.

    Provenance

    First half of the 19th century, probably Wilhelm Dettelbach, Gailingen, near Konstanz, Germany [see note 1]; probably sold by Dettelbach to the Princes of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen; by 1874, kept at the Fürstlich Hohenzollernsches Museum, Sigmaringen, Germany [see note 2]; 1928, sold, upon the dispersal of the collection under the direction of the Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt, to Ottmar Strauss (b. 1878 - d. 1941), Cologne [see note 3]; deposited at the Commerzbank, Cologne, where it remained for the duration of World War II [see note 4]; 1954, sold by Paul Weiden on behalf of Westra, A.G., Basel, to Rosenberg and Stiebel, New York [see note 5]; 1954, sold by Rosenberg and Stiebel to the MFA for $95,000. (Accession Date: December 9, 1954) NOTES: [1] According to a letter from Peter Kempf, Director, Fürstlich Hohenzollernsches Museum to Jean-Michel Tuchscherer of the MFA (September 25, 1984). [2] See F. A. Lehner, Fürstlich Hohenzollern'sches Museum zu Sigmaringen: Verzeichnis der Textilarbeiten (Sigmaringen, 1874), p. 4, cat. no. 2. [3] Georg Swarzenski, "Der Verkauf der Sigmaringer Sammlung," Zeitschrift für bildende Kunst 11/12 (1928-1929): 277. The tapestry was exhibited at the Städel in 1928; see Kurzes Verzeichnis der im Staedelschen Kunstinstitut ausgestellten Sigmaringer Sammlungen (Frankfurt, 1928), p. 100, cat. no. 1125. [4] See Elfi Pracht, "Ottmar Strauss: Industrieller, Staatsbeamter, Kunstsammler," Menora: Jahrbuch für deutsch-jüdische Geschichte 1994, p. 69, n. 50. Before fleeing Germany for Switzerland in 1936, Strauss sold most of his art collection in a series of auctions in Frankfurt. This tapestry, however, remained in his possession. Hermann Göring was interested in acquiring the work, but it remained in a Cologne bank vault throughout the Nazi era. [5] At his death, Strauss bequeathed the tapestry to his grandson, Stephan Kronenberg (see Pracht 1994, as above, n. 4). When the tapestry was sold in 1954, it was through the family's company; Westra had been founded as the Ottmar Strauss Corporation in 1950. Strauss's son, Ulrich, was president; Paul Weiden was his attorney.

    Credit Line

    Charles Potter Kling Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    100 x 490 cm (39 3/8 x 192 15/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    54.1431

    Medium or Technique

    Linen and wool slit tapestry

    Not On View

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    Europe, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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    Textiles

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  • Woman's jacket

    English
    about 1610–15, with later alterations

    Object Place: England

    Description

    Undyed linen embroidered with silver and gilt-silver yarns and spangles in daffodil scroll pattern, trimmed with metallic lace. Reconstructed with non-matching linen ground. Same embroidery pattern as 43.244a-b

    Provenance

    Originally with a member of the Wodehouse family, Kimberley, Norfolk, England [see note 1]. Early 20th century, purchased at Acton Surrey, Bond Street, London by Elizabeth Day McCormick (b. 1873 - d. 1957), Chicago [see note 2]; 1943, gift of McCormick to the MFA. (Accession date: October 14, 1943) NOTES: [1] Possibly worn by Grizell Wodehouse (d. 1635), the wife of Sir Philip Wodehouse. According to family legend, the jacket belonged to Queen Elizabeth and was given as a gift when she visited the Kimberly estate in 1578 for the knighting of Roger Wodehouse (d. 1588), Phillip's father. (See the "Elizabethan Inventories" by Leonard G. Bolingbroke, pg. 93; also, G. Townsend, MFA Bulletin, vol. XL, no. 238, April 1942, pg. 25-36). There is no evidence, however, that this provenance is true, particularly since the garment probably dates to after the queen's death. [2] According to a December 14th, 1941 letter from Elizabeth Day McCormick to Gertrude Townsend, the garment was said to be part of the "Kimberley Collection."

