• Explore a selection of sculptures from the early Medieval to twentieth-century, including works by Renaissance, Medieval, and modern masters such as Donatello, Jean-Antoine Houdon, Edgar Degas, Auguste Rodin, and Henry Moore.

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  • God the father on the Globe supported by the Four Evangelists

    Italian (Venice)
    After 1593
    Girolamo Campagna (1552–1623)

    Object Place: Venice, Italy

    Description

    Model for centerpiece of High Altar in Church of San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice; 4 kneeling Evangelists (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John with symbols) support copper globe on shoulders atop which God stands, right hand extended in blessing. All on “belle joyeuse” marble base.

    This group was probably cast after the terracotta modello for the figures on the centerpiece of the high altar in San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice, which was executed between 1591 and 1593 and signed by Campagna. The celestial globe carried by the Evangelists is a Christian reinterpretation of the pagan image of Atlas or Hercules carrying the globe. The design for the composition was executed by Campagna’s friend, the painter Antonio Vassilacchi (1556-1629)

    Provenance

    By 1967, Luigi Galli (dealer), Carate Brianza, Italy; 1968, sold by Galli to Ildebrando Bossi, P. Bossi et fils, Nice, France; 1968, sold by Bossi to John Goelet; gift of John Goelet to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 11, 1968)

    Credit Line

    Centennial Gift of John Goelet

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 123.2cm (48 1/2in.) Other (Overall; Statuette, God the Father): 50.2cm (19 3/4in.) Other (Overall; Statuette, St. Matthew): 42.5cm (16 3/4in.) Other (Overall; Statuette, St. Mark): 47.3cm (18 5/8in.) Other (Overall; Statuette, St. Luke): 46.3cm (18 1/4in.) Other (Overall; Statuette,St. John): 43.2cm (17in.) Other (globe): 41.8 cm (16 7/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    68.583a-f

    Medium or Technique

    Cast bronze and beaten copper

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Head of Medusa

    Swiss
    about 1894
    Arnold Böcklin (Swiss, 1827–1901)

    Object Place: Europe, Switzerland

    Description

    Papier mache (?) and plaster. Open mouthed head with coppery locks and snakes issuing from domed black medallion with molded and gilt rim (worn and broken showing plaster at top.)


    Medusa was a mythological, snake-haired creature whose gaze could turn men to stone. The Greek hero Perseus avoided this fate by holding up his highly polished shield to capture Medusa’s reflection. Protected in this way, he beheaded her. The image of the head of Medusa was believed to ward off evil, and it was often used to decorate shields and breastplates. This rare example of a sculpture by the painter Böcklin presents a terrifying vision of Medusa with staring eyes, open mouth, and a wreath of snakes around her head.

    Provenance

    Possibly from the artist to August Rubel, Zurich [see note 1]; by descent to his son Dr. Edward Rubel, Zurich; by 1954, by descent to his nephew Charles Adrian Rubel, Brookline, MA; 1978, bequest of Charles Adrian Rubel to the MFA. (Accession date: December 13, 1978) NOTES: [1] See excerpt of 1954 letter from Dr. Edward Rubel, which mentions meeting Böcklin in 1893 and the later delivery of the sculpture to the Rubel house, and 1955 letter from Charles Adrian Rubel, in which he states that the sculpture once belonged to his grandfather, both in curatorial file.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of the Estate of Mr. C. Adrian Rübel

    Details

    Dimensions

    Other (Overall): 61cm (24in.)

    Accession Number

    1978.514

    Medium or Technique

    Plaster and Papier mache (?), polychrome

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Bust of Beatrice

    Italian
    1819–22
    Antonio Canova (Italian, 1757–1822)

    Description

    Marble bust by Antonio Canova


    Canova is generally considered the greatest neoclassical sculptor, and he was the most famous artist of his day. This bust began as a portrait of renowned beauty Juliette Récamier, whose celebrated image painted by Jacques-Louis David (1800) hangs in the Louvre Museum. Canova’s original plaster bust did not please Récamier, and he abandoned the idea of carving a marble version. Instead, he idealized his sitter’s features, transforming the bust into an “ideal head” of Beatrice, muse of the poet Dante. The ideal head was a type of marble bust created by Canova to present images of perfect beauty.

    Provenance

    1930s, Bensi family, Genoa; by 1954, sold by Bensi to a private collection, Italy; until 2002, by descent within the family, to a private collector [see note 1]; 2002, sold by the private collector, through Peter Laverack, New York, to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 25, 2002) NOTES: [1] The provenance was provided by Peter Laverack at the time of its acquisition.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund, Edward J. and Mary S. Holmes Fund, John Lowell Gardner Fund, Russell B. and Andrée Beauchamp Stearns Fund, Helen B. Sweeney Fund, Frank B. Bemis Fund, Seth K. Sweetser Fund, H.E. Bolles Fund, Arthur Mason Knapp Fund, and Benjamin Pierce Cheney Donation

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (excluding socle): 45.7 x 27.9 x 25.4 cm (18 x 11 x 10 in.) Overall (with socle): 58.4 x 27.9 x 25.4 cm (23 x 11 x 10 in.) Other (socle): 12.7 x 17.8 cm (5 x 7 in.)

    Accession Number

    2002.318

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    On View

    Thomas Jefferson Coolidge III Gallery (Gallery 248)

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • The Massacre of the Innocents

    Italian
    about 1710
    Giuseppe Piamontini (Italian (Florence), 1663–1744)

    Object Place: Italy

    Description

    Cast in high relief against an architectural background of columns and arches. Soldiers slaughtering and carrying off young children while agitated mothers attempt to save them. Figures extend into space around edges.


    These two masterpieces of bronze casting present scenes of cataclysmic violence. The Fall of the Giants shows figures crushed by boulders in a torrent of stone and flesh, while the Massacre of the Innocents stresses the brutality of the soldiers, the pliability of the babies’ bodies, and the wrenching terror and grief of the mothers. The sculptures seem to have been intended as a pair, and perhaps share the theme of the violence involved in momentous shifts from one religion to another; the Fall of the Giants marks the rise of the Olympian gods in Greek mythology, and the Massacre of the Innocents the beginning of the Christian era.

    Provenance

    1724, exhibited at the church of SS. Annunziata, Florence [see note 1]. Sir Naylor-Leyland, Nantclwyd Hall, Ruthin, North Wales. By 1965, Mr. and Mrs. George Farrow, England [see note 2]; November 28, 1968, Farrow sale, Sotheby's, London, lot 36, to Heim Gallery, London; February 20, 1969, sold by Heim Gallery to Angus W. T. Hood, England; 1974, sold by Angus Hood to Heim Gallery; 1974, sold by Heim Gallery to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 11, 1974) NOTES: [1] This relief can be identified with the plaque exhibited by the artist at SS. Annunziata during the Festival of St. Luke in 1724, described in the catalogue as "Un Basso Relievo di Bronzo che rappresenta la Strage degl'Innocenti di mano del Sig. Giuseppe Piamontini" (A bronze bas-relief that represents the Massacre of the Innocents, by the hand of Mr. Giuseppe Piamontini). It was exhibited with its pendant, a bronze relief representing the Fall of the Giants (MFA no. 1974.607). See "Works of Art and a Collection of Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes," Sotheby's, London, November 28, 1968, lots 36-37. [2] Hugh Honour, "Florentine Baroque bronzes in an English private collection," Connoisseur 159, no. 640 (June, 1965), pp. 86, 89.

    Credit Line

    John H. and Ernestine A. Payne Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 66.7 x 83.8 cm (26 1/4 x 33 in.) Mount (Aluminum wall cleat / space bar): 15.2 x 92.1 cm (6 x 36 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1974.606

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze

    On View

    Angelica Lloyd Russell Gallery (Gallery 142)

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    Europe

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  • Head of a Prophet

    French (Strasbourg)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1300
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Strasbourg, France

    Description

    This deeply expressive head may come from the majestic Gothic cathedral in Strasbourg. Like many other churches, this cathedral was vandalized during the French Revolution, and sculptures were removed, destroyed, or decapitated. The pointed cap and the slightly open mouth indicate that the head represents a prophet, speaking his message. The face is sensitively carved, with furrowed brow, sunken cheeks, and pensive eyes conveying a strong personality.

    Provenance

    Probably the head of a prophet on the façade of the Strasbourg Cathedral, France [see note 1]. Robert Forrer (b. 1866 - d. 1947), Strasbourg [see note 2]. May 8, 1944, sold by Gabriel Dereppe (dealer), New York, to Joseph Brummer (b. 1883 - d. 1947) for the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N5949) [see note 3]; after Joseph Brummer's death, passed to his brother, Ernest Brummer, New York; 1956, sold by Ernest Brummer to the MFA for $2,000. (Accession Date: October 11, 1956) NOTES: [1] According to the Brummer Gallery stock card (N5949) and Dorothy Gillerman, Gothic Sculpture in America (New York: Garland, 1989), vol. 1, pp. 19-21, cat. no. 9. Gillerman also discusses the damage done to Strasbourg cathedral in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when figures were removed. [2] According to Gillerman 1989 (as above, n. 1). [3] Dereppe was a dealer who worked for Demotte, Inc., in Paris and New York.

    Credit Line

    William E. Nickerson Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    36.5 x 23.5 x 25.4 cm (14 3/8 x 9 1/4 x 10 in.)

    Accession Number

    56.506

    Medium or Technique

    Sandstone

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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    Europe

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  • Annunciation group

    Southern Netherlandish
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1440–50
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Flanders

    Description

    This piece served a private, devotional purpose and was possibly part of a home altar or shrine. Alabaster is a soft stone, facilitating the carving of minute details. Here, the inclusion of a tower-like structure furnished with books adds a charming intimacy to the scene.

    Provenance

    1950, consigned by A. M. Adler, New York, to Raphael Stora, New York; 1950, sold by Stora to the MFA for $400. (Accession Date: October 10, 1950)

    Credit Line

    H. E. Bolles Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    20.32 x 19.7 x 7.6 cm (8 x 7 3/4 x 3 in.)

    Accession Number

    50.3229

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polylchromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • The Virgin and Child

    Southern Switzerland (?)
    late 17th century
    Circle Of Christoph Daniel Schenck (Swiss)

    Object Place: Switzerland

    Description

    Provenance

    [See note 1] By 1961, Arthur Einstein, London. January 29, 1999, sold at Sotheby's, New York, lot 271. By 2000, with Blumka Gallery, New York [see note 2]; 2003, sold by Blumka Gallery to the MFA. (Accession date: March 26, 2003) NOTES: [1] The history of ownership listed here pertains to MFA objects 2003.73 and 2003.74, a pair of ivories. [2] See "Collecting Treasures of the Past," Exhibition Catalogue, Blumka Gallery, New York, January 26-February 11, 2000, Cat. No. 41.

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated in memory of James Eric and Frances Anne Rogers

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 13.7 cm (5 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    2003.74

    Medium or Technique

    Ivory

    On View

    Alyce Morrissey Gallery (Kunstkammer) (Gallery 143)

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    Europe

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  • Head of a Saint or Prophet

    Italian (Florence)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1320–25
    Attributed to Tino di Camaino (Italian, about 1280–1337)

    Description

    This head has recently been attributed to Tino di Camaino, a sculptor who worked in Siena, Florence, and Naples. It may be a fragment of a monumental sculpture that was once placed over a door to the baptistery in Florence. Although the nose is broken off, the fine working of the face and the deep drilling of the beard emphatically capture the character and expression of the figure, which would have been clearly legible to onlookers on the street below.

    Provenance

    By 1938, Edouard Larcade, St. Germain-en-Laye, France [see note 1]; July 23, 1938, sold by Larcade to Joseph Brummer (b. 1883 - d. 1947), New York (stock no. P15031); 1947, sold by Joseph Brummer to the MFA for $7800. (Accession Date: November 13, 1947) NOTES: [1] Speculations that this piece originally came either from Pisa (as noted on the reverse of an MFA photograph in the MFA curatorial file) or from the Florentine Baptistery (as suggested by Hanns Swarzenski) remain undocumented. See Anita Fiderer Moskowitz's comments in Dorothy Gillerman, ed., "Gothic Sculpture in America," vol. 1, "The New England Museums" (New York and London: Garland, 1989), p. 99, cat. no. 71.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    33.0 x 24.1 x 27.9 cm (13 x 9 1/2 x 11 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1447

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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    Europe

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  • Saint John the Evangelist

    Southern Netherlandish (Tournai?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1440–50
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    This sculpture of Saint John, identified by the chalice he holds, was part of a larger ensemble of the four evangelists or the twelve apostles, possibly set into a small altarpiece. The exquisite carving of the hair, face, and drapery is enhanced by a delicate application of paint, creating an engaging naturalism.

    Provenance

    1950, consigned by A. M. Adler, New York, to Raphael Stora, New York; 1950, sold by Stora to the MFA for $420. (Accession Date: October 10, 1950)

    Credit Line

    H. E. Bolles Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    32.1 x 9.5 x 7.9 cm (12 5/8 x 3 3/4 x 3 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    50.3228

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • The Fall of the Giants

    Italian
    about 1710
    Giuseppe Piamontini (Italian (Florence), 1663–1744)

    Object Place: Italy

    Description

    Cast in high relief with the Giants being crushed beneath falling rocks while Zeus with his thunderbolt in his right hand and the eagle watch from the sky above. A fortified town and palms in the background. Figures extend into space around edges.


    These two masterpieces of bronze casting present scenes of cataclysmic violence. The Fall of the Giants shows figures crushed by boulders in a torrent of stone and flesh, while the Massacre of the Innocents stresses the brutality of the soldiers, the pliability of the babies’ bodies, and the wrenching terror and grief of the mothers. The sculptures seem to have been intended as a pair, and perhaps share the theme of the violence involved in momentous shifts from one religion to another; the Fall of the Giants marks the rise of the Olympian gods in Greek mythology, and the Massacre of the Innocents the beginning of the Christian era.

    Provenance

    1724, exhibited at the church of SS. Annunziata, Florence [see note 1]. Sir Naylor-Leyland, Nantclwyd Hall, Ruthin, North Wales. By 1965, Mr. and Mrs. George Farrow, England [see note 2]; November 28, 1968, Farrow sale, Sotheby's, London, lot 36, to Heim Gallery, London; February 20, 1969, sold by Heim Gallery to Angus W. T. Hood, England; 1974, sold by Angus Hood to Heim Gallery; 1974, sold by Heim Gallery to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 11, 1974) NOTES: [1] This relief can be identified with the plaque exhibited by the artist at SS. Annunziata during the Festival of St. Luke in 1724, described in the catalogue as "Un Basso Rilievo in Bronzo della Caduta de Giganti del Sig. Giuseppe Piamontini" (A bronze bas-relief of the Fall of the Giants by Mr. Giuseppe Piamontini). It was exhibited with its pendant, a bronze relief representing the Massacre of the Innocents (MFA no. 1974.606). See "Works of Art and a Collection of Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes," Sotheby's, London, November 28, 1968, lots 36-37. [2] Hugh Honour, "Florentine Baroque bronzes in an English private collection," Connoisseur 159, no. 640 (June, 1965), pp. 86, 89.

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated by John Goelet and by subscription

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 61 x 80 cm (24 x 31 1/2 in.) Mount (Aluminum wall cleat and space bar): 15.2 x 94.6 cm (6 x 37 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1974.607

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze

    On View

    Angelica Lloyd Russell Gallery (Gallery 142)

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Virgin and child with lilies

    Italian (Florence)
    Renaissance
    about 1460–70
    Attributed to Luca della Robbia (Italian, Florence, 1399 or 1400–1482)

    Object Place: Italy

    Description

    Blue, white and green with gold halos. Terracotta.


    Luca della Robbia was famous for the invention and perfection of glazed terra cotta sculpture. This technique allowed the sculptor to model in the inexpensive medium of clay. Firing in a kiln imparted durability to the clay and additional firing with pigmented tin glazes achieved a lasting brilliance and purity of color. The della Robbia family workshop produced many reliefs representing the Virgin and Child: this one shows Mary as the Madonna of Humility, with the Christ Child reaching out for lilies, a symbol of the Virgin’s purity.

    Provenance

    Quincy Adams Shaw (b. 1825 - d. 1908), Boston [see note 1]; 1917, gift of Quincy Adams Shaw, through Quincy Adams Shaw, Jr., and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton, to the MFA. (Accession Date: March 29, 1917)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Quincy Adams Shaw through Quincy Adams Shaw, Jr., and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 48 x 38cm (18 7/8 x 14 15/16in.)

