• Explore the MFA’s collection of paintings by Claude Monet (1840-1926), one of the largest outside of Paris, which is representative of the various phases of the artist’s career: from his early forays into plein-air landscape painting in the 1860s, through his association with the Impressionists beginning in the 1870s, into the 1880s when he increasingly became interested in the effects of light on fixed subjects at different times of day, culminating in his series paintings of the 1890s and early twentieth century.

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  • View of the Sea at Sunset

    about 1862
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    lower right: cl. Monet

    Provenance

    August 25, 1891, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris; 1891-1907, with Durand-Ruel, Paris, no. 1429; September 7, 1907, sold by Durand-Ruel to William P. Blake, Boston; 1907-22, William P. Blake, Boston; 1922, bequest of William P. Blake. (Accession Date: June 1, 1922)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of William P. Blake in memory of his sister, Anne Dehon Blake

    Details

    Dimensions

    15.3 x 40 cm (6 x 15 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    22.604

    Medium or Technique

    Pastel on paper

    Not On View

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    Europe, Prints and Drawings

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    Pastels

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  • Broad Landscape

    about 1862
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower right: cl. Monet

    Provenance

    August 25, 1891, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris; 1891-1907, with Durand-Ruel, Paris, no. 1936; September 7, 1907, sold by Durand-Ruel to William P. Blake, Boston; 1907-22, William P. Blake, Boston; 1922, bequest of William P. Blake. (Accession Date: June 1, 1922)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of William P. Blake in memory of his sister, Anne Dehon Blake

    Details

    Dimensions

    17.4 x 35.9 cm (6 7/8 x 14 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    22.605

    Medium or Technique

    Pastel on paper

    Not On View

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    Europe, Prints and Drawings

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    Pastels

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  • Woodgatherers at the Edge of the Forest

    about 1863
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Although his early views of Normandy’s ports and beaches depicted light in the fractured manner that Monet was to perfect later in his career, this inland landscape of the same period is greatly simplified, its effects flattened and almost schematic. Monet used choppy, broad strokes of color and juxtaposed warm browns and greens against the blue of the sky, thus recalling the boldly painted landscapes of earlier artists like Courbet.

    Inscription

    Lower right: C. Monet

    Provenance

    Amanté, Paris [see note 1]. A. and R. Ball, New York [see note 2]. By 1961, Harold Kaplan, Boston; 1968, gift from Harold Kaplan to the Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA; 1968, sold by Rose Art Museum to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 12, 1974) NOTES: [1] Daniel Wildenstein, "Claude Monet: Biographie et catalogue raisonné," vol. 1, 1840-1881 (Paris, 1974), p. 128, cat. no. 18. [2] John Rewald, "The History of Impressionism" (New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1961), p. 97.

    Credit Line

    Henry H. and Zoe Oliver Sherman Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    59.7 x 90.2 cm (23 1/2 x 35 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1974.325

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on panel

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Rue de la Bavole, Honfleur

    about 1864
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Dating from the beginning of Monet’s career, this view of a street in the old port of Honfleur is a relatively traditional subject painted with great simplicity and directness. Monet’s palette of pure, contrasting colors is a radical departure from the traditional practice of building up an overall tonality through delicate gradations of color.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet

    Provenance

    1867, possibly Frédéric Bazille (b. 1841 - d. 1870), Paris [see note 1]. Until 1897, possibly Aimé Diot, Paris; March 8-9, 1897, possibly posthumous Diot sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 102 [see note 2]. About 1901, with Arthur Tooth and Sons [see note 3]; November 21, 1902, sold by Tooth to Durand-Ruel, Paris; August 12, 1912, sold by Durand-Ruel to Galerie Thannhauser, Munich [see note 4]; 1915, probably sold by Thannhauser to Oscar Schmitz (b. 1861 - d. 1933), Dresden [see note 5]; 1936, sold by the estate of Oscar Schmitz to Wildenstein and Co., Paris and New York [see note 6]; 1940, sold by Wildenstein to John Taylor Spaulding (b. 1870 - d. 1948), Boston; 1948, bequest of John Taylor Spaulding to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 3, 1948) NOTES: [1] This painting, or a closely-related variant (Mannheim, Städtische Kunsthalle), is depicted in Bazille's "The Artist's Studio, Rue Visconti, Paris" of 1867 (Richmond, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts). [2] See Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: catalogue raisonné" (1996), vol. 2, p. 21, cat. no. 33. [3] The painting was probably with the Paris branch of this London-based gallery. The dates of the Durand-Ruel transactions are taken from Henri Loyrette and Gary Tinterow, "Origins of Impressionism, 1859-1869" (exh cat. Réunion des Musées Nationaux, Paris and Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1994-1995), p. 425. cat. no. 124. [4] While with the Galerie Thannhauser, the painting was published by Georg Biermann, "Die Kunst auf dem internationalen Markt. Gemälde aus dem Besitz der modernen Galerie Thannhauser, München," Der Cicerone, no. 21 (May 1913), p. 325 and in the Katalog der Modernen Galerie Heinrich Thannhauser München (Munich, 1916), cat. no. 26; see below, n. 5. [5] According to "La Collection Oscar Schmitz" (exh. cat., Wildenstein and Co., Paris, 1936), p. 90, cat. no. 40, Schmitz acquired the painting in 1915. Though it was illustrated in the Katalog der Modernen Galerie Heinrich Thannhauser München, published in 1916 (see above, n. 4), it is still quite possible that Schmitz purchased the painting from Thannhauser in 1915, after the gallery catalogue went to press but before its publication in 1916. [6] A large portion of the Schmitz collection was for sale as early as 1934. In 1936, Wildenstein acquired it and held the exhibition "La Collection Oscar Schmitz" (as above, n. 5). See Heike Biedermann, "Die Sammlungen Adolf Rothermundt und Oscar Schmitz in Dresden," in "Die Modernen und ihre Sammler: Französische Kunst im deutschem Privatbesitz vom Kaiserreich zur Weimarer Republik," ed. Andrea Pophanken and Felix Billeter (Berlin, 2001), 213-222.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of John T. Spaulding

    Details

    Dimensions

    55.9 x 61.0 cm (22 x 24 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.580

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Ships in a Harbor

    about 1873
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Most likely painted in 1873 at the port of Monet’s native Le Havre on theNormandy coast, this picture conjures an overcast day not with the expected palette of grays but with a range of blues, purples, greens, and muted pinks. These unblended pigments are laid down in parallel strokes to create the illusion of ripples in the water and the effect of masts backlit against the cloudy sky. Unblended strokes of color like these would become one of the hallmarks of Monet’s mature Impressionist style.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet

    Provenance

    1880, purchased from the artist by Durand-Ruel, Paris, no. 1234. By 1893, Erwin Davis, New York; March 16, 1893, sold by Davis to Durand-Ruel, New York; 1893-97, with Durand-Ruel, New York, no. 1032; May 28, 1897, sold by Durand-Ruel to Denman W. Ross, Cambridge, Mass.; 1897-1906, Denman W. Ross collection, Cambridge, Mass.; 1906, gift of Denman W. Ross. (Accession Date: March 8, 1906)

    Credit Line

    Denman Waldo Ross Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    49.8 x 61 cm (19 5/8 x 24 in.)