    Credit Line

    The Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Center back: 43 cm (16 15/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    43.243

    Medium or Technique

    Linen plain weave, embroidered with silk and metallic threads and spangles; metallic bobbin lace

    Not On View

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    Europe, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Découpé folding fan

    Italian or French
    About 1590–1600

    Object Place: Italy or France

    Description

    Many layers of stout skin leaf cut with bits of colored silk (and possibly mica) set into circular design representing reticella lace. Eight carved ivory sticks. Iron rivet with brass washer in form of flaming star.

    Provenance

    1976, Esther Oldham, Wellesley, MA; gift of Miss Oldham to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 9, 1976)

    Credit Line

    Oldham Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Length of guard: 30 cm (11 13/16 in.); maximum open: 44 cm (17 5/16 in.); arc: 110°

    Accession Number

    1976.182

    Medium or Technique

    Carved ivory sticks and cut skin leaf with silk plain weave and mica inserts

    Not On View

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    Europe, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Hunting carpet

    Rug

    Iranian
    Safavid Dynasty
    about 1530
    Probably designed by Aqa Mirak and Sultan Muhammad (Persian), For Shah Tahmasp (Persian, ruled 1524–1576)

    Object Place: Iran

    Description

    Scenes of hunting and feasting on this carpet reflect the pastimes of the Safavid court. The size of the carpet, the use of the silk throughout, and the exquisite workmanship (up to 810 knots per square inch) suggest that it was made for Shah Tahmasp (r. 1524–1576). Its rich pictorial patterns are thought to have been designed by the leading painters at the Safavid court.

    In the central medallion, highlighted with metallic threads, is a combat between dragons and phoenixes, a motif which reflects Chinese influence on Persian art. Within the blossoming vines of the surrounding field, novice hunters attack rabbits with clubs while more skilled hunters kill deer and antelope with spears and swords or battle lions barehanded.

    The relaxed atmosphere of the border design contrasts with the violent activity of the carpet’s center. Richly dressed courtiers eat and drink and, as described in Persian poetry, discuss the day’s hunting adventures.

    Provenance

    19th century, Torrigiani family, Florence; 1870s, sold by the Marchese Torrigiani to Stefano Bardini (b. 1836 - d. 1922), Florence [see note 1]; between 1877 and 1892, sold by Bardini to Adolphe de Rothschild (b. 1823 - d. 1900), Paris; by inheritance to his grand-nephew, Maurice de Rothschild (b. 1881 - d. 1957), Geneva. Between 1957 and 1966 acquired, probably from the Rothschild family, by Rosenberg and Stiebel, New York; 1966, sold by Rosenberg and Stiebel to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 13, 1966) NOTES: [1] Bardini offered the carpet to Wilhelm von Bode as early as 1877; this information was first provided to the MFA by Thomas J. Farnham, and the letter has been published by Valerie Niemeyer Chini, Stefano Bardini e Wilhelm Bode (Florence, 2009), p. 222, letter XV.11 (June 27, 1877); also see pp. 97-98. The carpet was in the Rothschild collection by 1892; see Wilhlem von Bode, Altpersische Knüpfteppiche (Berlin, 1892), p. 13. Bode later published Vorderasiatische Knüpfteppiche aus alter Zeit (Leipzig, 1902), noting (on p. 10) that about 25 years earlier, the Marchese Torrigiani had sold the carpet to Bardini for 150 francs, and that Bardini subsequently sold it to Rothschild for 30,000 francs.

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds from the Centennial Purchase Fund, John Goelet, and unrestricted textile purchase funds

    Details

    Dimensions

    480.1 x 225 cm (189 x 88 9/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    66.293

    Medium or Technique

    Silk warp and weft with silk knotted pile, with supplementary metal-wrapped patterning wefts

    Not On View

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    Asia, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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    Textiles

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  • Shawl

    Indian (Kashmiri)
    Mughal dynasty
    mid-17th century

    Object Place: Kashmir, India

    Description

    White shoulder mantle bordered with red flowers and hashia of serpentine buds.