    Accession Number

    17.1476

    Medium or Technique

    Glazed terracotta

    On View

    Lois B. and Michael K. Torf Gallery (Gallery 184)

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    Europe

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  • Virgin and Child

    Southern Netherlandish (Meuse)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    first quarter of 16th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Provenance

    1917, gift of J. Templeman Coolidge. (Accession Date: February 15, 1917)

    Credit Line

    Gift of John Templeman Coolidge, Jr.

    Details

    Dimensions

    54.3 x 17.9 x 14.9 cm (21 3/8 x 7 1/16 x 5 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.328

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Saint Catherine

    Southern Netherlandish (Malines)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    About 1520–30
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Belgium

    Description

    Provenance

    1917, gift of J. Templeman Coolidge. (Accession Date: February 15, 1917)

    Credit Line

    Gift of John Templeman Coolidge, Jr.

    Details

    Dimensions

    38.7 x 14.0 x 7.0 cm (15 1/4 x 5 1/2 x 2 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.329

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Saint Catherine of Alexandria

    French (Languedoc)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1490
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1914, J. Templeman Coolidge [see note 1]; 1917, gift of J. Templeman Coolidge. (Accession Date: February 15, 1917) NOTES: [1] In 1914, this sculpture was loaned by Coolidge to the MFA until it was made a gift.

    Credit Line

    Gift of John Templeman Coolidge

    Details

    Dimensions

    97.8 x 34.0 x 25.1 cm (38 1/2 x 13 3/8 x 9 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.348

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Annunciation

    German (Upper Rhine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1440

    Object Place: Europe, Germany, Upper Rhine

    Description

    Provenance

    Church of Maria Hof, Neidingen (present-day Neudingen), Germany [see note 1]. By 1923, Hugo Benario, Berlin [see note 2]. 1926 (?), art market, Lübeck, Germany [see note 3]. 1926, Béla Hein (b. 1883 - d. 1931), Paris; July 31, 1928, sold by Hein to Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P5010); May 7, 1929, sold by Brummer to H. M. Tovell; December 23, 1929, returned by Tovell to Brummer for credit; February 14, 1930, sold by Brummer to Kleinberger Galleries; May 6, 1931, returned by Kleinberger to Brummer for credit; 1943, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $1,200. (Accession Date: January 14, 1943) NOTES: [1] Georg Swarzenski, "A Gothic Alabaster Annunciation," MFA Bulletin, 41 (June 1943), p. 12. This information is also found in notes in the curatorial file. [2] W. F. Volbach, Die Mittelalterlichen Bildwerke der Sammlung Benario (Berlin, 1923), p. 10, cat. no. 12, pl. XIV. [3] The information about the Lübeck art market and Béla Hein is taken from annotations on the reverse of photographs of the object (in MFA curatorial file).

    Credit Line

    Helen and Alice Colburn Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 31.8 x 21.0 x 6.4 cm (12 1/2 x 8 1/4 x 2 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    43.3

    Medium or Technique

    Alabaster with touches of polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Head of a Woman (Mlle Salle)

    French
    modeled in 1892, cast in bronze after 1919
    Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    This portrait represents Mathilde Salle, a well-known performer in the Paris Opera ballet, who posed for Degas in 1892. Degas produced many small sculptures in wax for his own use, including dancers, bathers and horses as well as some portrait heads like this one. After his death, the best preserved of these waxes were repaired and cast in bronze; from the bronzes a limited number of casts were made. Degas himself was reluctant to cast his works in bronze, a medium he described as “for eternity.”

    Provenance

    After 1919, cast by A. A. Hébrard and consigned to Walther Halvorsen (b. 1887 - d. 1972), Paris and London [see note 1]. 1922, Durand-Ruel, New York. 1925, Ferargil Galleries, New York. By 1962, Margarett Sargent McKean (b. 1892 - d. 1978), Boston; 1979, bequest of Margarett Sargent McKean to the MFA. (Accession Date: October 17, 1979) NOTES: [1] Information about the provenance (before 1962) is taken from Sara Campbell, "A catalogue of Degas' bronzes," Apollo 142, no. 402 (August, 1995): 24, no. 27B.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Margarett Sargent McKean

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (without base): 25.5 x 15.3 x 19.2 cm (10 1/16 x 6 x 7 9/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    1979.509

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Small Victorious Venus

    French
    1913
    Pierre-Auguste Renoir (French, 1841–1919)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Bronze. One of an edition of six cast by Valsuani for the Renoir-Vollard heirs. Standing nude figure holding drapery, on square base signed Renoir at back. On square base, columns at corners, garland, relief at front: Judgement of Paris, ram’s heads on three faces.


    With her full figure and soft face, Renoir’s Venus represents the artist’s ideal female type. In her right hand, the goddess of love and beauty holds an apple, a reference to her victory at the Judgment of Paris—the beauty contest among three goddesses that helped set the Trojan War in motion. A relief on the base of the sculpture depicts the event. Late in his life, Renoir was almost completely crippled with arthritis. With the assistance of another artist, Richard Guino, he fulfilled a long-standing desire to produce sculpture. Guino acted as Renoir’s hands, following the direct instructions of the master as he modeled clay or wax. A larger version of Victorious Venus was the only sculpture that Renoir worked on himself, modeling the head.

    Signed

    on back of base: Renoir

    Provenance

    1913, commissioned by Ambroise Vollard (b. 1867 - d. 1939), Paris [see note 1]. 1956, Fine Arts Associates, New York; 1956, sold by Fine Arts Associates to the MFA for $4,000. (Accession Date: April 12, 1956) NOTES: [1] Renoir's assistant, Richard Guino, assisted him in creating a small-scale wax statuette of the sculpture in 1913. This is one of six bronze casts of the model that were made.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 85.1 x 22.9 x 22.9 cm, 29.2 kg (33 1/2 x 9 x 9 in., 64.4 lb.)

    Accession Number

    56.259

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Bust of Madame Sedaine

    French
    1781
    Augustin Pajou (French, 1730–1809)

    Description

    Terracotta bust of Mme. Sedaine wearing wig, with curls falling over shoulders, dress draped over breast; facing left. Posthumous cast? Signed and dated Pajou 1781.


    Pajou, one of the most important French sculptors of the second half of the eighteenth century, executed this portrait when Madame Sedaine was forty-two years old. The wife of the poet Michel-Jean Sediane, she is sympathetically portrayed as an intelligent and witty woman of the Enlightenment. The sculptor lavished a great deal of attention on the elaborate form and texture of the sitter’s hair and on the soft drapery of her dress - both of which reflect neoclassical models in fashion at the time.

    Inscription

    Paper sticker on back, stamped in blue ink: Douanes Francaises Paris/Batignolles/A.T.

    Signed

    Pajou FE 1781

    Provenance

    1781, the sitter, Madame Sedaine (Suzanne-Charlotte Sériny, b. 1739 - d. 1826), and her husband, Michel-Jean Sedaine; to their daughter, Anastase-Suzanne Sedaine; by descent within the family [see note 1]. Eugène Kraemer, Paris; April 28-29, 1913, posthumous Kraemer sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, lot 98, sold to M. Lowengard, probably Armand Lowengard for Duveen Bros., Inc., New York; sold by Duveen to a private collector, New York; January 26, 1946, anonymous ("N. Y. Private Collector") sale, Parke Bernet Galleries, New York, lot 51, to M. Jacques Helft and Co., for Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876 - d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1965) NOTES: [1] The bust was published as belonging to the marquis de Brisay in the Revue de L'Histoire de Versailles et de Seine-et-Oise, Année 1903 (Versailles, 1905), pp. 118-119, ill. Anastase-Suzanne Sedaine married Achille-Louis-Françios, later marquis de Brisay (d. 1855). See J. D. Draper, "Augustin Pajou, Royal Sculpture: 1730-1809," 1997, p. 250-253, cat. no. 102.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (height with socle): 76.8 x 52 x 23 cm (30 1/4 x 20 1/2 x 9 1/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2220

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Psyche

    French
    1899
    Auguste (René) Rodin (French, 1840–1917)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Psyche was the beloved of Cupid, mischievous son of Venus, the Roman goddess of love. Rodin alludes to an intimate moment in their complicated tale, when Psyche stole a secret glimpse of her sleeping lover. Rodin’s marbles were carved by professional artisans, but the sculptor supervised their execution and often added the finishing touches. Henry Adams (1838-1918), Boston-born historian and author of the autobiographical memoir The Education of Henry Adams, saw the sculpture in Paris in 1900 and bought it for his niece.

    Signed

    at right back edge of cape: A. Rodin

    Provenance

    1900, exhibited at the Exposition Rodin, Pavillion de l'Alma, Paris and purchased by Henry Adams (b. 1838- d. 1918), Boston and Washington, D.C., for his niece, Louisa Chapin Hooper (Mrs. Ward) Thoron (b. 1874- d. 1975), Boston [see note 1]; by inheritance from Mrs. Thoron to anonymous donors; 1975, anonymous gift to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 14, 1976) NOTES: [1] See Ruth Butler, "Rodin: The Shape of Genius" (New Haven and London, 1993), p. 402 and "Rodin en 1900: l'exposition de l'Alma" (exh. cat., Paris, Musée de Luxembourg, March 12-July 15, 2001), p. 256, cat. no. 112. From May 17, 1904 until it was made a gift in 1975, this piece was on loan to the MFA from Louisa Chapin Hooper (Thoron).

    Credit Line

    Anonymous gift in memory of Ward Thoron (1867-1938) and Louisa Chapin Hooper Thoron (1874-1975)

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.66 x 68.58 x 38.1 cm (29 x 27 x 15 in.)

    Accession Number

    1975.738

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; Marble

    On View

    Sidney and Esther Rabb Gallery (Gallery 255)

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Saint Joseph with the Christ Child

    Southern Switzerland (?)
    late 17th century
    Circle Of Christoph Daniel Schenck (Swiss)

    Object Place: Switzerland

    Description

    Provenance

    [See note 1] By 1961, Arthur Einstein, London. January 29, 1999, sold at Sotheby's, New York, lot 271. By 2000, with Blumka Gallery, New York [see note 2]; 2003, sold by Blumka Gallery to the MFA. (Accession date: March 26, 2003) NOTES: [1] The history of ownership listed here pertains to MFA objects 2003.73 and 2003.74, a pair of ivories. [2] See "Collecting Treasures of the Past," Exhibition Catalogue, Blumka Gallery, New York, January 26-February 11, 2000, Cat. No. 41.

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated in memory of James Eric and Frances Anne Rogers

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 13.2cm (5 3/16in.)

    Accession Number

    2003.73

    Medium or Technique

    Ivory

    On View

    Alyce Morrissey Gallery (Kunstkammer) (Gallery 143)

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    Europe

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  • Mary of Burgundy

    French
    about 1837–42
    Jean-Auguste Barre (French, 1811–1896)

    Description

    This bronze statuette represents the 15th-century Valois princess and wife of the Hapsburg Emperor Maximilian I of Austria. It shows Mary out hawking, but sadly represents the moment just before the accident that would lead to her death. While she is still happily lost in the world of the hunt, the rearing horse and running page who tries to control the beast indicate the tragic nature of the story to the viewer.


    Mary of Burgundy was a fifteenth-century princess and the wife of Emperor Maximilian I Hapsburg of Austria. This bronze represents the poignant moment just before Mary’s fatal riding accident, as her page tries to control the agitated horse. Mary’s costume and the trappings of the horse as well as the dramatic and challenging motif of the rearing horse evoke the setting and craftsmanship of the Renaissance.

    Provenance

    About 1992, acquired in London by Charles Janoray (dealer), New York; 2002, sold by Charles Janoray to the MFA. (Accession Date: February 27, 2002)

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated by The Swan Society

    Details

    Dimensions

    49.8 x 33.0 x 14.9 cm (19 5/8 x 13 x 5 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    2002.26

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Honoré-Gabriel Riqueti, comte de Mirabeau

    French (Paris)
    About 1791–92
    After Claude-André Deseine (French, 1740–1823), Made at Duc d'Orleans Manufactory (French (Paris), 1784–1828)

    Object Place: Europe, Paris, France

    Description

    A gifted orator, Mirabeau (1749-1791) played a pivotal role in the politics or revolutionary France and advocated the establishment of a constitutional monarchy rather than a republic. This bust is based on a plaster model commissioned by the Jacobins, his political party, after his death. Few porcelain versions were made because of the technical difficulties of firing works of this scale. This bust is remarkable for it dramatic pose and the realistic description of Mirabeau’s face, scarred by small pox.

    Inscription

    On the base is inscribed Mirabeau's reply to the royalist M. de Breze, who ordered the members of the National Assembly to disperse: "Allez dire a ceux qui vous envoyent/ que nous sommes icy par la Volonte du peuple/ Et que nous n'en Sortirons que par la force des Bayonettes [Go tell those who send you that we are here by the will of the people and that we will only leave here by the force of bayonets]".

    Signed

    Signed on the socle: "Manufacture des porcelaines des sieurs Baverstock et compagnie, rue Amelot No 9, boulevard du Temple a Paris".

    Provenance

    By 1978, with Fabius Frères Antiquaires, Paris; 1978, sold by Fabius Frères Antiquaires to the MFA. (Accession date: February 16, 1978)

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    81.9 cm (32 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1978.47a-b

    Medium or Technique

    Hard-paste biscuit porcelain; hard-paste porcelain with enamel and gilded decoration (socle)

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Porcelain

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  • Virgin and Child

    French
    Medieval (Late Gothic)
    14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1960, Horace L. Mayer (d. 1968) and Florence E. Mayer, Williamstown, MA; 1979, gift of Florence E. Mayer to the MFA. (Accession Date: October 17, 1979)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Horace L. Mayer

    Details

    Dimensions

    112.4 x 31.1 x 21.0 cm (44 1/4 x 12 1/4 x 8 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1979.501

    Medium or Technique

    Limestone (intrasparite) with polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • The Flood

    French
    1800
    Claude Michel, called Clodion (French, 1738–1814)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    This terracotta is Clodion’s small-scale sketch for a lifesize plaster–one of his most important late works–that he exhibited at the Salon of 1801, in Paris. The sculpture depicts a father carrying his son as he struggles against the waves to find a higher elevation. Clodion intentionally selected the heroic subject matter in an attempt to secure a commission from the new consular government of France, headed by Napoleon Bonaparte. Although he earned a first-class medal for his works, the commission never materialized, and the original plaster has disappeared.


    This terracotta is Clodion’s small-scale sketch for a lifesize plaster-one of his most important late works-that he exhibited at the Salon of 1801, in Paris. The sculpture depicts a father carrying his son as he struggles against the waves to find a higher elevation. Clodion intentionally selected the heroic subject matter in an attempt to secure a commission from the new consular government of France, headed by Napoléon Bonaparte. Although he earned a first-class medal for his work, the commission never materialized, and the original plaster has disappeared.

    Inscription

    Scéne du dèluge.

    Markings

    Clodion·1800

    Provenance

    1814, included in the inventory of Clodion's studio after his death [See Note 1]. June 12-13, 1911, anonymous sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 65. By 1981, Peter Cecil Wilson (b.1913-d.1984), London; June 14, 1981, Peter Wilson sale, Sotheby's, Monaco, lot 38, to Alex Wengraf, Ltd., London; sold by Alex Wengraf, to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 1, 1981). NOTE: [1] On the provenance of the sculpture, see Anne L. Poulet, “Clodion’s Sculpture of the Déluge,” Journal of the Museum of Fine Arts, 3 (1991), 51-76, here 71-72, endnote 14.

    Credit Line

    John H. and Ernestine A. Payne Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 54.5 x 27.9 x 22.9 cm (21 7/16 x 11 x 9 in.)

    Accession Number

    1981.398

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Mantelpiece

    French
    about 1928
    Jacques Lipchitz (French (born in Lithuania), 1891–1973)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    A large rectangular block of limestone forming the lintel of a mantelpiece. Carved in bas-relief with two stylized dogs barking at two stylized birds at center. See also 1986.5-6, a pair of andirons.

    Provenance

    1928, commissioned by Jacques Doucet (b.1853 – d.1929) for the Cabinet de l'Orient, in his residence in Neuilly, France; 1929, at Doucet's death, presumably by inheritance to his wife, Jeanne Roger Doucet, Neuilly. Acquired from a private collection by Brame et Lorenceau, Paris [see note 1]; 1986, sold by Brame et Lorenceau to the MFA [see note 1]. (Accession Date: January 22, 1986) Notes: [1] According to information provided by Brame et Lorenceau to the MFA (December 6, 2002).