    Accession Number

    06.117

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Snow at Argenteuil

    about 1874
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Painted not far from his house in Argenteuil, and likely begun outdoors, this work demonstrates Monet’s interest in the changing effects of light and weather. Primed with a light-gray ground, the canvas can be seen through some of the thinly applied brushstrokes, while quick dabs of pigment and larger sweeps of color define the objects and the people. The path situates the viewer in the scene. The fence and meadow act as a framing device, so that like the pedestrians (and like the artist himself, as he painted) we can feel the cold, damp air and falling snow. Monet’s decision to depict a snowfall in progress, and not simply a winter scene of fallen snow, reflects the influence of Japanese Ukiyo-e prints.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet

    Provenance

    April 29, 1890, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 305) [see note 1]; July 4, 1890, sold by Durand-Ruel to Annette (Anna) Perkins Rogers (b. 1840 - d. 1920), Boston [see note 2]; 1921, bequest of Anna Perkins Rogers to the MFA. (Accession Date: July 7, 1921) NOTES: [1] According to a letter from Durand-Ruel, Paris, to the MFA (1962). [2] The letter from Durand-Ruel (see above, n. 1) gives the date of the painting's sale to "Mr. P. Rogers" as June 14, but a dated receipt in the MFA object file confirms that it was sold to Miss [Anna] P. Rogers on July 4, 1890.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Anna Perkins Rogers

    Details

    Dimensions

    54.6 x 73.7 cm (21 1/2 x 29 in.)

    Accession Number

    21.1329

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Camille Monet and a Child in the Artist's Garden in Argenteuil

    1875
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Camille, Monet’s first wife, is shown with a child in the garden of their house in Argenteuil, near Paris, where they lived between 1872 and 1877. The shimmering reds, blues, greens, and white that capture the brilliance of a sun-drenched day are applied with many small brushstrokes, whose varied shapes create the different textures of flowers, grass, and clothing.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 75

    Provenance

    October 1875, possibly sold by the artist to Clément Courtois, Mulhouse [see note 1]. Julius Oehme, Paris. 1900, with Durand-Ruel, Paris and New York. By 1905, Desmond FitzGerald (b. 1846 - d. 1926), Brookline, MA [see note 2]; April 21, 1927, FitzGerald sale, American Art Association, New York, lot 187, sold for $12,000 to Edwin Sibley Webster (b. 1867 - d. 1950) and Jane Hovey Webster (b. 1870 - d. 1969), Newton, MA; by descent to an anonymous donor, New York; 1976, year-end, anonymous gift to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 12, 1977) NOTES: [1] The provenance given here (to 1927) is taken from Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: Catalogue Raisonné" (1996), vol. 2, p. 157, cat. no. 382. [2] He lent the painting to the exhibition "Loan Collection of Paintings by Claude Monet and Eleven Sculptures by Auguste Rodin," Copley Society, Boston, March 1905, cat. no. 29.

    Credit Line

    Anonymous gift in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Webster

    Details

    Dimensions

    55.3 x 64.7 cm (21 3/4 x 25 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1976.833

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Boulevard Saint-Denis, Argenteuil, in Winter

    1875
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    The Impressionist interest in specific effects of light and weather is evident in Monet’s rendering of the exact moment in which the sun struggles to break through a light snowfall. He made a preparatory sketch for this painting; clearly, careful deliberation lay behind his seemingly spontaneous technique. The subject of falling snow and the figures with umbrellas are reminiscent of Japanese woodblock prints, which had a strong influence on Impressionist artists.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet 90

    Provenance

    By 1888, Henri Kapferer, Paris [see note 1]; July 17, 1888, sold by Kapferer to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 1688) [see note 2]; September 25, 1890, sold by Durand-Ruel to Joseph Foxcroft Cole (b. 1837 - d. 1892) for Peter Chardon Brooks (b. 1831 - d. 1920), Boston; by descent to his daughter, Eleanor Brooks (Mrs. Richard M.) Saltonstall, Boston [see note 3]; by descent to her son, Richard Saltonstall (b. 1897 - d. 1982), Boston; 1978, gift of Richard Saltonstall to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 10, 1978) NOTES: [1] According to notes in the MFA curatorial file, Kapferer might have acquired this directly from the artist. [2] The provenance information given here (between 1888 and 1890) is taken from Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: catalogue raisonné" (1996), vol. 2, p. 148, cat. no. 357a. [3] She first lent this painting to the MFA in 1920.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Richard Saltonstall

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Wildenstein 1996, no. 357a

    Dimensions

    60.9 x 81.6 cm (24 x 32 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1978.633

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Meadow with Poplars

    about 1875
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    This painting is an early representation of grainstacks and poplars, subjects to which Monet would return in his series paintings of the 1890s. But this landscape reflects his primary concern in the 1870s: rendering air and depth through color. Contrasting highlights (red and green, purple and yellow), picked out in bright impasto, seem to bring the foreground closer to the viewer, while cool tones of more fluidly applied paint suggest the background’s recession to a hazy distance.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet

    Provenance

    1878, sold by the artist to M. Du Fresnay [see note 1]; 1894, sold by Du Fresnay to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 3060); from Durand-Ruel, Paris to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 1234); 1897, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to J. Eastman Chase Gallery, Boston [see note 2], for Clara Bertram Kimball, Boston; by inheritance to her husband, David P. Kimball (d. 1923), Boston; 1923, bequest of David P. Kimball to the MFA [see note 3]. (Accession Date: November 1, 1923) NOTES: [1] See Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: catalogue raisonné" (1996), vol. 2, p. 155, cat. no. 378. [2] The information about Durand-Ruel's transactions comes from a letter from Durand-Ruel, Paris, to the MFA (April 18, 1962; in MFA curatorial file). [3] In 1923 David P. Kimball bequeathed forty paintings to the MFA in memory of his wife, Clara Bertram Kimball. He noted in his will that these were "from the collection made by her and bequeathed to me."

    Credit Line

    Bequest of David P. Kimball in memory of his wife Clara Bertram Kimball

    Details

    Dimensions

    54.6 x 65.4 cm (21 1/2 x 25 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    23.505

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • La Japonaise (Camille Monet in Japanese Costume)

    1876
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Monet exhibited this work at the second group show of the Impressionist painters in 1876, where it attracted much attention. Large-scale figure paintings had traditionally been considered the most significant challenge for an artist. Using this format, Monet created a virtuoso display of brilliant color that is also a witty comment on the current Paris fad for all things Japanese. The woman shown wrapped in a splendid kimono and surrounded by fans is Monet’s wife, Camille, wearing a blond wig to emphasize her Western identity.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 1876

    Provenance

    April 14, 1876, Monet and Ernest Hoschedé sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 37 [see note 1]. April 19, 1877, anonymous ("L.") sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 48, to Constantin de Rasty (d. 1923), Paris; 1918, sold by Rasty to Paul Rosenberg and Co., Paris and New York [see note 2]; 1920, sold by Rosenberg to Philip Lehman (b. 1861 - d. 1947), New York [see note 3]; 1921, sold by Lehman to Duveen Brothers, Inc., London [see note 4]; 1937, shipped from Duveen, London to Duveen, New York; 1956, sold by Duveen to the MFA for $45,000. (Accession Date: March 8, 1956) NOTES: [1] Traditionally referred to as Monet's sale, the auction was organized by Ernest Hoschedé (b. 1837 - d. 1891) and included several works belonging to him, leading Hélène Adhemar ("Ernest Hoschedé," in Aspects of Monet: A Symposium on the Artist's Life and Times, ed. John Rewald and Frances Weitzenhoffer [New York: Abrams, 1984], p. 61) to suggest it was a joint sale and Hoschedé "was without a doubt in possession of the Monet paintings" ("il était sans doute en possession des tableaux de Monet"). When the painting was acquired, Edward Fowles of Duveen Brothers stated that "it was originally in the collection of a Mr. Hoschede" (letter to W. G. Constable, MFA, February 16, 1956). [2] René Gimpel noted on August 10, 1918, that the dealer Georges Bernheim informed him that "Rosenberg has bought a life-size Monet, a Japanese woman." See his "Diary of an Art Dealer", trans. John Rosenberg (New York, 1966), p. 55; also pp. 59 (August 19) and 67 (October 29). Monet himself wrote to Rosenberg about the painting (August 6, 1918, copy of letter in curatorial file). [3] In the brief notice "New Monet for New York," American Art News XVIII, no. 18 (February 21, 1920): p. 1, the painting is said to have "recently been purchased by a New York collector." Edward Fowles (as above, n. 1) stated that "Philip Lehman purchased it from Paul Rosenberg." [4] According to a memo from the London office to the Paris office of Duveen Brothers (December 31, 1926, Duveen Brothers Records, Getty Research Institute, Box 267, folder 24). The official sale date is given, in a memo to the New York branch of the gallery (December 13, 1937), as January 1, 1922.