    Provenance

    Anonymous collector, Boston; 1945, anonymous gift to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 14, 1945)

    Credit Line

    Anonymous gift in the name of Mrs. Arthur T. Cabot

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 241 x 126cm (94 7/8 x 49 5/8in.)

    Accession Number

    45.540

    Medium or Technique

    Cashmere twill tapestry

    Not On View

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    Asia, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Noh costume (atsuita)

    Japanese
    Edo period
    late 17th to early 18th century

    Object Place: Japan

    Description

    Noh theater robe for a male role (atsuita) with a green ground and overall design of peonies in light green, orange, pale blue, pale yellow and brown silk and undulating vertical lines (tatewaku) in white silk supplemental weft patterning. There is a reddish-orange plain-weave silk lining.

    Provenance

    Kuroda of Fukuoka Collection. By 1915, Yamanaka & Co., New York; 1915, sold by Yamanaka to the MFA, through William Sturgis Bigelow, Boston, [see note 1] for $7500 [see note 2]. (Accession date: October 7, 1915) NOTES: [1] Bigelow arranged the transaction and transport of the costumes on behalf of the MFA. [2] No. 13 on Yamanaka & Co. object list. Part of Yamanaka's "Complete Set" of Noh Isho and Men dresses (accession no. 15.1146 - 15.1164), purchased as a group for $7500. Costumes from the Hirose Collection were also purchased from Yamanaka & Co. at this time (accession no. 15.1165 - 15.1178), the total sale $9,969.25.

    Credit Line

    William Sturgis Bigelow Collection and Julia Bradford Huntington James Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    143.5 x 139.7 cm (56 1/2 x 55 in.)

    Accession Number

    15.1155

    Medium or Technique

    Silk twill with supplementary silk and gilt-paper wefts tied

    Not On View

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    Asia, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Dress and petticoat

    French
    about 1730

    Object Place: France

    Description

    Blue silk lampas with white floral motifs. Overdress: loose fitting bodice and full skirt; short fitted sleeves with gathered asymmetrical cuffs; sack (Watteau) back; worn over trimmed corset. Petticoat fullness knife pleated into blue linen waistband except at front. Blue linen partial linings.

    Provenance

    By 1930, purchased in Marseille, France by Elizabeth Day McCormick (1873 - 1957), Chicago; 1943, gift of McCormick to the MFA. (Accession date: October 14, 1943)

    Credit Line

    The Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Center back (Overdress): 152.5 cm (60 1/16 in.) Center back (Petticoat): 97 cm (38 3/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    43.664a-b

    Medium or Technique

    Silk lampas

    Not On View

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    Europe, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Embroidered overmantel with original frame

    American
    Colonial
    1745–50
    Embroidered by Eunice Bourne (born in 1732, died between 1773 and 1781)

    Object Place: Boston, New England colonies, New England colonies

    Description

    Embroidered overmantel with three scenes: spinning lady, fishing lady, and strolling couple. Worked in polychrome wool and silk in tent and knot stitches, with glass beads and metallic yarn. Original frame, wooden slats dividing scenes missing.

    Provenance

    1745-1750, with Mercy Gorham (b. 1695 - d. 1782), Barnstable, MA [see note 1]; 1782, by descent through the family [see note 2]; 1921, Miss Perdie E. Phinney [see note 3]; 1921, sold by Phinney to the MFA for $600. (Accession date: October 6, 1921) NOTES: [1] Eunice Bourne (b. 1732 - d. 1773-1781), Barnstable, was the daughter of Mercy Gorham and Col. Sylvanus Bourne (b. 1694 - d. 1763). The piece remained in her mother's house after her marriage to Capt. John Gallison (b. 1731 - d. 1786) in 1754 with whom she had thirteen children. [2] In 1782, Mercy Gorham probably willed the work to one of Eunice's daughters. According to the 1888 "Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families", Ed. C.F. Swift: "To her granddaughter Abigail Gallison, her mother's work, called a chimney piece." (pg. 117) [3] According to the MFA object card, Miss Phinney was a distant relative of Eunice Bourne. The "Genealogical Notes of Barnstable Families" notes that several paintings once owned by Sylvanus Bourne were in the possession of his ancestor, Major Sylvanus. B. Phinney. (pg. 118)