    Credit Line

    Samuel Putnam Avery Fund, Gift of William Sturgis Bigelow, Frederick Brown Fund, Bequest of Mrs. Arthur Croft—The Gardner Brewer Collection, Otis Norcross Fund, Gift of Mrs. Winthrop Sargent, Bequest of G. B. Upton, and Theodora Wilbour Fund in Memory of Zoë Wilbour, by exchange, and Gift of Charlotte F. and Irving W. Rabb

    Copyright

    © Estate of Jacques Lipchitz, courtesy, Marlborough Gallery, New York.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 46.5 x 150.5 x 32.7 cm, 544 kg (18 5/16 x 59 1/4 x 12 7/8 in., 1199.31 lb.)

    Accession Number

    1986.4

    Medium or Technique

    Limestone

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • The Three Graces

    German (Augsburg)
    about 1624
    Georg Petel (German, about 1601–1634)

    Description

    Several of the sculptures of the German sculptor, Georg Petel, are interpretations of two-dimensional compositions by the Flemish baroque painter, Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640). This group is certainly inspired by Rubens’s Three Graces in the Vienna Academy Museum (painted in about 1620-21) which Petel saw during his visit to Antwerp in 1624. He made an ivory carving of the same group which was listed in the 1635 inventory of the Duke of Buckingham, the present location of which is unknown; it is possible that the bronze group was cast after this ivory. A later bronze cast is in the Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum in Braunschweig (Bro. 181). The figures, with their raised arms and flat palms, originally supported either a shell or a basket of flowers or fruits.


    This sculpture is based on a painting of the same subject by Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), and the figures originally supported a basket or bowl of fruit or flowers. The sculptor captured the corporeality of Rubens’s figures and played on ideas of two- and three-dimensionality by working in relief, an intermediary between painting and sculpture in the round.

    Provenance

    1878, Charles Emile Jacque (b. 1813 - d. 1894), Paris; December 13-14, 1878, Jacque sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, lot 21 [see note 1]. Paul Bournet de Verron (d. 1882), Paris [see note 2]; by inheritance to his brother-in-law, Mr. Bucquet (d. 1889); by inheritence to Antoinette and Maurice Bucquet, Paris [see note 2]. 1963, private collection, Paris [see note 3]. 1963, acquired on the Paris art market by Joseph de Chellinck d'Elseghem, Brussels; June 30, 1969, Elseghem sale, Sotheby's, London, lot 29, to David Peel and Co., London; 1969, sold by Peel to John Goelet, New York; 1976, year-end gift of John Goelet to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 12, 1977) NOTES: [1] Unless otherwise noted, the provenance is based upon Fiona Healy's catalogue entry in A House of Art: Rubens as Collector, by Kristin Lohse Belkin and Fiona Healy (Schoten, 2004), p. 257, cat. no. 62. [2] On the Bournet de Verron collection and its provenance, see Gaston Migeon, "La Collection Bucquet-Bournet de Verron," Les Arts, vol. 10, no. 117 (September 1911): 7-22. M. and Mlle. Bucquet lent the sculpture to the "Exposition d'objets d'art du Moyen Age et de la Renaissance" (Jacques Seligmann, Paris, 1913), cat. no. 99. [3] Connaissance des Arts, no. 134 (April, 1963): 47.

    Credit Line

    Gift of John Goelet in honor of Hanns Swarzenski

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 30.5 x 19.1 x 5.1 cm (12 x 7 1/2 x 2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1976.842

    Medium or Technique

    Gilded bronze

    On View

    Alyce Morrissey Gallery (Kunstkammer) (Gallery 143)

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    Europe

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  • Head of a Woman

    1909
    Pablo Picasso (Spanish (worked in France), 1881–1973)

    Place of Creation: Europe, France

    Description

    Bronze, cast by Vollard. Signature incised on neck “Picasso”. [card 2] Cubist head of a woman. Bronze, one of three or four cast by Vollard. Head and gaze slightly averted towards right. Surface broken up into sharp ridges modeling face


    This portrait of Fernande Olivier is generally considered to be the first Cubist sculpture, and is an early cast of the model. The challenge of applying the ideas of Cubism to a three-dimensional object meant that the Head of a Woman is less abstracted than works on paper or canvas. The tension created between the Cubist faceting of planes and the natural form of the head makes this one of Picasso’s most moving portraits. The head tilts downward, the eyes are deeply shadowed, and the lips tightly pursed, conveying a sense of melancholy and pensiveness.

    Signed

    Incised on left side of neck, "Picasso".

    Provenance

    1910, cast by Ambroise Vollard (b. 1867 - d. 1939), Paris. Before 1952, Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris (stock no. 03895; photo no. 52167) [see note 1]; January, 1952, sold by Galerie Louise Leiris to Svensk-Franska Konstgalleriet, Stockholm [see note 2]. Until 1968 (?), Theodor Ahrenberg, Stockholm [see note 3]. June or July, 1969, sold by Gerschmann to O'Hana Gallery, London (stock no. 1507) [see note 4]; 1969, sold by O'Hana Gallery to Jeffrey H. Loria and Co., New York [see note 5]. By 1972, William Beadleston, New York [see note 6]; about 1974/1975, sold by Beadleston to Gilbert Lehrman, Harrisburg, PA and Palm Beach, FL; 1976, gift of Gilbert Lehrman to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 12, 1977) NOTES: [1] According to a label on the underside of the sculpture. The Galerie Louise Leiris was founded in 1920 by Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler as the Galerie Simon (named after Kahnweiler's partner, André Simon). In 1940 it was turned over to Louise Leiris, Kahnweiler's sister-in-law, and was run under her name. [2] According to Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler (November 28, 1968) in a written statement made on the reverse of a photograph of the sculpture, in the MFA curatorial file. [3] Valerie J. Fletcher, "Process and Technique in Picasso's Head of a Woman (Fernande)," in Picasso: The Cubist Portraits of Fernande Olivier (exh. cat. National Gallery of Art, Washington and Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, 2003-2004), p. 186, n. 4. [4] According to correspondence from Sue Breakell, Archivist, Tate Gallery (January 12, 2005). The sculpture is authenticated by the O'Hana Gallery, London (July 3, 1969), on the reverse of a photograph in the MFA curatorial file and a label on the underside of the sculpture confirms the stock number. [5] According to Jeffrey H. Loria (December, 1976), in a written statement made on the reverse of a photograph of the sculpture, in the MFA curatorial file. [6] He lent it to the exhibition "Pablo Picasso: Important Paintings and Drawings" (M. Knoedler and Co., New York, November 24, 1972 - January 13, 1973), cat. no. 32.

    Credit Line

    Gift of D. Gilbert Lehrman

    Copyright

    © 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

    Details

    Dimensions

    41.3 x 24.8 x 26.7 cm (16 1/4 x 9 3/4 x 10 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1976.821

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze

    On View

    Saundra B. and William H. Lane Galleries (Gallery 328)

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Fantastic Inkwell (Self-Portrait as a Sphinx)

    French (Paris)
    1880
    Sarah Bernhardt (French, 1844–1923)

    Description

    Depicted with bat’s wings, and griffon’s tail, a horned skull supporting inkwell. Her profession as actress depicted by Tragic and Comic masks as epaulettes on her shoulders.


    Celebrated actress Sarah Bernhardt was also a sculptor, and this bronze inkwell is a self-portrait. In it, the body of a griffon, wings of a bat, and tail of a fish are combined into a mysterious image of the artist as a sphinx-a metaphor for her ability to transform herself, both on stage and off. The fantastic combination of natural forms is related to contemporary Art Nouveau jewelry and ornamentation as well as to the imagery and techniques of sixteenth-century Mannerist bronzes.

    Inscription

    Marked: Sarah Bernhardt on right base; 1880 on right base. Founder Mark: THIEBAUT FRERES/FONDEURS/PARIS

    Provenance

    1880, possibly with the artist and exhibited at the Union League Club, New York [see note 1]. 1973, Shepherd Gallery, New York [see note 2]; 1973, sold by the Shepherd Gallery to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 14, 1973) NOTES: [1] As suggested by Judith Applegate, MFA Bulletin 73, no. 369 (1975): 37, the MFA inkwell may be the third cast made, exhibited in New York in 1880. See "Sarah Bernhardt Souvenir, Including The Authorized Catalogue of Her Paintings and Sculpture" (New York, 1880), cat. no. 18. [2] In a letter to the MFA (October 9, 1973), Shepherd Gallery indicated that the inkwell was purchased "from an importer on Long Island who gave us no significant provenance on the piece."

    Credit Line

    Helen and Alice Colburn Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (without base): 31.8 x 34.9 x 31.8 cm (12 1/2 x 13 3/4 x 12 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1973.551a-d

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Head of an Angel

    Italian (Venice or Milan)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    first half of the 15th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    Before 1962, R. Hein and Bela Desco Hein (b. 1883 - d. 1931), Paris. By 1962, Jacques Seligmann & Co., New York. By 1969, John Goelet, New York; 1973, gift of John Goelet to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 9, 1974)

    Credit Line

    Gift of John Goelet in honor of Hanns Swarzenski

    Details

    Dimensions

    12.7 x 14 x 11.4 cm (5 x 5 1/2 x 4 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1973.693

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Nature Unveiling Herself Before Science

    French (Paris)
    About 1899
    Louis-Ernest Barrias (French, 1841–1905)

    Description

    Bronze with various surface patinations. Female figure, holding silvered veil away from face with both hands; breast and shoulders are naked (and gilt, as are face and hands); drapery under breast held by silvered scarab; drapery flows to bare, gilt feet.


    This allegorical statue presents Nature as a woman wrapped in a cloak that she lifts from her upper body to reveal her face and breasts. Mystery is evoked by the veil and the action of unveiling. Luxury is conveyed by the rich and varied surface colors, which include green, silver, and gold. The figure’s sinuous pose and the fine folds of the drapery reflect the naturalistic patterns typical of the Art Nouveau style.

    Signed

    Signed at the proper left edge of the base “E. Barrias” in script with an underscore line.

    Markings

    Cold stamp of the foundry inscribed at the inside edge of a circle “SUSSE FRERES EDITEURS·PARIS·” at the proper right edge of the base with a stamped “P” to the right of the circle.

    Provenance

    1974, sold by Michael Hall Fine Arts, New York, to the MFA. (Accession date: June 12, 1974)

    Credit Line

    Edwin E. Jack Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 58.4 x 23 x 15.5 cm (23 x 9 1/16 x 6 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1974.413

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze with various patinations, some areas silvered or gilded before patination

    Not On View

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  • Pair of Andirons

    French
    about 1928
    Jacques Lipchitz (French (born in Lithuania), 1891–1973)

    Description

    A pair of gilt-bronze andirons, supported by wrought iron supports at back and in the form of stylized geometric doves. See also 1986.4, a mantelpiece with identical to birds, facing each other.

    Provenance

    1928, commissioned by Jacques Doucet (b.1853 – d.1929) for the Cabinet de l'Orient, in his residence in Neuilly, France; 1929, at Doucet's death, presumably by inheritance to his wife, Jeanne Roger Doucet, Neuilly. Acquired from a private collection by Brame et Lorenceau, Paris [see note 1]; 1986, sold by Brame et Lorenceau to the MFA [see note 1]. (Accession Date: January 22, 1986) Notes: [1] According to information provided by Brame et Lorenceau to the MFA (December 6, 2002).

    Credit Line

    Samuel Putnam Avery Fund, Gift of William Sturgis Bigelow, Frederick Brown Fund, Bequest of Mrs. Arthur Croft—The Gardner Brewer Collection, Otis Norcross Fund, Gift of Mrs. Winthrop Sargent, Bequest of G. B. Upton, and Theodora Wilbour Fund in Memory of Zoë Wilbour, by exchange, and Gift of Charlotte F. and Irving W. Rabb

    Copyright

    © Estate of Jacques Lipchitz, courtesy, Marlborough Gallery, New York.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (1986.5): 37 x 27 x 58 cm (14 9/16 x 10 5/8 x 22 13/16 in.) Overall (1986.6): 37 x 27 x 57.9 cm (14 9/16 x 10 5/8 x 22 13/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    1986.5-6

    Medium or Technique

    Gilt bronze, iron

    Not On View

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  • Torso of Summer

    French
    about 1910–11
    Aristide Joseph Bonaventure Maillol (French, 1861–1944), Cast by Alexis Rudier Fondeur (French (Paris))

    Object Place: France

    Description

    Bronze. Nude female body.

    Inscription

    signed on proper right rear, near top, of base with monogram: A M

    Markings

    Marked 5/6 below monogram signature, with foundry mark on back of base: Alexis Rudier Fondeur, Paris

    Provenance

    July 1965, sold by Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, Inc., New York, to John J. Wilson, Marblehead, MA [1] ; 1986, donated by Mrs John J. Wilson (Dorothy Ann Wilson), Marblehead, MA, to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 21, 1987) NOTE: [1] from 1965 onwards, Mr. and Mrs. John J. Wilson lent the piece to the MFA until it was made a gift.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John J. Wilson

    Copyright

    © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

    Details

    Dimensions

    142.24 x 45.72 x 33.02 cm (56 x 18 x 13 in.)

    Accession Number

    1986.1022

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze, cast no. 5 of an edition of 6

    On View

    Corridor at Foot of Fenway Staircase (149)

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  • Eternal Springtime

    French
    modeled about 1881; cast about 1916–17
    Auguste (René) Rodin (French, 1840–1917)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Two young nude figures meet in kiss. Her legs graze the ground and her upper body is held in a taut arc and supported by the embrace of the male figure. He is posed precariously on the edge of a rocky mound, crossing his legs, extending his left foot beyond the sculpture base and his left arm in a full and graceful reach into space. On the rear, the male figure sports small pair of double wings, and female figure has a mass of floating hair, joining the flame motif on base.


    Rodin modeled Eternal Springtime while planning his monumental project The Gates of Hell, the bronze doors inspired by Dante’s Inferno that were commissioned in 1880 for a planned museum of decorative arts. The Gates of Hell were never finished; the original plaster version is now in the Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Although Rodin ultimately did not include Eternal Springtime in his composition for the doors, it is among his most celebrated works, daring in the precarious pose of the figures, their lean bodies extended into space, and in the complexity of convex and concave curves as the bodies intertwine.

    Inscription

    On proper left: à ma chere cousine Henriette Coltat, affectueux souvenir, A. Rodin. On back left: Alexis Rudier/Fondeur Paris

    Provenance

    About 1916-1917, cast by Rodin for his cousin, Henriette Coltat, Paris. 1922, Musée Rodin, Paris; 1922, sold by Musée Rodin to Mario Garcia Menocal (b. 1866 - d. 1941), 3rd President of Cuba. 1971, Antique Porcelain Company, New York (stock no. 9702); June 11, 1971, sold by the Antique Porcelain Company to William A. Coolidge (d. 1992), Topsfield and Cambridge, MA; 1993, bequest of William A. Coolidge to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 27, 1993)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of William A. Coolidge

    Details

    Dimensions

    62.86 cm (24 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1993.50

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze

    On View

    Sidney and Esther Rabb Gallery (Gallery 255)

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  • Allegorical figure of Historia

    English
    1744
    John Michael Rysbrack (English (born in Belgium), 1695–1760)

    Description

    This terra cotta representing History was a model for one of two allegorical figures on a proposed funerary monument for John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll and Greenwich; it appears on a highly finished drawing for the project. One of the most successful sculptors working in England in the mid-eighteenth century, Rysbrack had executed portrait busts of both the duke and duchess of Argyll, and he hoped to obtain the commission for the duke’s tomb in Westminster Abbey. In the end, however, the work was awarded to Rysbrack’s emerging rival, French sculptor Louis-François Roubilliac.

    Signed

    Signed and dated: Michael Rysbrack 1744.

    Provenance

    January 24-25, 1766, possibly in the posthumous Rysbrack sale, Langford and Sons, London, lot 71 [see note 1]. Private collection, Switzerland; March 19, 1997, anonymous (Swiss private collector) sale, Koller, Zürich, lot 505, to Alex Wengraf Ltd., London; 1997, sold by Alex Wengraf to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 17, 1997) NOTES: [1] According to information provided by Wengraf (after research by Katharine Eustace) at the time the sculpture was acquired. Lot 71 in the artist's sale was "A [figure] of History."