    Credit Line

    1951 Purchase Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    231.8 x 142.3 cm (91 1/4 x 56 in.)

    Accession Number

    56.147

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Entrance to the Village of Vétheuil in Winter

    1879
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    In Vétheuil, a town farther down the Seine than Argenteuil and hence still untouched by signs of modernity, Monet painted no suburban gardens or sailboat regattas. A sweep of country road leading into the village, bordered by messy stretches of grasses and weeds sodden with melting snow, takes up the bottom half of the picture. The eye is not held by the colors and texture present in the foreground but rushes past, only to be stopped by the phalanx of houses constituting the village, their rectilinear forms hastily sketched in blue. Perspective here is exaggerated, with the point of view chosen so that the roadway covers what seems a disproportionate area of the canvas. Monet could have seen such a composition in nineteenth-century Japanese woodblock prints that were being imported in France in large numbers.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet

    Provenance

    February 1880, sold by the artist to Charles Bonnemaison Bascle, Paris; May 3, 1890, Bonnemaison Bascle sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 33, sold for fr. 1,020 to Boussod, Valadon et Cie., Paris and New York (stock no. 20705); April 11, 1891, sold by Boussod, Valdon et Cie. to Williams and Everett, Boston [see note 1]; 1891, sold by Williams and Everett to James M. Prendergast (b. 1851 - d. 1920), Boston [see note 2]; 1920, by inheritance to his sister, Julia Catherine Prendergast (b. 1859 - d. 1943), Boston; 1921, gift of Julia C. Prendergast to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 18, 1921) NOTES: [1] Getty Provenance Index, Goupil et Cie. records, GI Record no. G-30094 (stock book 12, no. 20705, p. 156), as "Effet de Neige." [2] James Prendergast lent this painting to "A Loan Exhibition of Pictures by Claude Monet" (St. Botolph Club, Boston, February 6-23, 1899), cat. no. 7, as "Village Road (Winter)" and the "Loan Collection of Paintings by Claude Monet" (Copley Society of Boston, March 1905), cat. no. 91, as "Entree du Village de Vetheuil."

    Credit Line

    Gift of Julia C. Prendergast in memory of her brother, James Maurice Prendergast

    Details

    Dimensions

    60.6 x 81 cm (23 7/8 x 31 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    21.7

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Cliffs of the Petites Dalles

    1880
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 1880

    Provenance

    By 1894 with Durand-Ruel (New York, NY, USA; Paris, France); 1894 - 1906 Denman W. Ross (Cambridge, MA, USA) from Durand-Ruel; 1906 - Boston, MA, USA. Museum of Fine Arts (gift of Ross) (Accession date: March 8, 1906)

    Credit Line

    Denman Waldo Ross Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    60.6 x 80.3 cm (23 7/8 x 31 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    06.116

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Flower Beds at Vétheuil

    1881
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    In 1878 Monet went to live in the town of Vétheuil, west of Paris along the Seine. The town provided him with an escape from city life and an opportunity to cultivate the riverbank garden whose climbing nasturtiums he represented with swirls and splashes of orange in this composition. When a friend asked if he might visit Monet’s studio at Vétheuil, the artist retorted, “My studio! But I’ve never had one, and I don’t understand how anyone could shut themselves into a room—perhaps to draw but not to paint.”

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 81

    Provenance

    1881 or 1891, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris [see note 1]; 1913, sold by Durand-Ruel to John Pickering Lyman (b. 1847? - d. 1914), Portsmouth, NH; 1914, by descent to Theodora Lyman (d. 1919), Portsmouth; 1919, gift of Miss Theodora Lyman to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 18, 1919) NOTES: [1] According to Daniel Wildenstein, "Claude Monet: Biographie et catalogue raisonné" (Paris, 1974), p. 410, cat. no. 693, Monet sold this painting to Durand-Ruel in December, 1881. Notes in the MFA curatorial file give the date as 1891.

    Credit Line

    The John Pickering Lyman Collection—Gift of Miss Theodora Lyman

    Details

    Dimensions

    Unframed: 92.1 x 73.3 cm (36 1/4 x 28 7/8 in.) Framed: 93 cm (36 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.1313

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Seacoast at Trouville

    1881
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    A single tree, deformed by the constant buffeting of onshore winds, is the central motif of this painting by Monet. Because the horizon line is effaced in a haze of creamy blue strokes, there is no sense of recession into the distance. Such an abstract field behind the tree deprives it of volume, so that it reads as a flat pattern on the surface. This pattern is so dominant that its outline determines the shapes of other forms in the painting. Not only do the low blue bushes that extend from one edge of the canvas to the other echo the general form of the tree’s foliage, but the very ground answers the bending motion in low hillocks parallel or related to the tree’s angle. Although the tree’s form is dominant and determines so many other shapes in the painting, the tree in itself is almost ephemeral, for it is barely rooted in the soil. The painting is thus an exercise in pattern making rather than a naturalistic description of a place.

    Inscription

    Lower right: 81. Claude Monet

    Provenance

    By June 1882, possibly sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris, France; August 1883, sold by Durand-Ruel, Paris, to Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, France. By 1888, Leroux, Paris; February 27-28, 1888, sold at Leroux sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, no. 61, and bought by Durand-Ruel, Paris; 1888, most likely sold by Durand-Ruel to Mrs. Catholina Lambert, Paterson, NJ; February 28, 1899, sold by Mrs. Catholina Lambert to Durand-Ruel, New York; from 1899 through 1907, with Durand-Ruel, New York, no. 2122; April 13, 1907, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to John Pickering Lyman, Portsmouth, N.H.; 1907 John Pickering Lyman, Portsmouth, NH (d. 1914); 1914, after his death, inherited by Miss Theodora Lyman (d. 1919); 1919, gift of Theodora Lyman. (Accession Date: September 18, 1919)

    Credit Line

    The John Pickering Lyman Collection—Gift of Miss Theodora Lyman

    Details

    Dimensions

    60.7 x 81.3 cm (23 7/8 x 32 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.1314

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Fisherman's Cottage on the Cliffs at Varengeville

    1882
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Summertime often drew Monet to the English Channel coast, and in 1881 and 1882 he explored the area around Dieppe, situated about ninety-six kilometers to the east along the coast from Le Havre. For the purpose of giving focus to the scenes he painted in Pourville and Varengeville, west of Dieppe, Monet liked the stone cabins that had been built during the Napoleonic era as posts from which to observe coastal traffic. In Monet’s day they were used by fishermen for storage. The door and flanking windows anthropomorphize the cottage, giving it a nose and two eyes. We may see the cottage, but we cannot reach it, for there is no path. Indeed, all we can do is admire the view out to sea. The Channel, dotted with recreational yachts, sparkles in the distance. The cottage, especially its roof, is given an orange hue, which it may truly have possessed but which makes a striking contrast of complementaries with the blue of the water on the horizon.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 1882

    Provenance

    October 1882, possibly sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris [see note 1]; August 1883, possibly sold by Durand-Ruel to Galerie Georges Petit, Paris. 1890, Georges de Porto-Riche (b. 1849 - d. 1930), Paris; May 14, 1890, Porto-Riche sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, lot 22, to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 357); July 4, 1890, sold by Durand-Ruel to Annette (Anna) Perkins Rogers (b. 1840 - d. 1920), Boston; 1921, bequest of Anna Perkins Rogers to the MFA. (Accession Date: July 7, 1921) NOTES: [1] The provenance given here (through 1890) is taken from Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: catalogue raisonné" (1996), vol. 2, pp. 299-300, cat. no. 808.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Anna Perkins Rogers