    Credit Line

    Seth K. Sweetser Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    63 x 129 cm (24 13/16 x 50 13/16 in.) (including frame)

    Accession Number

    21.2233

    Medium or Technique

    Linen plain weave, embroidered with wool, silk, metal-wrapped thread, and glass beads

    Not On View

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    Americas, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Man's wrapper

    African (Dida peoples)
    about 1900

    Object Place: Ivory Coast

    Description

    Plaited raffia man’s wrapper, tie-dyed with ochre colors, fringe at two ends.

    Provenance

    Before 2000, David Lantz, New York [see note 1]; 2000, sold by Lantz to the MFA (Accession date: March 22, 2000) NOTES: [1] Lantz acquired the object from a Japanese private collection.

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund, Textile Income Purchase Fund, The Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection, by exchange, and Alice J. Morse Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 151 x 151 cm (59 7/16 x 59 7/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    2000.575

    Medium or Technique

    Raffia, plaited and tie-dyed

    Not On View

    Collections

    Africa and Oceania, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Ceremonial hanging (palepai)

    Ship cloth

    Indonesian (Sumatran)
    Dutch colonial rule
    mid-19th century

    Object Place: Southern Sumatra (Lampong region), Indonesia

    Description

    Long, rectangular cotton cloth with design elements created by discontinuous supplementary weft patterning; primary design is of a pair of red ships with arching bow and stern, hulls decorated with yellow, blue, white spots and medallions, three architectural enclosures or shrines on deck which enclose human figures, leopards and buffalo, a single row of human and animal figures below deck; background motifs include fish and umbrellas.

    Palepai, or ship cloths, are ritual textiles which represent a belief in the concept of a “ship of the dead,” that would carry souls away to the afterlife. Palepai were traditionally displayed at rite of passage ceremonies.

    Provenance

    By 1980, in the collection of the Martin and Ullman Artweave Textile Gallery, New York; purchased from Artweave Gallery by the MFA (Accession date: April 16, 1980)

    Credit Line

    The William E. Nickerson Fund No. 2

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 73.7 x 382.3 cm (29 x 150 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1980.172

    Medium or Technique

    Cotton plain-weave ground with cotton discontinuous supplementary patterning wefts

    Not On View

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    Asia, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Woman's evening dress

    French (Paris)
    about 1865
    Mme. Roger (French, active in mid-19th century)

    Object Place: Paris, France

    Description

    Evening dress in two parts. Bodice and most of skirt of white satin with self figure of broad ribbon serpentines with crossing sprays of highly decorative flowers and fruit including pomegranate; bodice with low rounded neck in front, lower edge cut in tabs, sleeves elbow length with white chiffon forming top slightly puffed portion; skirt front of white satin cut straight with flounce of knife pleats along bottom edge, fullness of skirt at back in soft pleats, pleated puffs on side, bows of white satin finished with tassels of silk and artificial pearls, artificial pearl fringe along front edges of overskirt. Some additional trimming originally on dress, but now missing.