    Credit Line

    Mary S. and Edward Jackson Holmes Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 48 x 30.5 x 26.4 cm (18 7/8 x 12 x 10 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1997.142

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta

    On View

    Alan and Simone Hartman Galleries (Gallery 241)

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Baigneuse (Bather)

    French
    1900
    Aristide Joseph Bonaventure Maillol (French, 1861–1944), Cast by C. Valsuani, Paris

    Object Place: France

    Description

    Bronze, cast by Valsuani. Edition of 6, cast no. 5.


    One of the greatest sculptors of the twentieth century, Maillol focused on the representation of the female nude throughout his long career, first in paintings and tapestries, and after 1899, in sculpture. This figure is among the artist’s earliest sculptural studies, although the softly rounded, serene, classical style of his mature work is already evident. Valsuani, one of two foundries with which Maillol liked to work, cast this bronze from Maillol’s terracotta model. It was the artist’s custom to have only six bronzes made of a model, after which the mold was destroyed.

    Provenance

    By 1966, Marlborough-Gerson Gallery, Inc., New York; March 31, 1966, sold by Marlborough-Gerson Gallery to Harry and Leona Levine, Cambridge, MA; 1998, gift of the estate of Leona Levine. (Accession date: December 16, 1998)

    Credit Line

    Estate of Leona Levine

    Copyright

    © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 123.2 x 39.4 x 20.3 cm (48 1/2 x 15 1/2 x 8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1998.420

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze, edition of 6, cast no. 5

    Not On View

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  • Rape of a Sabine Woman

    Italian (Florence)
    mid-17th century
    Workshop of Ferdinando Tacca (Italian, 1619–1686), After Giambologna (Jean Boulogne) (Flemish (worked in Italy), 1529–1608)

    Description

    Roman with furrowed forehead and knitted brow, with pin-point pupils and incised irises. Sabine woman with hair curled off forehead in regular pattern, like a neat coiffure.


    This bronze relates to one of Giambologna’s most famous works, a large marble Rape of a Sabine in Florence. That sculpture shows a young man lifting a woman as an older man crouches below. Here, the group includes only two figures, but displays a similar balletic grace. It is a work meant to be seen from all angles. The scale of the bronze-neither small statuette nor monumental group-and its fine workmanship point to the workshop of Ferdinando Tacca, who inherited Giambologna’s models and studio from his father, Pietro Tacca, a member of Giambologna’s workshop.

    Provenance

    Duke Gaetano Saraceni, Rome. Duc de Talleyrand (perhaps Napoleon Louis von Sagan de Talleyrand Perigord, b. 1811 - d. 1898), Paris. 1966, Renato Bacchi, Milan; 1966, sold by Bacchi to Leopold Blumka and Rosenberg and Stiebel, New York; about 1966/1967, sold by Rosenberg and Stiebel to William Appleton Coolidge (b. 1901 - d. 1992), Topsfield and Cambridge, MA; 1993, bequest of William Appleton Coolidge to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 27, 1993)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of William A. Coolidge

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 101 x 45.7 x 33 cm (39 3/4 x 18 x 13 in.)

    Accession Number

    1993.49

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze

    Not On View

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  • Hercules and the Erymanthian Boar

    Italian (Florence)
    mid-17th century
    Attributed to Ferdinando Tacca (Italian, 1619–1686), After Giambologna (Jean Boulogne) (Flemish (worked in Italy), 1529–1608)

    Object Place: Florence, Italy

    Description

    Hercules carrying the Boar with its head facing backwards, steadying its weight with his right hand on its hind hoof, while his left hand rests on his hip.


    The ancient hero Hercules strides forward, carrying the still-struggling Erymanthean boar over his shoulder. Hercules’s powerful musculature and the naturalistic rendering of the beast create a vivid image, animated further by the drapery that billows out behind. The exceptionally fine cast and surface finish, as well as the accomplished distribution of weight through Hercules’s open stance, suggest that the sculpture was made by Ferdinando Tacca. Tacca’s workshop continued the tradition of virtuoso bronze casting in Florence in the decades after Giambologna’s death.

    Provenance

    Duke Gaetano Saraceni, Rome. Duc de Talleyrand (perhaps Napoleon Louis von Sagan de Talleyrand Perigord, b. 1811 - d. 1898), Paris. 1966, Renato Bacchi, Milan; 1966, sold by Bacchi to Leopold Blumka and Rosenberg and Stiebel, New York; about 1966/1967, sold by Rosenberg and Stiebel to William Appleton Coolidge (b. 1901 - d. 1992), Topsfield and Cambridge, MA; 1993, bequest of William Appleton Coolidge to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 27, 1993)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of William A. Coolidge

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 74.2 cm (29 3/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    1993.48

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze

    Not On View

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  • The Holy Families

    French
    probably 1700–10
    Pierre Etienne Monnot (French, 1657–1733)

    Object Place: Europe, Rome, Italy

    Description

    Terracotta. Relief depicting interior with Mary holding Christ Child with Joseph seated behind on right. Cradle in center. Young St. John seated holding a banner, St. Elizabeth and spouse left.


    This relief presents the Virgin and Child with St. Joseph, the young St. John the Baptist, St. Elizabeth, and St. Zachary. An angel is about to enter through the doorway at the back of the room. The figures are placed in a domestic setting that creates a feeling of intimacy focusing on the infant Jesus in his mother’s embrace. Although very likely a model for a marble relief, the terra cotta stands on its own as a work of art. Still in the artist’s possession at his death, it was a highly valued bequest to one of his executors.

    Provenance

    1733, bequeathed by the artist to Antonio Valeriani, Rome [1]. By 1983, consigned by Fiorentina, S. A. to Heim Gallery, London [2]; 1987, sold by Heim Gallery to Randolph J. Fuller, Boston, MA; 1987, gift of Randolph J. Fuller to the MFA. (Accession date: March 25, 1987) NOTES: [1] See P. Fusco, "Pierre-Etienne Monnot's Invetory After Death," Antologia di belle arti 33-34 (1988), 70-77, here 74, n. 71, fig. 6. [2] The relief was on loan at the MFA as an intended gift of Randolph J. Fuller from 1984.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Randolph J. Fuller

    Details

    Dimensions

    71.4 x 56.8 cm (28 1/8 x 22 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1987.212

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta

    On View

    Angelica Lloyd Russell Gallery (Gallery 142)

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    Sculpture

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  • Hebe and the Eagle of Zeus

    French
    1858
    Albert-Ernest Carrier-Belleuse (French, 1824–1887)

    Description

    Bronze on marble base. Female figure with elaborate coiffure and wearing classical drapery. She holds a ewer and cup and is seated on the back of a large eagle. Eagle has proper left wing raised to support back of figure. Signed: A. Carrier, 1858.


    This bronze represents Hebe, Greek goddess of youth and cupbearer to the gods, offering ambrosia to Zeus, who has taken the form of an eagle. Hebe’s elegant, complex pose, long neck, and elaborate hairstyle recall the courtly style of the sixteenth century, known as Mannerism. The fine finish and attention to surface detail reveal Carrier-Belleuse’s training as a goldsmith.

    Provenance

    By 1988, with Sandorval & Co., New York; 1988, sold by Sandorval & Co. to the MFA. (Accession Date: February 24, 1988)

    Credit Line

    Elizabeth Marie Paramino Fund in memory of John F. Paramino, Boston Sculptor

    Details

    Dimensions

    49.5 x 32.4 x 24.4 cm (19 1/2 x 12 3/4 x 9 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1988.98

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze

    Not On View

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  • Silhouette Geometrique

    1913
    Alexander Archipenko (Russian, 1887–1964)

    Description

    Stylized figure on squared black base. A circular lower section with projecting leg surmounted by rectangular section with angled side rising to a canopy which forms the shoulders. Concave oblong section forms the head. Blue-green patina.

    Inscription

    signed and dated, Archipenko 1913

    Markings

    no marks

    Provenance

    Probably by 1959, Perls Galleries, New York [see note 1]; early 1960s, sold by Perls Galleries to Susan Morse Hilles (b. 1905 - d. 2002), Boston [see note 2]; 1992, gift of Susan Morse Hilles to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 26, 1992) NOTES: [1] This is probably the sculpture that was included in the Perls Galleries exhibition, "Alexander Archipenko Bronzes," September 29 - October 24, 1959, cat. no. 6, as "Statuette Géométrique." [2] According to notes in the MFA curatorial file.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Susan Morse Hilles

    Copyright

    © Estate of Alexander Archipenko / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    Details

    Dimensions

    49.2 x 21 x 15.2 cm (19 3/8 x 8 1/4 x 6 in.)

    Accession Number

    1992.243

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze with blue and green patination

    Not On View

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  • Crouching Woman

    French
    1886
    Auguste (René) Rodin (French, 1840–1917)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    This image developed out of Rodin’s work on the bronze doors known as the Gates of Hell, particularly his exploration of ideas for the figures of the damned. He often reworked or reused figures to achieve new expressive goals. Here, the tight posture and the weight of the stone on the figure’s neck convey physical, spiritual, and emotional burdens almost too heavy to bear.

    Provenance

    Samuel Isham (b. 1855 - d. 1914), Paris and New York; 1914, the estate of Samuel Isham; 1917, gift of Julia Isham (Mrs. Henry Osborn Taylor), executrix of the estate, to the MFA. (Accession date: October 4, 1917)

    Credit Line

    From the Estate of Samuel Isham, N.A. Gift of Julia Isham (Mrs. Henry Osborn Taylor), Executrix

    Details

    Dimensions

    H: 17 11/16 in; W: 14 1/8 in; D: 13 3/8 in

    Accession Number

    17.3133

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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    Europe

    Classifications

    Silver hollowware

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  • Female Head

    French (central France)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    second half of 15th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Provenance

    1919, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Templeman Coolidge. (Accession date: March 6, 1919)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Templeman Coolidge

    Details

    Dimensions

    24.1 x 24.1 x 15.2 cm (9 1/2 x 9 1/2 x 6 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.69

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone

    Not On View

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  • Retable of the Virgin

    Spanish (Anglesola, Lérida)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1320
    Unidentified artist, Spanish, 14th century

    Description

    Provenance

    About 1320, the Church of Anglesola, Lérida, Spain (original commission); 1907, removed from the church and taken to Barcelona by Francisco Llorens, Barcelona [see note 1]; sold by Llorens to the Lowengard family, Paris [see note 2]; March 3, 1911, Lowengard sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 113, unsold; subsequently taken to the United States by the Lowengard family and sold. 1924, George Grey Barnard (b. 1863 - d. 1938), New York [see note 3]; 1924, sold by Barnard to the MFA for $65,000. (Accession Date: April 3, 1924) NOTES: [1] In a letter to Edward J. Holmes of the MFA (July 27, 1926), Joseph Pijoan, at that time a visiting professor at Harvard University, indicated that the retable had come from Anglesola, and that it had been taken to Barcelona in 1907 "by a carpenter...whom we used to call Francisquet, or 'little Francis'. He had his shop on the street of Carrer de la Palla and he offered your altar to the Barcelona museum...at this time I was a member of the commission in charge of the museum and I was appointed with three others to examine the stone at Francisquet's shop." Also see Pijoan's article, "L'altar d'Anglesola al Museu de Boston," Gaseta de les Arts 3, no. 57 (September 15, 1926), p. 1. [2] The provenance of the retable is further discussed by Paul Tachard, "A propósito del retablo de Piedra de Anglesola," Gaseta de les Arts 3, no. 59 (October 15, 1926), pp. 3-5. [3] When Barnard offered the retable to the MFA, he claimed that it was "found on a farm near Pau, evidently from the King's Chapel at Pau, but buried during the Revolution. ... I came in possession of this treasure many years ago but the French Government ... held it for eight years intending to place it, so I am told, in the Louvre, only through my excellent relations and as owner it was recently released...and sent to me." (Letter to the MFA, February 23, 1924.) Barnard's fabricated account of the retable's origins was undoubtedly intended to increase its rarity and artistic value.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Walter Scott Fitz, Edward Jackson Holmes, John Nicholas Brown and Purchase: Marie Antoinette Evans Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 106.7 x 245.1 x 19.7 cm, 907.2 kg (42 x 96 1/2 x 7 3/4 in., 2000 lb.) Framed (Steel channel armature L-frame): 109.2 x 205.7 x 17.8 cm (43 x 81 x 7 in.)

    Accession Number

    24.149

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intramicrite

    Not On View

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  • Saint Jude

    Spanish (Burgos)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1500–05
    Workshop of Gil de Siloe (Spanish, about 1495–1563)

    Object Place: Europe, Spain

    Description

    This figure is part of a set with 18.317 and 18.318 (Saint John the Evangelist and Saint Bartholomew).

    Provenance

    From about 1500-05 until the 19th century, tomb of Juan de Padilla, Monastery of Fresdelval, Burgos, Spain (original commission; tomb dismantled in the 19th century) [see note 1]. De Bligny collection, France. By 1916, Bacri Frères, Paris; 1917, sold by Bacri, through Walter Gay, to the MFA for $1042.23 (Accession Date: June 6, 1918) NOTES: [1] For further discussion, see Dorothy Gillerman, ed., "Gothic Sculpture in America: 1. The New England Museums" (New York, 1989), cat. no. 80, pp. 112-113.

    Credit Line

    Harriet Otis Cruft Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    70.17 x 22.2 x 12.7 cm (27 5/8 x 8 3/4 x 5 in.)

    Accession Number

    18.316

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster

    Not On View

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  • Statuette of Saint John the Evangelist

    Spanish (Burgos)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1500–05
    Workshop of Gil de Siloe (Spanish, about 1495–1563)

    Object Place: Europe, Spain

    Description

    This figure is part of a set with 18.316 and 18.318 (Saint Simon Zelotes or Saint Jude and Saint Bartholomew).

    Provenance

    From about 1500-05 until the 19th century, tomb of Juan de Padilla, Monastery of Fresdelval, Burgos, Spain (original commission; tomb dismantled in the 19th century) [see note 1]. De Bligny collection, France. By 1916, Bacri Frères, Paris; 1917, sold by Bacri, through Walter Gay, to the MFA for $2386.36 [see note 2]. (Accession Date: June 6, 1918) NOTES: [1] For further discussion, see Dorothy Gillerman, ed., "Gothic Sculpture in America: 1. The New England Museums" (New York, 1989), cat. no. 80, pp. 112-113. [2] MFA accession numbers 03.317 and 03.318 were purchased together for $2386.36.

    Credit Line

    Sarah Elizabeth Simpson Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    72.4 x 22.2 x 18.4 cm (28 1/2 x 8 3/4 x 7 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    18.317

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster

    Not On View

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  • Statuette of Saint Bartholomew

    Spanish (Burgos)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1500–05
    Workshop of Gil de Siloe (Spanish, about 1495–1563)

    Object Place: Europe, Spain

    Description

    This figure is part of a set with 18.316 and 18.317 (Saint Simon Zelotes or Saint Jude and Saint John the Evangelist).

    Provenance

    From about 1500-05 until the 19th century, tomb of Juan de Padilla, Monastery of Fresdelval, Burgos, Spain (original commission; tomb dismantled in the 19th century) [see note 1]. De Bligny collection, France. By 1916, Bacri Frères, Paris; 1917, sold by Bacri, through Walter Gay, to the MFA for 13,650fr. (Accession Date: June 6, 1918) NOTES: [1] For further discussion, see Dorothy Gillerman, ed., "Gothic Sculpture in America: 1. The New England Museums" (New York, 1989), cat. no. 80, pp. 112-113.

    Credit Line

    Sarah Elizabeth Simpson Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.3 x 18.4 x 22.86 cm (28 7/8 x 7 1/4 x 9 in.)

    Accession Number

    18.318

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster

    Not On View

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  • Trumpeting Angel

    German (Upper Rhineland, probably Offenburg)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1475–1500
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Rhineland/Meuse/North Germany, Germany

    Description

    This trumpeting angel is a boss, a block that marked the intersection of rib vaults on the ceiling of a Gothic church. Decorative bosses were common features of German architecture, especially from the thirteenth century onwards. Imagery of music was popular in church interiors, reflecting both the music of religious ceremonies and the belief in music’s close association with heaven.

    Markings

    Mason's mark on back???