    Details

    Dimensions

    60.6 x 81.6 cm (23 7/8 x 32 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    21.1331

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Road at La Cavée, Pourville

    1882
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Monet had begun to experiment with X-shaped compositions as early as 1863-64. Here, almost twenty years later, he has refined the schema and simultaneously clothed it in an active surface pattern of indescribable subtlety. Despite the uncertain continuance of the path, this is a welcoming, pleasant place. The path nestles between two soft mounds. In the Western tradition, landforms are often discussed in sensuous terms in relation to the human body. By this date Monet’s paintings only rarely included the human figure. If one were present here, the scene would take on an anecdotal air, and the force of the geometry and suggestiveness of the landscape would be diminished. Without a figure, this painting invites, seduces, comforts, and promises, on an optical as well as an animal level, the component parts of which are impossible to disentangle.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet 82

    Provenance

    October 10, 1882, possibly sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris and sold in 1883 [see note 1]. 1888, Georges Girard, Paris; March 9, 1888, sold by Girard to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 1445); 1888, sold by Durand-Ruel, Paris, to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock nos. 408 and 346); June 6, 1888, sold by Durand-Ruel to Williams and Everett, Boston. By 1898, Charles Fairchild (b. 1838 - d. 1910), Boston, Newport, and New York [see note 2]; October 22, 1900, sold by Charles Fairchild to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 2373); April 3, 1903, sold by Durand-Ruel to William Caleb Loring (b. 1851 - d. 1930), Beverly, MA; by descent to his wife, Susan Mason Loring (b. 1852 - d. 1923), Beverly; 1924, bequest of Mrs. Susan Mason Loring to the MFA. (Accession Date: March 6, 1924) NOTES: [1] The provenance was provided in a letter from Paul Durand-Ruel, Durand-Ruel et Cie., to the MFA (December 6, 2001). According to this letter, Monet sold the Galerie Durand-Ruel four paintings titled "Chemin de la Cavée, Pourville" on October 10, 1882, all of which were sold by the gallery in 1883. As no photographic records exist from that time it is not possible to state definitively that the MFA painting was one of the four sold. [2] The painting was first consigned by Mr. Fairchild to Durand-Ruel on December 3, 1898.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Mrs. Susan Mason Loring

    Details

    Dimensions

    60.3 x 81.6 cm (23 3/4 x 32 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    24.1755

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Cap Martin, near Menton

    1884
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    This picture belongs to a group Monet painted on the French Riviera in April 1884. We stand on the eastern side of the cape, looking across the bay towards the Maritime Alps. Monet was drawn back to the Mediterranean coast, which he had visited with Renoir the previous December, for the intensity of its light. To suggest the sky’s airy expanse, he left much of the upper portion in reserve, indicating the contours of cloud and mountain with a few sketchy strokes.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet 84

    Provenance

    May 1884, possibly sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris; September 1886, possibly sent by Durand-Ruel to the American Art Association, New York [see note 1]. By 1891, acquired, probably from the American Art Association, by James F. Sutton (b. 1849 - d. 1915), New York [see note 2]; 1915, by inheritance to his widow, Florence Macy Sutton (b. about 1853), New York; January 17, 1917, Sutton sale, American Art Association, New York, lot 144, to Durand-Ruel, New York; 1917, sold by Durand-Ruel to Robert J. Edwards (d. 1924), Hannah Marcy Edwards (d. 1929), and Grace Edwards (d. 1938), Boston; 1925, bequest and gift of the Edwards to the MFA [see note 3]. (Accession Date: April 2, 1925) NOTES: [1] See Daniel Wildenstein, Monet: Catalogue Raisonné (1996), vol. 2: 335-336, no. 897. [2] James Sutton was one of the founding members of the American Art Association in New York. He certainly owned the painting by 1891, when he lent it to an exhibition at the Union Club, New York (Feb. 12-14, 1891). [3] Durand-Ruel sold this painting to "the Misses Edwards" in 1917 (letter from Herbert Elfers, Durand-Ruel, to Charles C. Cunningham, MFA, August 22, 1939). It was subsequently lent to the MFA under the name of Robert Edwards. Siblings Robert (d. 1924), Hannah (d. 1929), and Grace (d. 1938) Edwards were each collectors of art, who seemed to have had joint ownership of the objects in their possession. When Robert died, he bequeathed his collection to the MFA in memory of their mother, Juliana Cheney Edwards. In 1925, after his death, part of his collection was acquired by the Museum, and the remainder went to his sisters, with the understanding that the objects would ultimately be left to the MFA in the collection begun in memory of their mother. The collections of Hannah and Grace were left to the MFA in 1939, following Grace's death. It is not always possible to determine exactly which paintings each sibling had owned.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    67.2 x 81.6 cm (26 7/16 x 32 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    25.128

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Poppy Field in a Hollow near Giverny

    1885
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Monet and his fellow Impressionists believed that art should express its own time and place and that it should do so in an appropriately modern style. In the 1860s and 1870s, working primarily outdoors, the Impressionists observed that objects seen in strong light lose definition and appear to blend into one another. No clear outlines exist in this sunny landscape. Its forms and textures are suggested by the size, shape, and direction of the brushstrokes, and the juxtaposition of complementary reds and greens gives the painting a vibrant intensity. By the mid-1880s, most members of the original group had turned away from Impressionism, but Monet declared: “I am still an Impressionist and will always remain one.”

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 85

    Provenance

    September 1885, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris [see note 1]; probably sold by Durand-Ruel to Mr. and Mrs. Albert Spencer, Paris and New York [see note 2]; March 24, 1911, sold by Mrs. Spencer to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 9548); 1911, sold by Durand-Ruel, Paris to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 3459); 1911, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to Arthur B. Emmons (d. 1922), Newport, R.I. [see note 3]; January 14-15, 1920, Emmons sale, American Art Association, New York, lot 31, to Durand-Ruel for Robert Jacob Edwards (d. 1924), Boston; 1925, bequest of Robert J. Edwards to the MFA. [see note 4] (Accession Date: April 2, 1925) NOTES: [1] Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: Catalogue Raisonné" (1996), vol. 3, p. 377, cat. no. 1000. [2] Albert Spencer is mentioned among the collectors with whom Durand-Ruel dealt by Anne Distel, "Impressionism: The First Collectors," trans. Barbara Perroud-Benson (New York: Abrams, 1990), 242. According to Wildenstein (as above, n. 1) the Spencers owned the painting by 1886. [3] A handwritten note in the curatorial file (November 14, 1939) states that, according to Herbert Elfers of Durand-Ruel, this painting was purchased from Durand-Ruel, Paris, on September 16, 1911 and sold to Emmons on September 29, 1911. However, according to a later letter from Durand-Ruel to the MFA (1962), the sale to Emmons was on August 23, 1911. [4] Siblings Robert (d. 1924), Hannah (d. 1929), and Grace (d. 1938) Edwards were each collectors of art, who seemed to have had joint ownership of the objects in their possession. When Robert died, he bequeathed his collection to the MFA in memory of their mother, Juliana Cheney Edwards. In 1925, after his death, part of his collection was acquired by the Museum, and the remainder went to his sisters, with the understanding that the objects would ultimately be left to the MFA in the collection begun in memory of their mother. The collections of Hannah and Grace were left to the MFA in 1939, following Grace's death. It is not always possible to determine exactly which paintings each sibling had owned.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    W. 1000

    Dimensions

    65.1 x 81.3 cm (25 5/8 x 32 in.)