    Provenance

    Purchased in Paris between 1858 - 1861 by the parents of Fanny Crowninshield, (Mrs. John Quincy Adams II), (1839 - 1911), Boston [see note 1]; 1911, by descent to her daughter, Mrs. Robert Homans, Boston; 1946, gift of Mrs. Homans to MFA [see note 2]. (Accession date: February 14, 1946) NOTES: [1] See "Fashion Show: Paris Style," Boston: MFA, 2006, pg. 59-60. [2] In 1943, the MFA received eleven dresses from Mrs. Homans which were originally worn by her mother. Two, (including this example), were designed by Mme. Roger, Paris, the other nine by the House of Worth, Paris.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Robert Homans

    Details

    Dimensions

    Center back 24 11/16 in. (62.7 cm)

    Accession Number

    46.207a-b

    Medium or Technique

    Silk brocaded taffeta, tulle, satin and blond lace

    Not On View

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    Europe, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Pictorial quilt

    American (Athens, Georgia)
    1895–98
    Harriet Powers (American, 1837–1910)

    Object Place: Athens, Georgia, United States

    Description

    Appliqué quilt, dyed and printed cotton fabrics applied to cotton. The quilt is divided into fifteen pictorial rectangles. Worked with pieces of beige, pink, mauve, orange, dark red, gray-green and shades of blue cotton.

    This extraordinary quilt was created by Harriet Powers, an African American woman who was born a slave in Georgia in 1837. Powers is thought to have orally dictated a description of each square of her quilt to Jennie Smith, who had purchased the first quilt Powers made, and arranged for it to be exhibited at the Cotton States Exposition in Atlanta in 1895. This second quilt is thought to have been commissioned by a group of “faculty ladies” at Atlanta University, and given (together with Powers’s descriptions) as a gift to a retiring trustee. What follows is Powers’ descriptions of all fifteen blocks starting in the upper left and moving to the right.

    FIRST ROW:

    1. Job praying for his enemies. Job crosses. Job’s coffin.

    2. The dark day of May 19, 1780. The seven stars were seen 12 N. in the day. The cattle wall went to bed, chickens to roost and the trumpet was blown. The sun went off to a small spot and then to darkness.

    3. The serpent lifted up by Moses and women bringing their children to look upon it to be healed.

    4. Adam and Eve in the garden. Eve tempted by the serpent. Adam’s rib by which Eve was made. The sun and the moon. God’s all-seeing eye and God’s merciful hand.

    5. John baptizing Christ and the spirit of God descending and resting upon his shoulder like a dove.

    SECOND ROW:

    6. Jonah cast over board of the ship and swallowed by a whale. Turtles.

    7. God created two of every kind, male and female.

    8. The falling of the stars on Nov. 13, 1833. The people were frightened and thought that the end had come. God’s hand staid the stars. The varmints rushed out of their beds.

    9. Two of every kind of animal continued…camels, elephants, “gheraffs,” lions, etc.

    10. The angels of wrath and the seven vials. The blood of fornications. Seven-headed beast and 10 horns which arose of the water.

    THIRD ROW:

    11. Cold Thursday, 10 of February, 1895. A woman frozen while at prayer. A woman frozen at a gateway. A man with a sack of meal frozen. Icicles formed from the breath of a mule. All blue birds killed. A man frozen at his jug of liquor.

    12. The red light night of 1846. A man tolling the bell to notify the people of the wonder. Women, children and fowls frightened by God’s merciful hand caused no harm to them.

    13. Rich people who were taught nothing of God. Bob Johnson and Kate Bell of Virginia. They told their parents to stop the clock at one and tomorrow it would strike one and so it did. This was the signal that they had entered everlasting punishment. The independent hog which ran 500 miles from Georgia to Virginia, her name was Betts.

    14. The creation of animals continues.

    15. The crucifixion of Christ between the two theives. The sun went into darkness. Mary and Martha weeping at his feet. The blood and water run from his right side.

    Provenance

    About 1895-1898, Dr. Charles Cuthbert Hall (1852-1908), New York [see note 1]; 1908, by inheritance to his son, Reverend Basil Douglas Hall (b. 1888 - d. 1979), New York; between November 2, 1960 and February 7, 1961, sold by Hall to Maxim Karolik (b. 1893 - d. 1963), Boston; 1964, bequest of Karolik to MFA. (Accession date: May 13, 1964) NOTES: [1] Commissioned and purchased for Hall, President of the Union Theological Seminary in New York, by the faculty ladies of Atlanta University where he had served as chairman of the board of trustees.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Maxim Karolik

    Details

    Dimensions

    175 x 266.7 cm (68 7/8 x 105 in.)