    Provenance

    Possibly from a church in Offenburg, Germany [see note 1]. 1927, Hugo Benario, Berlin; April 5, 1927, Benario sale, Lepke, Berlin, lot 101. Carl von Weinberg (b. 1861 - d. 1943), Frankfurt [see note 2]. By 1956, Wilhelm Henrich (d. 1980), Frankfurt; 1956, sold by Henrich to the MFA for $596.50. (Accession Date: December 13, 1956) NOTES: [1] According to Hanns Swarzenski's curatorial recommendation for the object's purchase (December 13, 1956). [2] In 1938 Carl von Weinberg was forced to sell his entire art collection and his home to the city of Frankfurt for its museums. In 1939 he fled Nazi Germany and emigrated to Italy, where he died in 1943. In 1945/46 Allied forces recovered from Frankfurt museums the objects that had been sold under duress. Carl von Weinberg's property was restituted in 1950 to his son-in-law, Richard von Szilvinyi (d. 1966), who consigned much of it to the dealer Wilhelm Henrich for sale. At the time of its acquisition, this sculpture was said to have come from the Weinberg collection, which suggests that it was among the objects restituted and consigned to Henrich. However, it has not been identified in the list of 208 sculptures seized in 1938 from Weinberg, which went to the Stadtische Galerie, Frankfurt, and were returned.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    40.6 x 38.13 x 39.4 cm (16 x 15 x 15 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    56.1182

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; painted sandstone

    Not On View

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  • Seated Christ or Apostle

    German (Middle Rhine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1420
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany, Middle Rhine

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1940, Martha (Mrs. Ernest M.) Heiden, New Rochelle, NY; September 10, 1943, sold by Mrs. Heiden to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N5560). 1960, Dr. Eugen Grabscheid, New York; 1960, gift of Grabscheid to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 14, 1960)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Dr. Eugen Grabscheid

    Details

    Dimensions

    63.5 x 18.41 x 18.41 cm (25 x 7 1/4 x 7 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    60.16

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Saint John the Baptist

    English
    Medieval (Gothic)
    15th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, England

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1916, Frank G. Macomber (b. 1849 - d. 1941), Boston [see note 1]. By 1942, J. Robert Peck; 1942, sold by Peck to the MFA for $5. (Accession Date: September 11, 1942) NOTES: [1] From May 4, 1916 through November 11, 1916, this sculpture was lent by Macomber to the MFA.

    Credit Line

    Helen and Alice Coburn Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    43.2 x 12.1 x 7.3 cm (17 x 4 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    42.396

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Madonna and Child

    French
    Medieval (Gothic)
    mid-13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France, Mosan

    Description

    Provenance

    1912, Bacri Frères, Paris; 1912, sold by Bacri Frères to the Western Art Visiting Committee for the MFA. (Accession Date: December 5, 1912)

    Credit Line

    Gift of the Western Art Visiting Committee

    Details

    Dimensions

    80 x 30.5 x 23.5 cm (31 1/2 x 12 x 9 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    12.1173

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Saint Christopher

    Netherlandish or French (?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    About 1430–50
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, The Netherlands

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1945, Arnold Seligmann, Rey & Co., Paris; 1945, sold by Seligmann, Rey & Co to the MFA for $400. (Accession date: December 13, 1945)

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    32.4 x 14.0 x 11.4 cm (12 3/4 x 5 1/2 x 4 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.840

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone with polychromy

    Not On View

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    Sculpture

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  • A Hypochondriac

    Austrian
    about 1775-80
    Franz Xaver Messerschmidt (Austrian, 1736–1783)

    Object Place: Europe, Austria

    Description

    Head of grimacing bald man from square block with incised numeral 36.


    Late in his life, Messerschmidt devoted himself to a series of forty-nine sculptures known as “Character Heads.” In this series, he studied his features in a mirror and represented them in various grimacing, pinched, or smiling expressions. Linked to the interest in physiognomy current in the later eighteenth century, the Character Heads also indicate Messerschmidt’s fragile psychological state. Head of a Hypochondriac is marked on the base as number 36 in the series.

    Provenance

    1793, exhibited in Vienna [see note 1]. 1956, Johannes Jantzen, Bad Homburg, Germany; 1957, sold by Jantzen through Ernst E. Kofler, Lucerne, to the MFA for $2,880. (Accession Date: February 14, 1957) NOTES: [1] After Messerschmidt's death in 1783, a series of "character heads" were discovered in his studio. Of the 69 found, 49 were exhibited in Vienna in 1793. See "Wiener Zeitung" 89 (November 6, 1793), 5. The MFA bust is the original "Hypochondriac" (36th in the series).

    Credit Line

    William E. Nickerson Fund, No. 2

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 42.6 x 25 x 23 cm (16 3/4 x 9 13/16 x 9 1/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    57.117

    Medium or Technique

    Lead

    On View

    Charlotte F. and Irving W. Rabb Gallery (Gallery 155)

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Young Columbus

    Il Colombo giovanetto

    Italian (Rome)
    19th century
    1871
    Giulio Monteverde (Italian, 1837–1917)

    Object Place: Europe, Rome, Italy

    Description

    Made in Rome.

    Provenance

    1871, sold by the artist to Augustus Porter Chamberlaine (b. 1827 - d. 1909), Aigle, Switzerland, for the MFA. (Accession Date: December 1, 1871)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Augustus Porter Chamberlain

    Details

    Dimensions

    145 cm (57 1/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    71.8

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    On View

    Link between: Americans Abroad, and Newport Furniture (137.1)

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Angel or saint

    German (Augsburg)
    early 18th century
    Ehrgott Bernhard Bendl (1660–1738)

    Object Place: Augsburg, Germany

    Description

    Polychromed wood. Richly gilded drapery, strap across right shoulder, right arm raised, left outstretched (small finger broken). Reddish flesh tones. Sandal thongs woven to below knee.

    Provenance

    By 1957, John Hunt, London and Dublin; 1958, sold by Hunt to the MFA for £2700. (Accession Date: February 13, 1958) NOTES: [1] MFA accession numbers 58.43 and 58.44 were purchased together for this price.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    243.84 cm (96 in.)

    Accession Number

    58.44

    Medium or Technique

    Polychromed wood

    On View

    Thomas Jefferson Coolidge III Gallery (Gallery 248)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Portal facade and sculptural elements

    Spanish (San Miguel de Uncastillo)
    Medieval (Romanesque)
    about 1150–1200
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: San Miguel, Europe, Uncastillo, Spain

    Description

    Portal facade and sculptural elements from the church of San Miguel de Uncastillo, Spain.

    Provenance

    1915, upon the sale of the church, removed from San Miguel de Uncastillo, Spain. By 1927, Salvador Babra (dealer), Barcelona; 1928, sold by Salvador Babra to the MFA for $42782. (Accession Date: February 2, 1928)

    Credit Line

    Francis Bartlett Donation of 1912

    Details

    Dimensions

    Doorway: 267 x 137 cm (105 1/8 x 53 15/16 in.) Portal (1): 491 cm (193 5/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    28.32

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; sandstone

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Columns and capitals

    More Info
  • Japanese Pottery

    Object Place: Japan

    Description

    Credit Line

    Morse Collection. Museum purchase with funds donated by contribution

    Details

    Accession Number

    92.3526

    Medium or Technique

    Ceramic

    Not On View

    Collections

    Asia

    Classifications

    Ceramics

    More Info
  • Angel or saint

    German (Augsburg)
    early 18th century
    Ehrgott Bernhard Bendl (1660–1738)

    Object Place: Augsburg, Germany

    Description

    Polychromed wood. Richly gilded drapery in knot at waist, left arm raised, outstretched right hand repaired. Yellowish flesh tones, red on left leg with sandal thongs below knee. On uneven base.

    Provenance

    By 1957, John Hunt, London and Dublin; 1958, sold by Hunt to the MFA for £2700. (Accession Date: February 13, 1958) NOTES: [1] MFA accession numbers 58.43 and 58.44 were purchased together for this price.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    243.84 cm (96 in.)

    Accession Number

    58.43

    Medium or Technique

    Polychromed wood

    On View

    Thomas Jefferson Coolidge III Gallery (Gallery 248)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

    More Info
  • Bust of Christ

    Italian, Venice
    Renaissance
    about 1500
    Possibly by Cristoforo Solari (Italian (Milan), about 1468/70–1524)

    Description

    Marble Bust of Christ.


    This powerful sculpture probably once decorated a church interior. It displays sensitive modeling of the face and neck as well as carefully worked undercutting and incising of the long flowing hair and beard. The idealizing style and high quality of this bust make it an important example of Venetian sculpture around 1500. Another version is in the Church of San Pantalon in Venice.

    Provenance

    Quincy Adams Shaw (b. 1825 - d. 1908), Boston; 1917, gift of Quincy Adams Shaw, through Quincy Adams Shaw, Jr., and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton, to the MFA. (Accession Date: March 29, 1917)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Quincy Adams Shaw through Quincy Adams Shaw, Jr., and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton

    Details

    Dimensions

    49.5 x 55.9 x 34.3 cm (19 1/2 x 22 x 13 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.1480

    Medium or Technique

    Marble

    On View

    Italian Renaissance Gallery (Gallery 206)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Saint Christopher

    Italian or Northern European
    Renaissance
    15th century
    Unidentified artist, Italian or Northern European, 15th century (Italian or Northern European)

    Description

    Bronze. Walking, bending to carry missing Child on left shoulder. Portion of staff remains in raised right hand. Hole in hem of robe and back of right knee. Dated on sole of left foot, both feet doweled for fastening.


    This statuette of Saint Christopher (who carried a now-missing figure of the Christ Child) is an example-in his lyrical drapery and finely detailed face-of the International Style current in Europe in the early fifteenth century.

    Inscription

    1407

    Provenance

    István (Stephen) Marczibányi, Budapest (b. 1752 - d. 1810); by inheritance within the family to István (Steven) Rakovszky (b. 1847 - d. 1910), Budapest [see note 1]; about 1912, sold by the family of Rakovszky to an anonymous dealer, who on the same day sold it to to Emil Delmár (b. 1876 - d. 1959), Budapest and New York; 1951, sold by Emil Delmár to the MFA for $16,000. (Accession Date: March 8, 1951) Notes: [1] The provenance of this sculpture was provided by Emil Delmár at the time of its acquisition. Delmár shipped his art collection out of Hungary and into Switzerland in 1938 and 1939. This sculpture was included in an exhibition of his collection held at the Kunstmuseum Bern in 1939/1940, "Kunst und Kunstgewerbe: Sonderausstellung" (1939-1940), cat. no. 7. The collection remained at the Kunstmuseum until the end of World War II, by which time Delmár had emigrated to New York. The collection was shipped to him there between 1945 and 1948. See Andrea Rózsavölgyi, "20 Years in Emigration: Emil Delmár and the Disintegration of His Collection," in Studies on Art and Architecture in Hungary, ed. Anna Tüskés (Budapest, 2012), 239-252.

    Credit Line

    Arthur Tracy Cabot Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    20.3 x 11 x 6 cm (8 x 4 5/16 x 2 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    51.412

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze

    On View

    Italian Renaissance Gallery (Gallery 206)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

    More Info
  • Avarice

    French (south central France or Limousin)
    Medieval (Romanesque)
    second quarter of the 12th century

    Object Place: Europe, Limousin or south central France

    Description

    Provenance

    1929, Mme. Trichard; June 15, 1929, sold by Trichard to Joseph Brummer (b. 1833 - d. 1947), New York (stock no. P6069); 1948, sold by the estate of Joseph Brummer to the MFA for $1200. (Accession Date: March 11, 1948)

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 62 x 31.5 x 23 cm, 64.9 kg (24 7/16 x 12 3/8 x 9 1/16 in., 143 lb.) Framed (Two steel wall angles brackets / keyhole slots): 57.2 x 5.1 x 0.6 cm (22 1/2 x 2 x 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.255

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

    More Info
  • Relief with Eagle and Lion

    Italian (Central Italy)
    Medieval (Romanesque)
    second half of the 12th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Central Italy

    Description

    Provenance

    1928, Alfredo Barsanti, Rome; September 10, 1928, sold by Barsanti to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P5574); June 9, 1949, Brummer sale, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, lot 605, to the MFA for $100 [see note 1]. (Accession Date: June 9, 1949) NOTES: [1] MFA accession nos. 49.532 and 49.533 were acquired together.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    34.92 x 31.8 x 12.7 cm (13 3/4 x 12 1/2 x 5 in.)

    Accession Number

    49.532

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Caryatid

    English (Lincoln?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    first half of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, England

    Description

    Part of a set with 62.670

    Provenance

    Possibly from the destroyed presbytery adjoining Lincoln Cathedral, England [see note 1]. About 1930s, with Brimo de Larousselhe, Paris; sold by Brimo de Laroussilhe to Edward Fowles (1885-1971), Paris, London and New York, NY [see note 2]; 1962, sold by Fowles to the MFA for $2,000 [see note 3]. (Accession date: September 19, 1962) NOTES: [1] As reported by Brimo de Laroussilhe, according to Fowles. See P. Kidson, and J. Cannon, Courtauld Instituted Illustration Archives, Archive I: Cathedrals and Monastic Buildings in the British Isles, Part 7: Lincoln, London, 1978, 89-96, 150-64. Also see D. Gillerman, in "Gothic Sculpture in America," 1989, p. 50. [2] Edward Fowles directed the Paris office of Duveen Brothers, Inc., from 1917 to 1938. He purchased the firm in 1939. In a letter of August 10, 1962 to Hanns Swarzenski, Fowles states that he purchased the sculptures from Brimo de Larousselhe for his private Paris residence "some thirty years ago." Fowles also notes that the sculptures "were lost during the war" but that they were later found. [3] MFA accession nos. 62.669-62.670 were purchased together for this amount.

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    137.16 x 26.0 x 25.4 cm (54 x 10 1/4 x 10 in.)

    Accession Number

    62.669

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; oak

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Corbel of Dozing Man, "Acedia"

    English
    Medieval (Gothic)
    13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, England

    Description

    Provenance

    Acquired in London by John Hewett (b. 1919 - d. 1994), London [see note 1]. 1955, H.M. Calmann, London; 1955, sold by Calmann to the MFA for £100. (Accession Date: January 13, 1955) NOTES: [1] According to Georg Swarzenski, "A Head from Rheims and an English Corbel," MFA Bulletin 53, no. 294 (Winter, 1955), p. 73, n. 2, the corbel had been "acquired in London by John Hewett".

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    41.9 x 43.2 x 76.2 cm (16 1/2 x 17 x 30 in.)

    Accession Number

    55.9

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intramicrite

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Saint John

    German (Franconia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1500
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Part of Crucifixion Group set with Virgin (45.839).

    Provenance

    Dr. Albert Figdor (b. 1843 - d. 1927), Vienna; September 29-30, 1930, posthumous Figdor sale, Paul Cassirer, Berlin, lot 203, sold for M 3,200. 1945, Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co., New York; 1945, sold by Seligmann Rey and Co. to the MFA for $900 [see note 1]. (Accession Date: December 13, 1945) NOTES: [1] MFA accession numbers 45.838 - 45.839 acquired together.

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    19.05 cm (7 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.838

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Virgin

    German (Franconia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1500
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Nuremberg, Germany

    Description

    Part of Crucifixion Group set with Saint John (45.838).

    Provenance

    Dr. Albert Figdor (b. 1843 - d. 1927), Vienna; September 29-30, 1930, posthumous Figdor sale, Paul Cassirer, Berlin, lot 203, sold for M 3,200. 1945, Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co., New York; 1945, sold by Seligmann Rey and Co. to the MFA for $900 [see note 1]. (Accession Date: December 13, 1945) NOTES: [1] MFA accession numbers 45.838 - 45.839 acquired together.

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    18.41 x 6.0 x 4.1 cm (7 1/4 x 2 3/8 x 1 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.839

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

    More Info
  • Saint Barbara

    French (Alsace)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1490
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany, Rhineland

    Description

    Provenance

    February, 1944, sold by Lewis Valentine Randall (formerly Ludwig Rosenthal, b. 1893 - d. 1972), Montreal, to Schaeffer Galleries, New York (stock no. 962); 1947, sold by Schaeffer to the MFA for $1200. (Accession date: April 10, 1947)

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated by Mrs. Charles Gaston Smith's Group

    Details

    Dimensions

    81.3 x 22.9 x 18.4 cm (32 x 9 x 7 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1020

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Self Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt

    French
    dated 1878
    Sarah Bernhardt (French, 1844–1923)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Oval bronze plaque with profile portrait in relief of Sarah Bernhardt wearing a plumed hat and bow at her neck.