    Accession Number

    25.106

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Meadow with Haystacks near Giverny

    1885
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    In this painting of primarily blue, green, and violet hues, the eye is drawn to the lighter and brighter streaks of yellow. These represent sunlight that has broken through the trees on the right, trees that glow from within with captured light. Color and light had always been Monet’s primary interests; at Giverny in the mid-1880s, he began to give himself up entirely to their exploration.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet 85

    Provenance

    December 1885, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris [see note 1]. 1886, with Bernheim-Jeune, Paris. 1886, with Durand-Ruel, New York. 1897, J. Eastman Chase Gallery, Boston. By 1899, acquired by Lilla Cabot Perry (b. 1848 - d. 1933) for her brother, Arthur Tracy Cabot (b. 1852 - d. 1912), Boston [see note 2]; by inheritance to his widow, Susan Shattuck Cabot; 1942, bequest of Arthur Tracy Cabot to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 12, 1942) NOTES: [1] The provenance given here (through 1897) is taken from Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: catalogue raisonné" (1996), vol. 3, cat. no. 995. [2] According to a letter from Henry L. Shattuck to W. G. Constable of the MFA (November 23, 1942; in MFA curatorial file), Lilla Cabot Perry acquired this painting for her brother. He lent it to the exhibition "A Loan Exhibition of Pictures by Claude Monet," St. Botolph Club, Boston, February 6 - 23, 1899, cat. no. 2.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Arthur Tracy Cabot

    Details

    Dimensions

    74.0 x 93.5 cm (29 1/8 x 36 13/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    42.541

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Meadow at Giverny

    1886
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    “Meadow at Giverny” does not have an obvious focal point: no figure, structure, or natural feature attracts the viewer’s attention. The high-keyed palette and, especially, the insistence on pattern further contribute to our sense of it as a decorative painting, in the best sense of the term - as a work concerned, above all, with the very qualities of color and pattern. It is also a painting of loneliness. The only element that breaks from the pattern of horizontals is the tree in the background that frees itself from its neighbors. Were the tree a human figure, it could be described as displaying itself against the sky in a gesture of defiance or triumph. A tree is not a human being, of course, yet the temptation to read the one for the other is strong. This tree is isolated, mirroring the position of the viewer looking at this deserted, if colorful, meadow.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet

    Provenance

    1898, purchased from the artist by Galerie Georges Petit, Bernheim-Jeune, and Montaignac, Paris (?). With Jos Hessel, Paris. By 1914, Alexandre Berthier, Prince de Wagram (d. 1918), Paris; April 14, 1914, sold by Berthier to Durand-Ruel, Paris, (stock no. 10519); November 11, 1915, transferred from Durand-Ruel, Paris, to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 3897); March 20; 1916, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York, to Hannah Marcy Edwards (d. 1929), Boston; 1929, by inheritance to Grace M. Edwards (d. 1938), Boston; 1939, bequest of Hannah M. Edwards to the MFA [see note 1]. (Accession Date: October 11, 1939) NOTES: [1] Siblings Robert (d. 1924), Hannah (d. 1929), and Grace (d. 1938) Edwards were each collectors of art, who seemed to have had joint ownership of the objects in their possession. When Robert died, he bequeathed his collection to the MFA in memory of their mother, Juliana Cheney Edwards. In 1925, after his death, part of his collection was acquired by the Museum, and the remainder went to his sisters, with the understanding that the objects would ultimately be left to the MFA in the collection begun in memory of their mother. The collections of Hannah and Grace were left to the MFA in 1939, following Grace's death. It is not always possible to determine exactly which paintings each sibling had owned.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    92.1 x 81.6 cm (36 1/4 x 32 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    39.670

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Antibes, Afternoon Effect

    1888
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    “I am painting the town of Antibes,” Monet wrote to his companion, Alice Hoschedé, in January, 1888, “a little fortified town all golden in the sun that stands out against beautiful blue and pink mountains and the eternally snow-capped range of the Alps.” Monet’s stay at Antibes, between Nice and Cannes on the French Riviera, lasted from January to May, allowing him to avoid the dreariest months of the year in Northern France and to satisfy his dealer’s appetite for idyllic, sun-drenched seascapes.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 88

    Provenance

    June 4, 1888, sold by the artist to Boussoud, Valadon et Cie., Paris (stock no. 19300); June 27, 1888, sold by Boussod, Valadon et Cie. to Madame Ellissen (probably Hortense Halfon Ellissen, b. 1858 - d. 1932), Paris [see note 1]. By 1892, Samuel Dacre Bush (b. 1849 - d. after 1931), Boston [see note 2]; 1927, gift of Samuel Dacre Bush to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 1, 1927) NOTES: [1] Getty Provenance Index, Goupil et Cie. records, PI Record No. G-28791 (stock book 12, no. 19300, p. 70). [2] He lent the painting to "An Exhibition of Paintings by Claude Monet" (Boston, St. Botolph Club, March 28 - April 9, 1892), cat. no. 14.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Samuel Dacre Bush

    Details

    Dimensions

    66 x 82.5 cm (26 x 32 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    27.1324

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Antibes Seen from the Plateau Notre-Dame

    1888
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Monet’s pale and delicate paintings from his second Mediterranean visit in 1888 are dominated by pink and light blue and a softened light, which he exploited for its unifying properties. The old fort in the town of Antibes was Monet’s favorite motif during this period, but in this work he reduced the structure and its surrounding building to thick, rhythmic touches of yellow and blue paint, choosing to focus on the drama of sunlight and shadow instead of the architecture of the town.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet 88

    Provenance

    1889, Georges Petit, Paris [see note 1]; September 19, 1889, sold by Georges Petit to M. Knoedler and Co., Paris and New York (stock no. 6301); November 1, 1890, sold by Knoedler to Doll and Richards, Boston (stock no. B2666) [see note 2]; November 1, 1890, sold by Doll and Richards to Joseph Foxcroft Cole (b. 1837 - d. 1892), Boston [see note 3]; by inheritance to his daughter, Adelaide H. L. A. de Pelgrom Cole (b. 1868) and her husband, William Chester Chase (b. 1865) Boston, until at least 1911 [see note 4]. By 1927, Hannah Marcy Edwards (d. 1929), Boston [see note 5]; 1939, bequest of Hannah Marcy Edwards to the MFA. (Accession Date: October 11, 1939) NOTES: [1] He lent the painting to the exhibition "Claude Monet - A. Rodin," Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 1889, cat. no. 124. [2] Getty Provenance Index, M. Knoedler and Co. Records, PI-Record nos. K-9980 and K-5205 (stock book 4, no. 6301, pp. 116 and 133). [3] Information about Cole's purchase of the painting is taken from a letter from A. S. McKean of Doll and Richards to Charles C. Cunningham (November 1, 1939; in MFA curatorial file). Cole lent the painting to "An Exhibition of Paintings by Claude Monet," St. Botolph Club, Boston, March 28 - April 9, 1892, cat. no. 13. [4] Mrs. William Chester Chase first lent the painting to the MFA in 1894; it was also lent, under her husband's name, to the exhibition "Paintings by Claude Monet, 1876 - 1907," MFA, Boston, August 1 - October 1, 1911, cat. no. 26. [5] Hannah Edwards lent the painting anonymously to the "Memorial Exhibition of Paintings by Claude Monet, " MFA, Boston, January 11 - February 6, 1927, cat. no. 46. Siblings Robert (d. 1924), Hannah (d. 1929), and Grace (d. 1938) Edwards were each collectors of art, who seemed to have had joint ownership of the objects in their possession. When Robert died, he bequeathed his collection to the MFA in memory of their mother, Juliana Cheney Edwards. In 1925, after his death, part of his collection was acquired by the Museum, and the remainder went to his sisters, with the understanding that the objects would ultimately be left to the MFA in the collection begun in memory of their mother. The collections of Hannah and Grace were left to the MFA in 1939, following Grace's death. It is not always possible to determine exactly which paintings each sibling had owned.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    65.7 x 81.3 cm (25 7/8 x 32 in.)