    Accession Number

    64.619

    Medium or Technique

    Cotton plain weave, pieced, appliqued, embroidered, and quilted

    Not On View

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    Americas, Textiles and Fashion Arts

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  • Portière made from Morris & Co. Oak damask (one of four)

    English
    1892–93
    Embroidered by May Morris (English, 1862–1938), Designed by William Morris (English, 1834–1896)

    Object Place: England

    Description

    Silk yarns embroidered on green floral damask “Oak” designed by William Morris for Morris & Co., 1880-1881. Signed “MM” (May Morris, daughter). Eight long-trunk fruit trees bearing plums, pomegranates, apples, oranges(?), cherry blossoms; climbing vines. Inscription at top of panel: LO SILKEN MY GARDEN and SILKEN MY SKY AND SILKEN MY APPLE BOUGHS HANGING ON HIGH.

    Provenance

    1892, commissioned by Mrs. J. Monro Longyear (nee Mary Hawley Beecher, d. 1931), Marquette, MI [see note 1]; 1933, sold at Longyear's estate auction by Pierce S. Haley Appraiser and Auctioneer, Boston, MA, lot 4 under section "Draperies," to Mr. J. S. Gordon, Brookline, MA [see note 2]; by descent to Myron K. and Natalie G. Stone, New York; gift of the Stones in memory of J. S. and Sadye Z. Gordon (Accession date: March 9, 1983) NOTES: [1] In 1903, Mrs. Longyear moved her household in its entirety to Brookline, MA, at which point this embroidery came to MA. See "Early Modern Textiles: From Arts and Crafts to Art Deco," Marianne Carlano and Nicola J. Shilliam, MFA Publications, 1993, pg. 19, for a full description of provenance and a picture of the embroideries hanging in the Longyear home in 1909. [2] Copy of original auction catalogue and bill of sale in curatorial file.

    Credit Line

    In memory of J. S. and Sayde Z. Gordon from Myron K. and Natalie G. Stone

    Details

    Dimensions

    259.1 x 137.2 cm (102 x 54 in.) (including fringe)

    Accession Number

    1983.160d

    Medium or Technique

    Silk damask, embroidered with silk in darning, satin, stem, long-armed cross, buttonhole and couching, with silk fringe and cotton lining

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe, Textiles and Fashion Arts

    Classifications

    Textiles

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  • Panel from bedcover

    American
    1925–28
    Made by Marguerite Zorach (American, 1887–1968)

    Object Place: United States

    Description

    Polychrome wool embroidered on linen. Scene depics God and four angels looking down on the pursuits of the artist’s family on sea and land. Includes two figures on large sail boat below large fish. Other scenes of figures in landscape. SIGNED: MADE FOR HELEN HOOPER BROWN AND LATHROP BROWN IN THE YEARS 1925-1925 BY MARGUERITE ZORACH. Condition: Good, linen slightly soiled, especially top edge; tack holes around edges.

    Provenance

    About 1925-28, commissioned by Mrs. Lathrop Brown (Helen Hooper Brown), Boston [see note 1]. By about 1982, with Maddie Sadofski of Thanks For the Memories shop, Los Angeles, CA [see note 2]; sold by Sadofski to the MFA (Accession date: June 24, 1992) NOTES: [1] According to undated notes in the curatorial file. The bedspread originally had three additional side panels, which were cut off at an unknown date (possibly by the artist), but definitely after 1930, when the piece was published intact in "The Embroideries of Marguerite Zorach," Marya Mannes, International Studio, March 1930, pp. 29-33 (location not specified). Two of the side panels were joined to make 1992.351. [2] According to Tessim Zorach (the artist's son), the bedspread was not in the inventory of Zorach items in Mrs. Lathrop Brown's collection, which encompassed pieces "in a warehouse in New York for about 30 years." It is unclear when this inventory was completed. Further notes indicate that Sadofski had purchased 1992.351-352 about ten years before acquisition by the MFA.