    Inscription

    Inscribed on front: "A Mon Amie Louise Abbema, Sarah Bernhardt 1878". Signed on back: "S. Martin, Fondeur"

    Provenance

    1878, given by the artist to Louis Abbema (b. 1858 - d. 1927) [see note 1]. June 16, 1978, possibly anonymous sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 15 [see note 2]. 1989, Sandorval and Co., Inc., New York; 1989, sold by Sandorval to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 21, 1989) NOTES: [1] Abbema was also an artist and a close friend of Sarah Bernhardt. The self-portrait is inscribed: "A Mon Amie Louise Abbema, Sarah Bernhardt 1878." [2] It has not yet been established whether the object in this sale is the MFA object, or a variant of nearly identical dimensions.

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund and Gift of Robert A. Radloff and Ann Beha

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 21.5 x 18.1 x 3.8 cm (8 7/16 x 7 1/8 x 1 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1989.196

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Figure of Saint Barbara

    German (Lower Bavaria)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1520
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Regensburg, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    Acquired from I. and S. Goldschmidt, Frankfurt, by Otto H. Kahn (b. 1867 - d. 1934), New York; 1934, to the Mogmar Art Foundation, New York [see note 1] and consigned to Duveen Brothers, New York; 1945, sold by Duveen to the MFA for $1200 [see note 2]. (Accession Date: May 10, 1945) NOTES: [1] That this sculpture was acquired from Goldschmidt is according to an inventory of the Mogmar Art Foundation (June 26, 1934) on file at the Getty Research Institute (Duveen Brothers Records, Box 472), cat. no. MAF 33. The Mogmar Art Foundation was a private corporation that kept parts of Kahn's art collection after his death. Pieces from the collection were stored with Duveen, New York, beginning in June, 1934.

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated by Mrs. Charles Gaston Smith's Group

    Details

    Dimensions

    83.18 x 22.9 x 21.0 cm (32 3/4 x 9 x 8 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.474

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Statuette of Saint Barbara

    Southern Netherlandish or Northern French
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1520
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    Possibly Thomas Fortune Ryan (b. 1851 - d. 1928), New York [see note 1]. 1933, purchased by the MFA for $1050. (Accession Date: December 7, 1933) NOTES: [1] Thomas Fortune Ryan sale catalogue #291, as noted on MFA object card.

    Credit Line

    H. E. Bolles Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    63.5 x 25.1 x 12.4 cm (25 x 9 7/8 x 4 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    33.657

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with extensive remains of (recent) polychromy

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Capital: The Life of John the Baptist

    French
    Medieval (Gothic)
    early 13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Provenance

    From the Abby Church of Saint Pons de Thomières, France. By 1908, Mme Marty [see note 1]. By 1921, with Demotte; 1921, sold by Demotte, through the Fogg Museum of Art, to the MFA. (Accession Date January 5, 1922) NOTES: [1] J. Sahuc ("L'Art roman à Saint-Pons-de Thomières," 1908) recorded this capital amongst others in the collection "chez Mme Marty," see G. Wright, in ed. D. Gillerman, "Gothic Sculpture in America," 1989, Vol. 1, p.11.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Bequest Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    38.1 x 34.3 x 32.4 cm (15 x 13 1/2 x 12 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    22.53

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; foliated marble

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Madonna and Child

    Italian
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1325–75
    Follower of Tino di Camaino (Italian, about 1280–1337)

    Description

    Provenance

    1926, purchased by the MFA for $5022.47. (Accession date: September 9, 1926)

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 57.8 x 21 x 20.3 cm (22 3/4 x 8 1/4 x 8 in.)

    Accession Number

    26.162

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Apostle

    Spanish (Farrera, Catalonia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    early 13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Spain

    Description

    Part of the Farrera Frontal.

    Provenance

    Part of an altar frontal from a church in Farrera, Lerida, Catalonia, Spain [see note 1]. Altar frontal with C. Dupont, dealer, Barcelona, Spain. By about 1919, with Olaguer Junyent [see note 2]; sold by Junyent to Luis Plandiura; sold by Planidura to Joaquin Cabrejo, dealer, Madrid, Spain; 1921, sold by Cabrejo to Herbert Weissberger, New York, NY; 1921, the altar frontal and the 4 standing figures, including this present figure, offered for sale by Weissberger at Almoneda Collection sale, American Art Association, lot 573, but bought in. By 1928, with Seligman, Rey and Company, New York, NY; 1928, sold by Seligman, Rey and Company to Frank Gair Macomber, Palm Beach, FL; 1933, gift of Frank Gair Macomber to the MFA. (Accession date: November 2, 1933) NOTES: [1] See D. Gillerman, ed., "Gothic Sculpture in America," Vol. 1, 1989, p. 103-104 and Walter W.S. Cook, "Lost Spanish Altar Frontals," Gazette des Beaux Arts, October 1956. [2] Between 1919-1921, this figure was removed from the altar frontal.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Frank Gair Macomber

    Details

    Dimensions

    31.8 x 7.0 x 4.8 cm (12 1/2 x 2 3/4 x 1 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    33.642

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Maquette of Van Gogh as Predicateur

    1956
    Ossip Zadkine (Russian (active in Paris from 1909), 1890–1967)

    Description

    Sculpture

    Inscription

    "Susse Foundr Paris" on back of bask; "O.C. Zakine 1/10" on proper left side

    Provenance

    1967, sold by the artist to Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh; 2002, gift of Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh. (Accession date: December 18, 2002)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh

    Copyright

    © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 52.1 x 15.2 x 11.4 cm (20 1/2 x 6 x 4 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    2002.632

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze

    Not On View

    Collections

    Contemporary Art, Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Study for The Deluge

    French
    about 1800
    Claude Michel, called Clodion (French, 1738–1814)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Standing figure of a nude male carrying the body of a youth over his right shoulder. Drapery encircles the hips of the youth and falls along the right side of the standing man and over his right thigh. The figure stands on a square rocky base with a helme

    Provenance

    Between the late 1950s and 1968, probably purchased in France by Joseph H. Hirshhorn (b. 1899 - d. 1981), Cap d’Antibes [1]; 1981, at Hirshhorn's death, bequeathed to the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. (Inv. No. S.86.48); deaccessioned by the Hirshhorn; November 1, 1989, Hirshhorn Museum sale, Christie's, New York, to Anthony Roth, Fine Arts Ltd., London; sold by Anthony Roth to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 29, 1989) NOTE: [1] Anne L. Poulet, “Clodion’s Sculpture of the Déluge,” Journal of the Museum of Fine Arts 3 (1991), 51-76, here 72, endnote 16

    Credit Line

    Mary S. and Edward Jackson Holmes Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 26.3 x 15 x 9.8cm (10 3/8 x 5 7/8 x 3 7/8in.)

    Accession Number

    1989.310

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Caryatid

    English (Lincoln?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    first half of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, England

    Description

    Part of a set with 62.669

    Provenance

    Possibly from the destroyed presbytery adjoining Lincoln Cathedral, England [see note 1]. About 1930s, with Brimo de Larousselhe, Paris; sold by Brimo de Laroussilhe to Edward Fowles (1885-1971), Paris, London and New York, NY [see note 2]; 1962, sold by Fowles to the MFA for $2,000 [see note 3]. (Accession date: September 19, 1962) NOTES: [1] As reported by Brimo de Laroussilhe, according to Fowles. See P. Kidson, and J. Cannon, Courtauld Instituted Illustration Archives, Archive I: Cathedrals and Monastic Buildings in the British Isles, Part 7: Lincoln, London, 1978, 89-96, 150-64. Also see D. Gillerman, in "Gothic Sculpture in America," 1989, p. 50. [2] Edward Fowles directed the Paris office of Duveen Brothers, Inc., from 1917 to 1938. He purchased the firm in 1939. In a letter of August 10, 1962 to Hanns Swarzenski, Fowles states that he purchased the sculptures from Brimo de Larousselhe for his private Paris residence "some thirty years ago." Fowles also notes that the sculptures "were lost during the war" but that they were later found. [3] MFA accession nos. 62.669-62.670 were purchased together for this amount.

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    135.89 x 29.2 x 25.4 cm (53 1/2 x 11 1/2 x 10 in.)

    Accession Number

    62.670

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; oak

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

    More Info
  • Male Nude (David?)

    Italian, Florence
    Renaissance
    mid-16th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Florence, Italy

    Description

    Model in wax for statue.


    Wax is a versatile modeling material that remains soft and can accommodate changes as the sculptor works. In the Renaissance, sculptors used wax to work out ideas for figures and compositions in small three-dimensional “sketches.” This figure of a man retains a wire framework around which the wax was modeled; the wire, in turn, supported the wax. This piece may have served as a working model in preparation for a final sculpture in bronze or clay.

    Provenance

    By 1924, Elia Volpi (b. 1858 - d. 1938), Florence [see note 1]; March 31 - April 2, 1927, Volpi sale, American Art Galleries, New York, not in catalogue, not sold [see note 2]; 1929, sold by Volpi to Wilhelm von Bode for the MFA. (Accession Date: December 5, 1929) NOTES: [1] See letter from Philip Gentner in Florence to Charles Henry Hawes of the MFA (September 25, 1924), which discusses the object along with others then in Volpi's possession, and a letter from Wilhelm von Bode to Elia Volpi (April 3, 1925) which discusses the object, stating specifically that it was in Volpi's possession at that time. [2] See Roberta Ferrazza, "Palazzo Davanzati e le collezioni di Elia Volpi" (Florence, 1994), pp. 130, 142, n. 177.

    Credit Line

    Maria Antoinette Evans Fund and Francis Bartlett Donation, by exchange

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (height including base): 83.8 cm (33 in.)

    Accession Number

    29.1085

    Medium or Technique

    Wax

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Saint Michael Weighing Souls

    French (Central France)
    Medieval
    early 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Limestone. left arm gone, scales held in right broken, claw supports lowered balance. Neck restored. From a chapel in France.

    Provenance

    Parish church of La Cellette, Creuse, France [see note 1]. Stefan von Auspitz (b. 1869 - d. 1945), Vienna; 1931, consigned to the K. W. Bachstitz Gallery, The Hague [see note 2]; December 31, 1931, sold by Bachstitz to Oscar Bondy (b. 1870 - d. 1944) and Elisabeth Bondy, Vienna [see note 3]; 1938, confiscated from Oscar and Elisabeth by Nazi forces (no. OB 1127); stored at the Central Depot, Neue Burg, Vienna and selected for the Führermuseum, Linz [see note 4]; removed to the monastery of Kremsmünster (no. Kku 397) and subsequently to Alt Aussee; July 4, 1945, recovered by Allied forces and taken to the Munich Central Collecting Point (no. 2459) [see note 5]; March 15, 1948, released to the United States Forces in Austria and restituted to Elisabeth Bondy, New York; probably sold by Mrs. Bondy to Blumka Gallery, New York [see note 6]; 1949, sold by Blumka to the MFA for $1350. (Accession Date: February 10, 1949) NOTES: [1] According to information on file at the RKD, the Hague (RKD Archief Bachstitz Gallery/Stock Book Auspitz Collection, I, no. 589, "Sculpture in Stone"). [2] Stefan von Auspitz was a banker at the Bankhaus Auspitz, Lieben & Co., Vienna. After the company declared bankruptcy in 1931 the Austrian government seized the bank and the property of its directors. Auspitz's collection of art was sold to Daniel George van Beuningen, who kept some objects for himself, selling the remainder through Kurt Bachstitz. [3] According to information on file at the RKD, the Hague (as above, n. 1). [4] With the Anschluss, or annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany in March, 1938, the possessions of Oscar and Elisabeth Bondy were seized and expropriated almost immediately by Nazi forces. This object is listed in a Nazi-generated inventory of his collection (July 4, 1938; Vienna, BDA-Archiv, Restitutions-Materialen, K 8/1), O.B. 1127: "Hl. Michael mit Wage, Steinskulptur, Kalkstein, Flügel fehlen, deutsch ? um 1300. H = 90." The Führermuseum, the art museum Adolf Hitler planned to build in Linz, Austria, was given right of first refusal over the confiscated collection. This sculpture was selected for inclusion. [5] Many works of art stored elsewhere by the Nazis were moved to the abandoned salt mines of Alt Aussee in Austria, to be kept safe from wartime bombing. Allied troops recovered the artwork at the end of World War II and established collecting points where the art could be identified for restitution to its rightful owners. This sculpture came to the Munich Central Collecting Point in 1945 from Alt Aussee (no. 1803) and was numbered 2459. The Munich Central Collecting Point inventory card is held by the National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland (Property Card 2459, National Archives Record Group 260, Box 501; and National Archives Record Group 260, Entry USACA-USFA; File Rep & Rest. Box 158). [6] Mr. Bondy and his wife left Europe and emigrated to the United States, where he passed away in 1944. In the years following World War II, much of his collection was restituted to his widow and subsequently sold on the New York art market, particularly through Blumka Gallery. For further on Oscar Bondy, see Sophie Lillie, Was einmal war: Handbuch der enteigneten Kunstsammlungen Wiens (Vienna, 2003), pp. 216-245.

    Credit Line

    Harriet Otis Cruft Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 90.8 x 31.7 x 19cm (35 3/4 x 12 1/2 x 7 1/2in.)

    Accession Number

    49.48

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intrasparite, with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Sleeping Saint John

    German (Bavaria)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1450
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany, Bavaria

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1962, Dr. Kurt Rossacher (b. 1918 - d. 1988), Salzburg, Austria; 1962, sold by Rossacher to the MFA for $1,000. (Accession date: November 14, 1962)

    Credit Line

    H. E. Bolles Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    35.6 x 34.9 x 33.0 cm (14 x 13 3/4 x 13 in.)

    Accession Number

    62.983

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta with polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Christ Child

    German (Upper Rhine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1430
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany, Alsace

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1921, Harry Fuld (b. 1879 - d. 1932), Frankfurt [see note 1]; by inheritance to his widow, Ida Maria Felsmann Fuld (b. 1884 - d. 1975), Frankfurt and London; consigned by Mrs. Fuld, through Wilhelm Henrich, Frankfurt, to Rosenberg and Stiebel, New York; 1970, sold by Rosenberg and Stiebel to the MFA [see note 2]. (Accession Date: January 14, 1970) NOTES: [1] It was first published by Georg Swarzenski, "Deutsche Alabasterplastik des 15. Jahrhunderts," Städel-Jahrbuch 1 (1921): 195, fig. 141. [2] Hanns Swarzenski of the MFA recommended the sculpture for purchase (January 14, 1970), writing: "Mrs. Fuld recently gave the figure on commission to Saemy Rosenberg in New York."

    Credit Line

    Harriet Otis Cruft Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    21.9 x 11.43 x 6.0 cm (8 5/8 x 4 1/2 x 2 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1970.10

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; polychrome alabaster

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Hebe and the Eagle of Jupiter

    French
    after 1857
    After François Rude (French, 1784–1855)

    Description

    Bronze with fine dark brown patina. Hebe holds cup above eagle (Jupiter) in right arm, holds back wing on eagle in left. Drapery falls from left arm over left knee. Eagle stands in back of Hebe enclosing her with wings. Figures stand on modified rockwork base. Signed: Rude; Foundry Mark: Thiebaut Freres/Fumiere at Gavignot.

    Provenance

    1984, Anthony Roth, London; 1984, sold by Anthony Roth to the MFA. (Accession Date: October 24, 1984).

    Credit Line

    Curator's Fund, Department of European Decorative Arts and Sculpture and Gift of Randolph J. Fuller

    Details

    Dimensions

    78 cm (30 11/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    1984.527

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze

    Not On View

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    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Head of Frederic II of Hohenstaufen (?)

    Italian (Capua?)
    Medieval
    about 1230 (?)
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Capua, Italy

    Description

    Provenance

    Said to have come from a private collection, Switzerland [see note 1]. By 1971, Benjamin Rowland, Jr., Cambridge, MA and Brooklin, ME; 1974, bequest of Benjamin Rowland, Jr. to the MFA. (Accession Date: February 13, 1974) NOTES: [1] According to Benjamin Rowland, "A New Portrait Head of Frederick II Hohenstaufen," Pantheon 31, no. 4 (1973), p. 351, this head "was for many years in a private collection in Switzerland and, according to the last owner, was found in Campania in the vicinity of Naples long before the discovery of the known portraits of Frederick [II]." This account has never been verified.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Benjamin Rowland, Jr.

    Details

    Dimensions

    41.9 x 23.5 x 22.2 cm (16 1/2 x 9 1/4 x 8 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1974.132

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Crucifix

    Austrian
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1515
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Austria

    Description

    Corpus with three rays.