    Accession Number

    39.672

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Cap d'Antibes, Mistral

    1888
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    As Monet grew older, his paintings became simpler. He began to focus on a single, isolated motif, the better to record the changes in color and light wrought on it by different times of day and fluctuations in weather. “Cap d’Antibes, Mistral” is one of three paintings of these very same trees that Monet made during his four-month sojourn in Antibes, from January through May 1888.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 88

    Provenance

    1890, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris [see note 1]. 1892, J. Eastman Chase Gallery, Boston. By 1903, acquired by Lilla Cabot Perry (b. 1848 - d. 1933) for her brother, Arthur Tracy Cabot (1852 - d. 1912), Boston [see note 2]; by inheritance to his widow, Susan Shattuck Cabot; 1942, bequest of Arthur Tracy Cabot to the MFA. (Accession Date: October 12, 1942) NOTES: [1] See Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: catalogue raisonné" (1996), vol. 3, p. 448, cat. no. 1176. [2] According to a letter from Henry L. Shattuck to W. G. Constable of the MFA (November 23, 1942; in MFA curatorial file), Lilla Cabot Perry acquired this painting for her brother. He lent it to the exhibition "A Loan Collection of Pictures by Old Masters and Other Painters," Copley Hall, Boston, 1903, cat. no. A12.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Arthur Tracy Cabot

    Details

    Dimensions

    66.0 x 81.3 cm (26 x 32 in.)

    Accession Number

    42.542

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Valley of the Creuse (Gray Day)

    1889
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    One of the first Monets to join the MFA collection, this view into the valley of the River Creuse in France’s Massif Central region demonstrates the artist’s revolutionary use of color—deep purples, reds, and blues—to evoke three-dimensional shape and shadow. Monet’s fascination with instantaneity and the changing effects of light and weather led him to return again and again to paint the same location under varying conditions.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 89

    Provenance

    1891, from the artist to Durand-Ruel, New York, NY and Paris, France; 1891, Denman Waldo Ross, Cambridge, MA, from Durand-Ruel; 1906, gift of Ross. (Accession Date: March 8, 1906)

    Credit Line

    Denman Waldo Ross Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    65.5 x 81.2 cm (25 13/16 x 31 15/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    06.115

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Valley of the Petite Creuse

    1889
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    The striking effects of Monet’s several paintings of the Creuse Valley in central France are achieved through complex, superimposed layers of color, as he combined bold brushstrokes with intricate passages made up of many small touches. Delayed by bad weather while painting his Creuse scenes, Monet hired workmen to strip the newly budded leaves from a tree in the valley so that he would not have to change his composition.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 89

    Provenance

    October 31, 1890, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 711) [see note 1]; from Durand-Ruel, Paris to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 776); April 9, 1891, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York to J. Eastman Chase Gallery, Boston, for Clara Bertram Kimball, Boston; by inheritance to her husband, David P. Kimball (d. 1923); 1923, bequest of David P. Kimball to the MFA [see note 2]. (Accession Date: November 1, 1923) NOTES: [1] The provenance given here (through 1891) is taken from a letter from Durand-Ruel, Paris to the MFA (April 18, 1962; in MFA curatorial file). [2] In 1923 David P. Kimball bequeathed forty paintings to the MFA in memory of his wife, Clara Bertram Kimball. He noted in his will that these were "from the collection made by her and bequeathed to me."

    Credit Line

    Bequest of David P. Kimball in memory of his wife Clara Bertram Kimball

    Details

    Dimensions

    65.4 x 81.3 cm (25 3/4 x 32 in.)

    Accession Number

    23.541

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Valley of the Creuse (Sunlight Effect)

    1889
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    This picture belongs to a group that Monet painted during his 1889 stay at Fresselines in the Massif Central region of France. It represents the convergence of two rivers, the Petite Creuse and the Grande Creuse, under the midday sun. Bright light casts every cranny and outcropping of rock into high relief and makes the river below sparkle with Monet’s impasted strokes of white.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 89

    Provenance

    June 20, 1889, sold by the artist to Boussod, Valadon et Cie., Paris; February 16, 1891, sold by Boussod, Valadon et Cie. to Williams and Everett, New York [see note 1]. By 1905, James F. Sutton (b. 1849 - d. 1915), New York [see note 2]; 1915, by inheritance to his widow, Florence May Sutton (b. about 1853), New York; January 17, 1917, Sutton sale, American Art Association, New York, lot 153, to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 4066); February 2, 1924, sold by Durand-Ruel to Grace M. Edwards (d. 1938), Boston; 1924, her brother, Robert Jacob Edwards (d. 1924), Boston; 1925, bequest of Robert J. Edwards to the MFA. [see note 3]. (Accession Date: April 2, 1925) NOTES: [1] As "Les eaux semblantes (Creuse)". Getty Provenance Index, Goupil et Cie. Records, PI-number G-29409, stock book 12, no. 19919, p. 111. Also see Daniel Wildenstein, Monet: Catalogue Raisonné (1996), vol. 3, p. 465, no. 1219. [2] Lent to the "Loan Collection of Paintings by Claude Monet," Copley Society of Boston, March, 1905, cat. no. 28. [3] Grace M. Edwards probably purchased the painting for her brother, Robert. Siblings Robert (d. 1924), Hannah (d. 1929), and Grace (d. 1938) Edwards were each collectors of art, who seemed to have had joint ownership of the objects in their possession. When Robert died, he bequeathed his collection to the MFA in memory of their mother, Juliana Cheney Edwards. In 1925, after his death, part of his collection was acquired by the Museum, and the remainder went to his sisters, with the understanding that the objects would ultimately be left to the MFA in the collection begun in memory of their mother. The collections of Hannah and Grace were left to the MFA in 1939, following Grace's death. It is not always possible to determine exactly which paintings each sibling had owned.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    65.1 x 92.4 cm (25 5/8 x 36 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    25.107

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Grainstack (Sunset)

    1891
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    In 1890 and 1891, Monet painted a group of pictures of the stacks of wheat (referred to as grainstacks or haystacks) in the fields near his home, exhibiting them as a series to great critical acclaim in 1891. Traditionally, the motifs in Monet’s series paintings have been seen merely as vehicles through which he could explore the interaction of light, color, and form over the course of the day and in different weather conditions. But scholars have recently proposed that Monet was equally interested in the meaning and significance of the motifs themselves. Grainstacks, for example, are traditional symbols of the land’s fertility, the local farmers’ material wealth, and the region’s prosperity.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 91

    Provenance

    September 1891, possibly sold by the artist to Hamman for M. Knoedler and Co., New York [see note 1]. By 1905, James F. Sutton (b. 1849 - d. 1915), New York [see note 2]; 1915, by inheritance to his widow, Florence May Sutton (b. about 1853), New York; January 17, 1917, Sutton sale, American Art Association, New York, lot 156, to Durand-Ruel, New York and Paris; 1917, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York to Robert J. Edwards (d. 1924), Boston; 1925, bequest of Robert J. Edwards to the MFA. [see note 3]. (Accession Date: April 2, 1925) NOTES: [1] Daniel Wildenstein, Monet: Catalogue Raisonné (1996), vol. 3, p. 502, cat. no. 1289. [2] Lent to the "Loan Collection of Paintings by Claude Monet," Copley Society of Boston, March, 1905, cat. no. 66. [3] Siblings Robert (d. 1924), Hannah (d. 1929), and Grace (d. 1938) Edwards were each collectors of art, who seemed to have had joint ownership of the objects in their possession. When Robert died, he bequeathed his collection to the MFA in memory of their mother, Juliana Cheney Edwards. In 1925, after his death, part of his collection was acquired by the Museum, and the remainder went to his sisters, with the understanding that the objects would ultimately be left to the MFA in the collection begun in memory of their mother. The collections of Hannah and Grace were left to the MFA in 1939, following Grace's death. It is not always possible to determine exactly which paintings each sibling had owned.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.3 x 92.7 cm (28 7/8 x 36 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    25.112