    Credit Line

    Frank B. Bemis Fund

    Copyright

    Reproduced with permission.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Height x width: 90 1/2 x 71 5/8 in. (229.8 x 182 cm) (Maximum dimensions)

    Accession Number

    1992.352

    Medium or Technique

    Linen and wool, embroidered

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas, Textiles and Fashion Arts

    Classifications

    Textiles

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  • Length of furnishing fabric: Kaivo

    Finnish
    1965
    Designed by Maija Isola (Finnish, 1927–2001), Manufactured by Marimekko (Finnish, founded 1951)

    Object Place: Finland

    Description

    Screen-printed cotton with large-scale design of ovals and concentric crescent shapes in navy blue and brown on white ground. Printed in selvedge: “Maija Isola Design “Kaivo” © Marimekko Oy Suomi Finland 1965”

    Provenance

    October 1999, purchased from Ramsey Pavitt, Great Falls, VA by Susan Ward, Lexington, MA on eBay for the MFA (Accession date: June 21, 2000)

    Credit Line

    Textile Income Purchase Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    173.99 x 138.4 cm (68 1/2 x 54 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    2000.788

    Medium or Technique

    Screen-printed cotton plain weave

    Not On View

    Collections

    Contemporary Art, Europe, Textiles and Fashion Arts

    Classifications

    Textiles

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  • John Travolta

    American
    1978
    Ed Rossbach (American, 1914–2002)

    Object Place: United States

    Description

    Three-dimensional assemblage comprised of a tied reed “easel” upon which is attached a small square of silk organza, heat transfer printed with image of John Travolta’s face.

    Provenance

    July 1997, sold by Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA to Daphne Farago, Rhode Island and Florida; gift of Farago to the MFA (Accession date: June 23, 2004)

    Credit Line

    The Daphne Farago Collection

    Copyright

    Reproduced with permission.

    Details

    Dimensions

    40.6 x 22.9 x 17.8 cm (16 x 9 x 7 in.)

    Accession Number

    2004.428

    Medium or Technique

    Newspaper and reeds tied with cotton twine and electrical tape, and heat-transfer-printed silk plain weave (organza)

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas, Contemporary Art, Textiles and Fashion Arts

    Classifications

    Fiber arts

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  • Woman's bra top and necklace

    American
    about 1975
    Designed by Elsa Peretti (Italian, born in 1940), For Tiffany & Co. (American, active 1837–present)

    Object Place: New York, New York, United States

    Description

    Markings

    Tiffany & Co./©/STERLING/PERETTI on tab

    Provenance

    Purchased from Sudbury Antique Exchange; Gift to the MFA, June 23, 2004

    Credit Line

    Gift in honor of Elizabeth Ann Coleman

    Copyright

    Reproduced with permission.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 35.6 x 76.8 cm (14 x 30 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    2004.497.1-2

    Medium or Technique

    Silver mesh

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas, Contemporary Art, Europe, Textiles and Fashion Arts

    Classifications

    Costumes

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  • Woman's evening dress

    American (New York City)
    Spring 2001
    Designed by Geoffrey Beene (American, 1927–2004)

    Object Place: New York, New York

    Description

    Black matte jersey wrap gown with blue and lavender linen inserts at center front of bodice and skirt.

    Provenance

    Before 2004, Geoffrey Beene, New York; gift of Beene to the MFA (Accession date: October 27, 2004)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mr. Geoffrey Beene

    Copyright

    Reproduced with permission.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Center back: 109.2 cm (43 in.)

    Accession Number

    2004.694

    Medium or Technique

    Silk knit nit (jersey) and linen plain weave

    Not On View

    Collections

    Americas, Contemporary Art, Textiles and Fashion Arts

    Classifications

    Costumes

    More Info

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