    Provenance

    Until about mid-20th century, a chapel near the parish church of Freinberg, Austria [see note 1]. Unknown collector or dealer [see note 2]. By 1971, Hofgalerie, Vienna; 1972, sold by the Hofgalerie to the MFA. (Accession Date: October 11, 1972) NOTES: [1] According to a note provided by Wolfgang Hofstätter of the Hofgalerie to Hanns Swarzenski of the MFA (undated). The chapel is said to have been torn down "several decades ago." The note hypothesizes that the sculpture originally came from either the Freinberg church, the nearby church at Esternberg, or Passau. [2] According to the note provided by Hofstätter (see above, n. 1), after the chapel was torn down, the sculpture was purchased by its previous owner.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    197.8 x 200.0 x 44.5 cm (77 7/8 x 78 3/4 x 17 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1972.916.1

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Spirit of Antiquity

    1927
    Ossip Zadkine (Russian (active in Paris from 1909), 1890–1967)

    Description

    Stone and glass in 5 pieces. Fluted column segment in white stone. Stone scroll with simulated writing; rough stone head with curly hair; glass rectangle with painted column against blue background. Supporting marble rectangle signed Zadkine.


    Born in Belarus, Zadkine went to art school in Britain and spent most of his career in France. Upon arriving in Paris in 1909 he immediately fell in with the intellectual and artistic circle that gave birth to Cubism, forging links that remained with the artist for the rest of his career. In the mid 1920s, as much of the French art world wrestled with the legacy of classicism and its relationship to the modern world, Zadkine produced this very modern, collage-like sculpture in homage to antiquity.

    Signed

    signed Zadkine on marble platform on which head rests

    Provenance

    By 1971, Margarett Williams Sargent McKean (b. 1892 - d. 1978), Boston; 1973, gift of Margarett Williams Sargent McKean to the MFA. (Accession date: February 14, 1973)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Margarett Sargent McKean

    Copyright

    © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (column): 30.5 x 31.6 cm (12 x 12 7/16 in.) Overall (scroll): 26.7 x 37.5 cm (10 1/2 x 14 3/4 in.) Overall (head): 44.5 cm (17 1/2 in.) Overall (painted glass): 53 x 40 cm (20 7/8 x 15 3/4 in.) Overall (marble): 45.7 x 50.2 cm (18 x 19 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1973.140

    Medium or Technique

    Stone, painted glass, plaster, marble

    Not On View

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    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • La Colomba

    Italian (Venice)
    1964 (?)
    Designed by Jean (Hans) Arp (German, worked in France and Switzerland, 1886–1966), Made by Egidio Costantini (Italian), Made at La Fucina degli Angeli

    Object Place: Europe, Murano, Italy

    Description

    The form based on Arp’s bronze sculpture ‘Dream Amphora’ , c. 1941.

    Provenance

    1967, gift of Peggy Guggenheim (b. 1898 - d. 1979), Venice, to the MFA. (Accession Date: October 11, 1967)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Peggy Guggenheim

    Copyright

    © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 26.4 cm (10 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    67.949

    Medium or Technique

    Glass; blown and hand formed

    Out on Loan

    On display at Sagawa Art Museum, Shiga, June 25, 2016 – August 28, 2016

    Collections

    Contemporary Art, Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Saint Sebastian

    German (Munich)
    about 1760

    Object Place: Europe, Munich, Germany

    Description

    Silver-lustred and gilded wood. Moustached face; bound on gilded tree on rectangular base. Left leg raised, toes of overhanging right foot broken.

    Provenance

    Art dealer, Munich; sold by art dealer to Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Brookline, Ma [see note 1]; 1963, bequest of Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) Notes: [1] According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of Thannhauser's collection (February 14, 1962), Thannhauser bought the sculpture from a dealer in Munich.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    57.79 cm (22 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.596

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; Silver lustered wood

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Immaculate Virgin

    Austrian
    late 18th century

    Object Place: Europe, Austria

    Description

    Polychromed wood. On blue globe on separate original base with carved shells and scrolls. Arms outstretched, forefingers broken. Red-flowered white dress and golden blue-lined mantle at back. Paint badly flaked.

    Provenance

    By 1962, Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfired J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife, Franziska Reiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    49.53 cm (19 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.595a-b

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; Polychrome wood

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Bearded Prophet or Apostle

    Italian (Pisa?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    mid-14th century
    Follower of Giovanni Pisano (Italian (Tuscany), about 1245/50–1319)

    Object Place: Europe, Italy, Tuscany

    Description

    Provenance

    Private collection, France (?) [see note 1]. 1963, Mario Barsanti, Rome; 1963, sold by Barsanti to the MFA for $26,000. (Accession Date: December 11, 1963) NOTES: [1] According to information provided by Barsanti at the time of the sculpture's acquisition, it had been in a private collection on the French Riviera.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    137.8 x 31.8 x 24.8 cm (54 1/4 x 12 1/2 x 9 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.2665

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • La Guerre et La Paix: La Guerre

    War and Peace: War

    1901
    Paul Gauguin (French, 1848–1903)

    Object Place: Oceania, Tahiti

    Description

    Pair to 63.2765, “La Guerre et la Paix: La Guerre”


    This panel, one of a pair with 63.2765, incorporating motifs from classical reliefs and from the Javanese Buddhist sanctuary Borobudur, was among the last sculptures Gauguin carved in Tahiti. These two panels, from very late in the artist’s career, were commissioned by Gustave Fayet, an important early French collector of Gauguin’s art.

    Inscription

    Carved in relief at top center: "La Guerre et La Paix"; at bottom right: "PGO [in script]"

    Provenance

    1901, sent by the artist in Tahiti to Gustave Fayet (b. 1865 - d. 1925), Béziers, France [see note 1]; to Fayet's uncle, Léon Fayet, Arles. By 1961, Mr. and Mrs. Laurence K. Marshall, Cambridge, MA; 1963, gift of Laurence K. and Lorna J. Marshall to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 30, 1963) NOTES: [1] Gauguin executed the reliefs War and Peace (La Guerre et La Paix; MFA accession nos. 63.2764 - 63.2765) for the collector Gustave Fayet in 1901. This is discussed in a series of letters between Daniel de Monfried and Gauguin written in 1901. See Christopher Gray, Sculpture and Ceramics of Paul Gauguin (New York, 1980), pp. 73, 272-273 (with further bibliography).

    Credit Line

    Gift of Laurence K. and Lorna J. Marshall

    Details

    Dimensions

    44.45 x 99.53 cm (17 1/2 x 39 3/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.2764

    Medium or Technique

    Painted tamanu wood

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Walking Woman

    Femme qui marche

    Modeled 1933–34; cast in 1955
    Alberto Giacometti (Swiss (worked in France), 1901–1966), Cast by Fiorini's Foundry, London (English)

    Object Place: Europe, Paris, France

    Description

    Slim, almost flat, headless and armless with elongated legs, left foot slightly forward, on rectangular base with beveled sides.


    The formal and elongated, almost abstract, walking pose of this bronze reflects Giacometti’s interest in traditional African art, as well as his fascination with ancient Egyptian sculpture. This work is one of Giacometti’s earliest explorations of the walking figure, a central theme in his later sculptures. Born in the Italian part of Switzerland, Giacometti moved to Paris in 1922, where he kept a studio for the rest of his life.

    Signed

    Signature of Giacometti incised at right side.

    Markings

    Number IV/IV at back.

    Provenance

    1955, Hanover Gallery, London [see note 1]; 1964, sold by Hanover Gallery to the MFA. (Accession Date: April 8, 1964) NOTES: [1] In 1936, the plaster original of the Femme Qui Marche was sold to Sir Roland Penrose, London, who sold it to Valerie Cooper, London. In 1955, Valerie Cooper sold the plaster original to the Hanover Gallery, London, which commissioned an edition of 4 bronze casts from Fiorini's Foundry, London. The MFA's piece is marked as the fourth cast in this edition. See Ronald Alley, "Catalogue of the Tate Gallery's Collection of Modern Art" (London, 1981), p. 277 (cat. no. T.1519).

    Credit Line

    Major Henry Lee Higginson and William Francis Warden Funds

    Copyright

    © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. Licensed by VAGA, New York.

    Details

    Dimensions

    151 x 11.25 x 38.1 cm (59 7/16 x 4 7/16 x 15 in.)

    Accession Number

    64.520

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze

    On View

    Charlotte F. and Irving W. Rabb Gallery (Gallery 155)

    Collections

    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • La Guerre et La Paix: La Paix

    War and Peace: Peace

    1901
    Paul Gauguin (French, 1848–1903)

    Object Place: Oceania, Tahiti

    Description

    Pair to 63.2765, “La Guerre et la Paix: La Paix”


    This panel, one of a pair with 63.2764, incorporating motifs from classical reliefs and from the Javanese Buddhist sanctuary Borobudur, was among the last sculptures Gauguin carved in Tahiti. These two panels, from very late in the artist’s career, were commissioned by Gustave Fayet, an important early French collector of Gauguin’s art.

    Provenance

    1901, sent by the artist in Tahiti to Gustave Fayet (b. 1865 - d. 1925), Béziers, France [see note 1]; to Fayet's uncle, Léon Fayet, Arles. By 1961, Mr. and Mrs. Laurence K. Marshall, Cambridge, MA; 1963, gift of Laurence K. and Lorna J. Marshall to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 30, 1963) NOTES: [1] Gauguin executed the reliefs War and Peace (La Guerre et La Paix; MFA accession nos. 63.2764 - 63.2765) for the collector Gustave Fayet in 1901. This is discussed in a series of letters between Daniel de Monfried and Gauguin written in 1901. See Christopher Gray, Sculpture and Ceramics of Paul Gauguin (New York, 1980), pp. 73, 272-273 (with further bibliography).

    Credit Line

    Gift of Laurence K. and Lorna J. Marshall

    Details

    Dimensions

    48.26 x 99.69 cm (19 x 39 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.2765

    Medium or Technique

    Painted tamanu wood

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Virgin and Child

    South German (Franconia?)
    about 1500
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    from Processional Staff. Polychromed wood. Half length Virgin, crowned, on crescent; reclining Child (nose broken) holds lettered open book. Dress red-ground blue.

    Provenance

    Art dealer Seligsberger, Wurzburg, Germany; sold by Seligsberger to Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Brookline, Ma [see note 1]; 1963, bequest of Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) Notes: [1] According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of Thannhauser's collection (February 14, 1962).

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    26.67 cm (10 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.594

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; Polychrome wood

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Saint John from a Crucifixion Group

    Austrian (Tyrol)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1300
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    Probably before 1935, acquired in Freiburg, Germany by Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased from a dealer in Freiburg.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    72.39 x 20.0 x 12.4 cm (28 1/2 x 7 7/8 x 4 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.593

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Female Saint, Saint Barbara (?)

    German
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1520
    Circle Of Hans Leinberger (German, 15th about)

    Object Place: Europe, Landshut, Lower Bavaria, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    Probably before 1935, acquired in Munich by Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA [see note 1]; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased in Munich.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    109.22 x 40.0 x 27.9 cm (43 x 15 3/4 x 11 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.588

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Christ or Apostle

    German (Lower Swabia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1490
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    Probably before 1935, Detlinger, Freiburg, Germany [see note 1]; sold by Detlinger to Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased from Detlinger, Freiburg-im-Breisgau.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    88.9 x 26.0 x 20.0 cm (35 x 10 1/4 x 7 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.587

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Saint Sebastian

    German (Upper Rhine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1470
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany, Upper Rhine

    Description

    Saint Sebastian was an early Christian martyr tortured at the order of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Because Sebastian was shot with arrows but survived, he was later invoked as a protector against plague. In this sculpture, which once decorated an altar, Sebastian is represented in an almost dance-like pose. His placid expression as he confronts pain and suffering would have offered comfort and hope. The arrows that once pierced his flesh are now missing.

    Provenance

    Art market, Molsheim, France; by 1934, acquired in Molsheim by Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Freiburg, Munich and Brookline, MA [see note 1]; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] The sculpture was certainly in Dr. Thannhauser's possession by 1934, when he lent it to the exhibition "Mittelalterliche Plastik" (Kunsthalle, Basel, February - April, 1934), cat. no. 55. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased from a dealer in Molsheim, Alsace. Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    99.69 x 41.9 x 29.8 cm (39 1/4 x 16 1/2 x 11 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.589

    Medium or Technique

    Polychrome wood

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Pietà

    German (Upper Rhine or Swabia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1375–90
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany, Upper Rhine

    Description

    Provenance

    A chapel in Glottertal (near Freiburg), Germany (?). Before 1935, Professor Geiges (possibly Fritz Geiges, b. 1853 - d. 1935), Freiburg, Germany [see note 1]; sold by Geiges to Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased from Professor Geiges in Freiburg, and came from "the chapel in Glottertal."

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    88.9 x 34.9 x 24.8 cm (35 x 13 3/4 x 9 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.590

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Flying Angel

    German (Lower Bavaria)
    1530–40
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Lower Bavaria, Germany

    Description

    Flying Angel (no wings) from Gethsemane Group. Polychromed wood, Holds Chalice in both hands. Flower fillet on curly hair, belted red overblouse, swirling blue skirts, bare feet. Paint flaking. Iron loop at back for stand to velvet block.

    Provenance

    By 1962, Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    44.45 cm (17 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.592

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; Polychrome wood

    Not On View

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  • Saint Barbara

    German (Swabia)
    Medieval
    about 1440
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Swabia, Germany

    Description

    Polychromed wood, hollow back. Half figure, mantle gold, dress gold and traces of blue, holds tower (white with red and blue roof tiles) in right, left arm gone. Hair on left side cut off, small cap.

    Provenance

    Albert Figdor (b. 1843 - d. 1927), Vienna; September 29 - 30, 1930, posthumous Figdor sale, Cassirer, Berlin, lot 200, sold for M 850 [see note 1]. Possibly Oscar Bondy (b. 1870 - d. 1944), Vienna and New York. Siegfried Kramarsky (d. 1961), Amsterdam and New York [see note 2]. 1963, Siegfried J. Thannhauser, Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Dr. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] There is a Figdor collection label on the back of the sculpture (F 2641). This is probably the German half-length sculpture of Saint Barbara, about 1460-1470, described in the Figdor auction catalogue; see "Sammlung Dr. Albert Figdor, Wien" (Berlin, 1930), vol. 4, lot 200. The description of this sculpture matches the MFA object, except that the saint is said to wear a diadem on her forehead -- an examination of the sculpture suggests that this may once have been true for the MFA object -- and damage is described on the right side of her hairstyle, not her left; this may be a simple error. [2] That the sculpture belonged to Bondy and Kramarsky is information taken from Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of Dr. Thannhauser's collection (February 14, 1962; in MFA curatorial file). Attempts to identify this sculpture in inventories of Oscar Bondy's collection have not been successful.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    Height 40 cm (15 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.591

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; Polychromed fruitwood

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  • Virgin and Child on the Crescent Moon

    Austrian
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1440–50
    Unidentified artist

    Place of Origin: Austria

    Description

    The swaying curve of the body of the Virgin, animated by deeply carved rhythmic folds, gives to this sculpture a sense of lyricism and weightiness characteristic of later Gothic sculpture in Northern Europe. The sweetness of expression of both mother and child makes the sculpture extremely vivid and appealing to the viewer. Wearing a crown and standing upon the crescent moon with a face below, this warmly human image also has symbolic meanings, associating the Virgin with the biblical Woman of the Apocalypse.

    Provenance

    15th century until 1797, parish church of Krenstetten, Austria [see note 1]. 1965, Wolfgang Hofstätter, Vienna; 1965, sold by Wolfgang Hofstätter to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 10, 1965) NOTES: [1] According to Wolfgang Hofstätter (letter to Hanns Swarzenski, MFA, September 23, 1965), this was the central sculpture of an altarpiece at the parish church of Krenstetten. When the church burned in 1797, the Madonna was salvaged and removed to a nearby building, where it was rediscovered after World War II.

    Credit Line

    Centennial Purchase Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    176.5 x 55.9 x 30.5 cm (69 1/2 x 22 x 12 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.1354

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; poplar with polychromy

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Bust of Cleopatra

    Italian (Mantua)
    Renaissance
    about 1519–22
    Pier Jacopo Alari Bonacolsi (Italian, about 1460–1528)

    Description

    Patinated black surface (with bronze shining through), and traces of gilding. Life-size bust with head turned and bent, eyes downcast, Classical face, wavy hair. Crown and serpent on base identify it as Cleopatra. Diadem, two buttons at top of gown.