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Grainstack (Snow Effect)

    1891
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    In 1890 and 1891, Monet painted a group of pictures of the stacks of wheat (referred to as grainstacks or haystacks) in the fields near his home, exhibiting them as a series to great critical acclaim in 1891. Traditionally, the motifs in Monet’s series paintings have been seen merely as vehicles through which he could explore the interaction of light, color, and form over the course of the day and in different weather conditions. But scholars have recently proposed that Monet was equally interested in the meaning and significance of the motifs themselves. Grainstacks, for example, are traditional symbols of the land’s fertility, the local farmers’ material wealth, and the region’s prosperity.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 91

    Provenance

    May 9, 1891, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris; June 30, 1891, sold by Durand-Ruel to Horatio Appleton Lamb (b. 1850 - d. 1926), Boston [see note 1]; by descent to his daughters, Aimée Lamb (b. 1893 - d. 1989) and Rosamond Lamb (b. 1898 - d. 1989), Boston; 1970, gift of Misses Aimée and Rosamond Lamb to the MFA. (Accession Date: March 11, 1970) NOTES: [1] According to a letter from Durand-Ruel, Paris to Lucretia H. Giese of the MFA (May 14, 1968).

    Credit Line

    Gift of Miss Aimée and Miss Rosamond Lamb in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Horatio Appleton Lamb

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Wildenstein cat. no. 1280

    Dimensions

    65.4 x 92.4 cm (25 3/4 x 36 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1970.253

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Rouen Cathedral Façade and Tour d'Albane (Morning Effect)

    1894
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Monet’s series paintings of the 1890s—multiple variations of a single motif conceived, executed, and exhibited as a group—are among his most inventive and remarkable works. In the winter of 1892 the artist spent several months studying and painting the façade of Rouen Cathedral in his native Normandy. From rooms facing the cathedral across a square, Monet concentrated on the analysis of light and its effects on the forms of the façade, changing from one canvas to another as the day progressed. Later he extensively reworked the thirty paintings of the cathedral series in his studio at Giverny. Their encrusted surfaces of dry, thickly layered paint evoke the rough texture of weathered stone, absorbing and reflecting light like the walls of the cathedral itself.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 1894

    Provenance

    February 1899, possibly sold by the artist to Isidore Montaignac (b. 1851 - d. 1924), Paris [see note 1]; possibly from Montaignac to the American Art Association, New York [see note 2]; April 10, 1900, American Art Association sale, Chickering Hall, New York, lot 62, to Cottier et Cie. for $3100, for Edward Fullerton Milliken (b. 1863 - d. 1906), New York; February 14, 1902, Milliken sale, American Art Association, New York, lot 16, to M. Knoedler and Co., New York for $4000, for Berthe Honoré (Mrs. Palmer) Potter (b. 1849 - d. 1918), Chicago; by descent to her son, Honoré Palmer (b. 1874), Chicago; 1923, sold by Honoré Palmer to Howard Young Galleries, New York (stock no. 2202) [see note 3]; 1924, sold by Howard Young Galleries to the MFA for $11,000. (Accession Date: January 3, 1924) NOTES: [1] According to Daniel Wildenstein, Monet: Catalogue Raisonné (1996), vol. 3, p. 560, cat. no. 1347. [2] Montaignac was a dealer and the Paris correspondent of James Sutton, who co-founded the American Art Association. [3] According to two letters from the Howard Young Galleries to the MFA (January 18, 1924 and January 24, 1940).

    Credit Line

    Tompkins Collection—Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    106.1 x 73.9 cm (41 3/4 x 29 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    24.6

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Rouen Cathedral, Façade

    1894
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Monet’s series paintings of the 1890s—multiple variations of a single motif conceived, executed, and exhibited as a group—are among his most inventive and remarkable works. In the winter of 1892 the artist spent several months studying and painting the façade of Rouen Cathedral in his native Normandy. From rooms facing the cathedral across a square, Monet concentrated on the analysis of light and its effects on the forms of the façade, changing from one canvas to another as the day progressed. Later he extensively reworked the thirty paintings of the cathedral series in his studio at Giverny. Their encrusted surfaces of dry, thickly layered paint evoke the rough texture of weathered stone, absorbing and reflecting light like the walls of the cathedral itself.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 94

    Provenance

    1907, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris and New York (stock no. 3327); 1917, sold by Durand-Ruel to Hannah Marcy Edwards (d. 1929), Boston; by inheritance to Grace M. Edwards (d. 1938), Boston; 1939, bequest of Hannah Marcy Edwards to the MFA [see note 1]. (Accession Date: October 11, 1939) NOTES: [1] Siblings Robert (d. 1924), Hannah (d. 1929), and Grace (d. 1938) Edwards were each collectors of art, who seemed to have had joint ownership of the objects in their possession. When Robert died, he bequeathed his collection to the MFA in memory of their mother, Juliana Cheney Edwards. In 1925, after his death, part of his collection was acquired by the Museum, and the remainder went to his sisters, with the understanding that the objects would ultimately be left to the MFA in the collection begun in memory of their mother. The collections of Hannah and Grace were left to the MFA in 1939, following Grace's death. It is not always possible to determine exactly which paintings each sibling had owned.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    100.6 x 66.0 cm (39 5/8 x 26 in.)

    Accession Number

    39.671

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Morning on the Seine, near Giverny

    1896
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    In the summers of 1896 and 1897 Monet set up his easel at three-thirty each morning in a boat moored just off the riverbank near his house at Giverny. There he sat and painted the series of twenty-one canvases to which this one belongs. Grisaille effects of morning mist, trees half-visible in the dawn light, and glimmering reflections on the water make this series arguably the most subtle he ever painted.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 96

    Provenance

    November 28, 1898, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 3152) [see note 1]; from Durand-Ruel, Paris to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 1900); January 29, 1901, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York to Mrs. Potter Palmer, Chicago; March 3, 1902, sold by Mrs. Palmer to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 2511); March 22, 1905, sold by Durand-Ruel to Arthur B. Crosby, New York; March 22, 1906, sold by Crosby to Durand-Ruel [see note 2]. 1907, with D. H. Cochran, Jr.; February 19, 1907, sold by D.H. Cochran, Jr. to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 2789); March 21, 1907, sold by Durand-Ruel to Grace M. Edwards (d. 1938), Boston; 1939, bequest of Grace M. Edwards to the MFA [see note 3]. (Accession Date: October 11, 1939) NOTES: [1] See letter from Durand-Ruel, Paris to the MFA in curatorial file. [2] Notes in the MFA curatorial file indicate that he sold the picture on this date, probably to Durand-Ruel, New York. [3] Siblings Robert (d. 1924), Hannah (d. 1929), and Grace (d. 1938) Edwards were each collectors of art, who seemed to have had joint ownership of the objects in their possession. When Robert died, he bequeathed his collection to the MFA in memory of their mother, Juliana Cheney Edwards. In 1925, after his death, part of his collection was acquired by the Museum, and the remainder went to his sisters, with the understanding that the objects would ultimately be left to the MFA in the collection begun in memory of their mother. The collections of Hannah and Grace were left to the MFA in 1939, following Grace's death. It is not always possible to determine exactly which paintings each sibling had owned.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.7 x 93 cm (29 x 36 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    39.655

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Morning on the Seine, near Giverny

    1897
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Monet traveled as far north as Norway and as far south as Venice to look for different motifs, but he always returned to the places he knew best. He painted the river Seine in Paris, Argenteuil, Vétheuil, and where it emptied into the English Channel. He turned to it again in 1896 and 1897 for his series of canvases showing how it looked at dawn. This version is notable for its softness. Its colors of pinkish mauve, cool blues, and greens are matched with large, simple, and rounded shapes. With the point of view suspended over the water, we are made to feel weightless, perhaps even bodiless. Almost symmetrical reflections threaten to disorient us, but Monet has left enough clues to let us know which way is up.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 97

    Provenance

    June 18, 1909, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 9102) [see note 1]; 1909, from Durand-Ruel, Paris to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 3328); October 22, 1909, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York to James Viles, Chicago; March 1, 1911, sold by Viles to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 3418); March 7, 1911, sold by Durand-Ruel to Mrs. Walter Scott Fitz (Henrietta Goddard Wigglesworth) (b. 1847 - d. 1927), Boston; 1911, gift of Mrs. Walter Scott Fitz to the MFA. (Accession Date: April 6, 1911) NOTES: [1] The provenance information was provided in a letter from Durand-Ruel et Cie., Paris, to the MFA (April 18, 1962; in MFA curatorial file).

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. W. Scott Fitz

    Details

    Dimensions

    81.3 x 92.7 cm (32 x 36 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    11.1261

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • The Water Lily Pond

    1900
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    In 1883, Monet settled in the village of Giverny, about forty miles from Paris, and purchased a house there in 1890. Shortly thereafter, he acquired an additional plot of land, where he constructed a picturesque water garden. A Japanese bridge spanned the pond at its narrowest point. This is among the first of Monet’s paintings to emphasize the reflections of the bank and the sky on the flat surface of the water.

    Inscription

    Lower left: Claude Monet 1900

    Provenance

    December 1900, sold by the artist by Léonce Rosenberg (b. 1877 - d. 1947), Paris [see note 1]. 1923, Léon Orosdi, Paris [see note 2]; May 25, 1923, posthumous Orosdi sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 41, to Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 12162); November 27, 1926, sold by Durand-Ruel to Alvan Tufts Fuller (b. 1878 - d. 1958), Boston [see note 3]; 1959, the Alvan T. Fuller Foundation, Inc., Boston; 1961, gift of the Alvan T. Fuller Foundation to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 20, 1961) NOTES: [1] See Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: Catalogue Raisonné," vol. 4 (1996), p. 731, cat. no. 1630. [2] According to a letter from Durand-Ruel, Paris, to the MFA (1962; in MFA curatorial file), Orosdi purchased almost all of his paintings from Bernheim-Jeune, Paris, although it cannot be confirmed that he acquired this painting from that gallery. [3] Information about Durand-Ruel's transactions is taken from a letter from Durand-Ruel to the MFA (as above, n. 2). Durand-Ruel states that this painting was sold to Mr. Fuller on November 27, 1927; however, he first lent it to the MFA on January 7 of that year. It is possible that the year of the sale was written incorrectly in the letter.

    Credit Line

    Given in memory of Governor Alvan T. Fuller by the Fuller Foundation

    Details

    Dimensions

    90.2 x 92.7 cm (35 1/2 x 36 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    61.959

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Charing Cross Bridge (overcast day), 1900

    1900
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Coal dust combined with naturally damp weather in the 19th century to create near twilit conditions in London, even at midday. Seated on the balcony of his hotel room overlooking the Thames, Monet produced thirty-five views of Charing Cross Bridge in September of 1899, using the city’s polluted atmosphere to poetic ends. Glittering reflections of yellow sunlight dapple the water through a violet fog, dissolving the bridge and distant towers of Parliament into hazy abstraction.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet 1900

    Provenance

    October 30, 1905, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris and New York [see note 1]; January, 1907, sold by Durand-Ruel to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Derwin Hubbard, Chicago; by descent to their daughter, Janet Hubbard (Mrs. Brooks) Stevens, Concord, MA; 1978, gift of Janet Hubbard Stevens to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 15, 1978) NOTES: [1] The provenance information given here (to 1907) was provided in a letter from Michèle Paret, Les Beaux-Arts, Paris, to Lucretia Giese of the MFA (July 28, 1970; in MFA curatorial file).

    Credit Line

    Given by Janet Hubbard Stevens in memory of her mother, Janet Watson Hubbard

    Details

    Dimensions

    60.6 x 91.5 cm (23 7/8 x 36 in.)

    Accession Number

    1978.465

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Water Lilies

    1905
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Beginning in 1903, Monet embarked on a series of canvases depicting his water garden at Giverny. Here, the pads of lilies scattered across the painting suggest the water’s surface, receding into space. The pattern of light and dark beneath the lilies indicates the reflection on the water-sky and the trees on a distant bank. Monet exhibited forty-eight of these “landscapes of water” in 1909. Fascinated by the artist’s subtle fusion of reality and reflection, critics compared the paintings to poetry and music.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet 1905

    Provenance

    June 1909, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel, Paris and New York, and Bernheim-Jeune, Paris [see note 1]; December 10, 1909, sold by Durand-Ruel to Alexander Cochrane (b. 1840 - d. 1919), Boston; December 21, 1909, sold by Alexander Cochrane to Durand-Ruel, New York; 1911, sold by Durand-Ruel to Mrs. Walter Scott Fitz (Henrietta Goddard Wigglesworth) (b. 1847 - d. 1927), Boston; by descent to her son, Edward Jackson Holmes (b. 1873 - d. 1950), Boston; 1939, gift of Edward Jackson Holmes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 14, 1939) NOTES: [1] The provenance information given here (through 1911) is taken from Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: catalogue raisonné" (1996), vol. 4, p. 759, cat. no. 1671.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Edward Jackson Holmes

    Details

    Dimensions

    89.5 x 100.3 cm (35 1/4 x 39 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    39.804

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Water Lilies

    1907
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Beginning in 1903, Monet embarked on a series of paintings depicting his water garden at Giverny, its lily pads and endless play of reflections. Inspired by Japanese prints, he hoped to evoke “presence through shadow and the whole through the part”—suggesting the surrounding banks, trees, and sky, though never representing them directly. In 1909 Monet exhibited forty-eight of these “water landscapes” at his dealer’s gallery in Paris, among them this canvas.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet 1907

    Provenance

    June 1909, sold by the artist to Bernheim-Jeune and Durand-Ruel, Paris and New York; December 1909, sold by Durand-Ruel to Alexander Cochrane (b. 1840 - d. 1919), Boston; 1919, bequest of Alexander Cochrane to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 3, 1919)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Alexander Cochrane

    Details

    Dimensions

    96.8 x 98.4 cm (38 1/8 x 38 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.170

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Lorna and Robert Rosenberg Gallery (Gallery 252)

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  • Grand Canal, Venice

    1908
    Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926)

    Description

    Venice, Monet had always told his wife, was “too beautiful to paint.” But when he accepted the invitation of an American friend to stay at her rented palazzo on the Grand Canal in 1908, he set to work, turning out thirty-seven canvases over the course of his visit. This view, taken from the boat landing of the Palazzo Barbaro, captures the baroque church of Santa Maria della Salute and its reflection dancing on the water. Unlike many Venetian view painters, Monet showed less interest in representing famous monuments than in capturing the play of light and reflection on the city’s waterways.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Claude Monet 1908

    Provenance

    March 1912, sold by the artist to Bernheim-Jeune, Paris and Durand-Ruel, Paris (stock no. 9992) [see note 1]; from Durand-Ruel, Paris to Durand-Ruel, New York (stock no. 3543); November 1912, sold by Durand-Ruel, New York to Alexander Cochrane (b. 1840 - d. 1919), Boston; 1919, bequest of Alexander Cochrane to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 3, 1919) NOTES: [1] The provenance given here is taken from Daniel Wildenstein, "Monet: catalogue raisonné" (1996), vol. 4, p. 809, cat. no. 1738. The painting was included in the exhibition "Monet - Venise," Galerie Bernheim-Jeune, Paris, May 28 - June 8, 1912, cat. no. 3.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Alexander Cochrane

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.7 x 92.4 cm (29 x 36 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.171

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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