    This bust is identified as Cleopatra, ancient queen of Egypt, by her crown and by the small serpent that decorates the base. Once Cleopatra lost all hope of regaining control of Egypt from the Romans, she is believed to have committed suicide by the poisonous bite of a snake. The bust reflects an ancient Roman prototype and was made by an artist whose nickname, Antico, resulted from his exceptional skill in such ancient techniques as bronze casting. The bust probably belonged to Isabella d’Este, Marchioness of Mantua.

    Provenance

    By 1626, probably in the collection of Ferdinando Gonzaga (b. 1587 - d. 1626), Mantua [see note 1]. Said to have been acquired either in Belgium or in England by Julius Goldschmidt (b. 1882 - d. 1964), London [see note 2]; 1964, sold by the estate of Julius Goldschmidt to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 9, 1964) NOTES: [1] This sculpture has been associated with a bronze bust of "a woman with two crowns" (perhaps referring to the double crown in the present bust) included in the inventory of the estate of Ferdinando Gonzaga in 1627 (see Detlef Heikamp, L'Antico, Milan 1966, pl. XV). This has led to the hypothesis that it was one of several "bronze heads" that Antico wrote about to Isabella d'Este (b. 1474 - d. 1539) in 1519. However, this has not been proven. See, for example, Ann Hersey Allison, “L’Antico e i fratelli Lombardo: relazioni tra Venezia e le corti di Mantova e Ferrara, circa 1490-1530,” in L’industria artistica del Bronzo del Rinascimento a Venezia e nell’Italia Settentrionale, ed. Matteo Ceriana and Victoria Avery (2007), pp. 123-126. [2] That the bust was discovered in Belgium is according to notes in the MFA curatorial file, and has been published by Ann Hersey Allison, "The Bronzes of Pier Jacopo Alari-Bonacolsi, called Antico," Jahrbuch der kunsthistorischen Sammlungen in Wien 89/90 (1993-1994), p. 240. According to information provided by curator Hanns Swarzenski at the time of the sculpture's acquisition, it had been "recently discovered in England" by dealer Julius Goldschmidt.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    64.45 cm (25 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    64.2174

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze, with traces of gilding

    On View

    Italian Renaissance Gallery (Gallery 206)

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  • Panel from a Tomb

    Spanish (Catalonia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1350–70
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Part of a set with two other panels (66.385, 66.386).

    Provenance

    Possibly from a royal tomb, monastery church at Poblet, near Barcelona, Spain (original commission) [see note 1]. By 1923, Jacques Seligmann et Fils, Paris; April 20, 1926, sold by Seligmann to Myron C. Taylor (b. 1874 - d. 1959), New York; November 11-12, 1960, Taylor estate sale, Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, lot 898. Possibly with Blumka Gallery, New York [see note 2]. By 1966, Jack Linsky (b. 1897 - d. 1980), New York; 1966, gift of Jack Linsky to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 1, 1966) NOTES: [1] Mildred Stapley Byne wrote about the reliefs to Seligmann (November 23, 1923): "I should say that your frieze was the side slab of one of the royal tombs in Poblet, as the few which remain in the transept and nave of the church are very similar." The letter indicates Mrs. Byne's familiarity with the pieces, but does not suggest the name of a previous owner. When they were accessioned in 1966, the reliefs were believed to have come from the tomb of Pedro VI de Queralt in the sanctuary of Belloch de Santa Coloma de Queralt. [2] Blumka was consulted about the reliefs when they were acquired and appraised them. It is not clear whether the gallery had owned them, or was simply called in for advice.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Jack Linsky

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.0 x 46.0 x 6.7 cm (28 3/4 x 18 1/8 x 2 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    66.384

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster, blue glass, and parcel gilding

    Not On View

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  • Annette

    1953
    Alberto Giacometti (Swiss (worked in France), 1901–1966)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Standing female nude on cubic base.

    Signed

    Signed Alberto Giacometti - 2/6-1953

    Markings

    Numbered 2/6

    Provenance

    1966, gift of Heyward Cutting, Cambridge, MA, to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 1, 1966)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Heyward Cutting

    Copyright

    © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. Licensed by VAGA, New York.

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 58.4 x 15 x 11 cm (23 x 5 7/8 x 4 5/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    66.383

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze

    Not On View

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  • Portrait Bust of a Man

    French
    1786
    Jean-Antoine Houdon (French, 1741–1828)

    Description

    In a bust half life-size a man of about fifty is portrayed looking ahead and slightly to his left. He wears a wig with two long horizontal curls over each ear and the rest of the hair pulled back and tied at the nape of his neck with a bow. His eyes, which have a lively, amused expression, are deeply cut with a small circle of marble left just under the lid to indicate the irises. The mouth is tightly closed with the beginning of a smile expressed at the corners. The flesh on the cheeks and neck is loose, the soft folds protruding slightly over his high, finely pleated stock. A double-edged ruffled jabot and a plain vest are worn under a simply cut coat of a heavy material with a wide notched collar. The semicircular truncation of the bust cuts through the sitter’s upper arms and mid-torso.

    Inscription

    Signed and dated on back of truncation: houdon,f.1786.

    Provenance

    1925, La Bouillerie, Crosmière, Sarthe, France; December 4, 1925, La Bouillerie sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, lot 17 bis [see note 1]. David David-Weill (b. 1871 - d. 1952), Paris and Neuilly-sur-Seine, France; 1937, sold by David-Weill to Wildenstein and Company, New York [see note 3]; October 28, 1943, sold by Wildenstein to Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876 - d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1965) NOTES: [1] Sold as "Petit buste ... représentant Monsieur de Biré ... Appartient à N. de X...". See "The Forsyth Wickes Collection" (Boston, 1972), p. 157, cat. no. 104. [2] See "Sale of the David-Weill Collection," Art News, February 27, 1937, pp. 12, 20.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 34.9 x 27.9 cm (13 3/4 x 11 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2203

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; white marble with separate white marble socle

    Not On View

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  • Panel from a Tomb

    Spanish (Catalonia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1350–70
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Part of a set with two other panels (66.384, 66.386).

    Provenance

    Possibly from a royal tomb, monastery church at Poblet, near Barcelona, Spain (original commission) [see note 1]. By 1923, Jacques Seligmann et Fils, Paris; April 20, 1926, sold by Seligmann to Myron C. Taylor (b. 1874 - d. 1959), New York; November 11-12, 1960, Taylor estate sale, Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, lot 898. Possibly with Blumka Gallery, New York [see note 2]. By 1966, Jack Linsky (b. 1897 - d. 1980), New York; 1966, gift of Jack Linsky to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 1, 1966) NOTES: [1] Mildred Stapley Byne wrote about the reliefs to Seligmann (November 23, 1923): "I should say that your frieze was the side slab of one of the royal tombs in Poblet, as the few which remain in the transept and nave of the church are very similar." The letter indicates Mrs. Byne's familiarity with the pieces, but does not suggest the name of a previous owner. When they were accessioned in 1966, the reliefs were believed to have come from the tomb of Pedro VI de Queralt in the sanctuary of Belloch de Santa Coloma de Queralt. [2] Blumka was consulted about the reliefs when they were acquired and appraised them. It is not clear whether the gallery had owned them, or was simply called in for advice.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Jack Linsky

    Details

    Dimensions

    56.5 x 32.4 x 6.4 cm (22 1/4 x 12 3/4 x 2 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    66.385

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster, blue glass, and parcel gilding

    Not On View

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  • Panel from a Tomb

    Spanish (Catalonia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1350–70
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Part of a set with two other panels (66.384, 66.385).

    Provenance

    Possibly from a royal tomb, monastery church at Poblet, near Barcelona, Spain (original commission) [see note 1]. By 1923, Jacques Seligmann et Fils, Paris; April 20, 1926, sold by Seligmann to Myron C. Taylor (b. 1874 - d. 1959), New York; November 11-12, 1960, Taylor estate sale, Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, lot 898. Possibly with Blumka Gallery, New York [see note 2]. By 1966, Jack Linsky (b. 1897 - d. 1980), New York; 1966, gift of Jack Linsky to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 1, 1966) NOTES: [1] Mildred Stapley Byne wrote about the reliefs to Seligmann (November 23, 1923): "I should say that your frieze was the side slab of one of the royal tombs in Poblet, as the few which remain in the transept and nave of the church are very similar." The letter indicates Mrs. Byne's familiarity with the pieces, but does not suggest the name of a previous owner. When they were accessioned in 1966, the reliefs were believed to have come from the tomb of Pedro VI de Queralt in the sanctuary of Belloch de Santa Coloma de Queralt. [2] Blumka was consulted about the reliefs when they were acquired and appraised them. It is not clear whether the gallery had owned them, or was simply called in for advice.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Jack Linsky

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.66 x 104.14 cm (29 x 41 in.)

    Accession Number

    66.386

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster, blue glass and parcel gilding

    Not On View

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  • Saint John

    Spanish (Old Castille, Burgos?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1280–90
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Italy

    Description

    Provenance

    Private collection, Chateau d'Arbus, near Pau, France [see note 1]. Art market, France (?) [see note 2]. Possibly with Neumeister, Munich; possibly sold by Neumeister to the Hofgalerie, Vienna; 1967, sold by the Hofgalerie to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 13, 1967) NOTES: [1] According to a letter from Wolfgang Hofstätter, Hofgalerie, to Hanns Swarzenski of the MFA (December 18, 1967). [2] Notes in the curatorial file (October, 1982) indicate that Hanns Swarzenski recalled that the Hofgalerie had acquired this sculpture from Neumeister, Munich; before then it had been with an unknown French dealer. This has not been verified. Wolfgang Hofstätter first mentioned the sculpture in correspondence to the MFA on October 7, 1966.

    Credit Line

    Centennial Purchase Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    162.6 x 45.1 x 34.3 cm (64 x 17 3/4 x 13 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    67.767

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Pleurant

    French (Rhône Valley)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1475–1500
    Unidentified artist, French (French)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    This figure of a monk covers his face in grief, his heavy drapery conveying the weight of his sorrow. Large sculptures of mourners decorated tombs, creating a kind of perpetual funeral procession accompanying the effigy of the deceased. This small figure may also have been part of a tomb ensemble or, more likely, was a private, commemorative work.

    Provenance

    By 1931, Bela Hein (b. 1883 - d. 1931), Paris [see note 1]; by inheritance to Mme. Bela Hein, Paris; 1967, sold by Mme. Bela Hein to the MFA. (Accession Date: Sept 13, 1967) NOTES: [1] According to a September 8, 1967 acquisition recommendation from Hanns Swarzenski, Hein acquired the sculpture in Avignon.

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    23.2 x 12.2 x 11.1 cm (9 1/8 x 4 13/16 x 4 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    67.764

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone with traces of yellow bole and polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Mermaid Astride a Sea Monster

    South German (?)
    late 16th–early 17th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    A nude female figure sits astride the back of a monster. Her legs terminate in two sinuous fish tales that extend under and behind her. She looks down to her left over her left shoulder and holds her left hand under her right breast. In her right hand she carries what appears to be a bunch of seaweed. Her hair is drawn up in a knotted braid at the crown of her head, and she wears a semicircular diadem in her hair. Her arms and hands seem disproportionately large in scale compared to her head and upper torso. The monster’s head emerges between the female figure’s legs. He has pointed ears, tufts of hair on his head and face, and a stylized beard. He has bushy eyebrows and an enormous open mouth with large squared teeth, thick lips, and a tongue visible. His two legs are parallel to the ground and have cloven hooves. The cast is extremely heavy and crude with very little cold work in the bronze after casting. It is open from the middle of the mermaid’s back to the area behind her legs and the monster’ s head. The back of the group is hollowed out as though it were meant to serve as a support for a candelabra or a fountain.

    Markings

    painted in black on inside of cavity at the back: Br.26

    Provenance

    Until 1884, Joseph Fau collection; March 3-8, 1884, posthumous Joseph Fau sale, Hotel Drouot, Paris, lot 306, to M. Bourgeois, Cologne [see note 1]. Frédéric Spitzer (b. 1815 - d. 1890), Paris; from Spitzer to Oscar Hainauer (d. 1894), Berlin [see note 2]; by descent to his widow, Julie Hainauer, Berlin [see note 3]. By 1912, Eugen Gutmann (b. 1840 - d. 1925), Berlin [see note 4]. By 1934, Fritz Mannheimer (b. 1890 - d. 1939), Amsterdam [see note 5]; 1934, transferred to the Artistic and General Securities Company, Ltd., for Mendelssohn and Co. bank [see note 6]; 1941, sold by the creditors of Mendelssohn bank to Hans Posse for Adolf Hitler [see note 7]; taken to Hohenfurth [see note 8]; June 20, 1945, shipped by Allied forces to the Munich Central Collecting Point (no. 283/10) [see note 9]; March 29, 1946, returned to the Netherlands [see note 10]; October 15, 1952, Mannheimer sale, Frederik Muller, Amsterdam, lot 96, to Herbert Bier, London, and Rosenberg and Stiebel, New York; January 12, 1953, Bier's share sold to Rosenberg and Stiebel; March 23, 1953, sold by Rosenberg and Stiebel to Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876 - d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1965) NOTES: [1] The name of the buyer is annotated in a copy of the auction catalogue (reproduction in MFA curatorial file). The sculpture was attributed in the catalogue to an Italian artist of the 16th century. [2] After Mr. Hainauer's death, his widow had the collection catalogued and published; see Wilhelm von Bode "Die Sammlung Oscar Hainauer" (Berlin, 1897), pp. 22, 77, cat. no. 108 (Br. 26), ill. on p. 20. The sculpture is attributed in the catalogue to an Italian artist and dated about 1550. It is said to have come from the Spitzer collection, although it was not included in Frédéric Spitzer's posthumous sale of 1893. [3] She lent it to the "Ausstellung von Kunstwerken des Mittelalters und der Renaissance aus Berliner Privatbesitz veranstaltet von der kunstgeschichtlichen Gesellschaft" exh. cat. (Berlin, May 20 - July 3, 1898) pl. xxxi, no. 10. [4] See Otto von Falke, "Die Kunstsammlung Eugen Gutmann" (Berlin, 1912), p. 60, cat. no. 174, pl. 46. Attributed to Giovanni da Bologna. [5] He lent it to the exhibition "Italiaansche kunst in nederlandsch bezit," Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, July 1 - October 1, 1934, cat. no. 914. Mannheimer owned several objects from the Gutmann collection, though how and when he acquired them is not known. [6] In 1934 Mannheimer's entire art collection was transferred to the Artistic and General Securities Company, Ltd., for Mendelssohn bank, to which he owed a considerable debt, and the bank lent the collection back to Mannheimer. Since he continued to collect works of art, the debt against him grew significantly until 1939, the year of his death. [7] Due to its own financial difficulties, Mendelssohn bank closed its doors in 1939. Mannheimer's estate was to be sold to pay the debts owed the Dutch state. On the sale to Hitler, see Lynn H. Nicholas, "The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe's Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War" (New York: Knopf, 1994), 111-114. [8] The Nazi regime maintained a depository for works of art at Hohenfurth. [9] Munich Central Collecting Point inventory card (Property Card 283, Hohenfurth 15/10; National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, MD, RG 260, Microfilm M1946). [10] Following World War II, art objects that had been sold to the Nazi agency were considered confiscated property and were restituted to their countries of origin for return to their former owners. However, objects from the Mannheimer collection had been sold to benefit the Dutch state, that is, to settle the debts of Mendelssohn bank. For this reason they were not returned to Fritz Mannheimer's widow, but were sold at auction for the profit of the Dutch state. See Nicholas (as above, n. 7), p. 422. Both the Artistic General Securities Company, Ltd., and the curator of the Mannheimer collection, who represented the creditors of the bank, agreed not to make claims for the restitution of rights to the works of art.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    33.1 cm (13 1/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2228

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; bronze with reddish black patina

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  • Figure of a Female Saint

    Southern Netherlandish (Malines)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1510–
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    This doll-like figure was set into a garden tableau, probably made for a convent. The saint’s sweet features, graceful posture, and rhythmically flowing drapery are highlighted by paint and gilding, some of which is original-a rare survival.

    Markings

    Carved in middle back of figure: \II\; circular stamp in black on bottom of base inscribed: DOUANES PAYS BAS (center of inscription illegible); adhesive sticker inscribed: 12263.1/Wickes.

    Provenance

    About 1950s, H. Blairman and Sons, London; sold by Blairman to Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876 - d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI [see note 1]; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1965) NOTES: [1] The exact date that Mr. Wickes purchased the sculpture is not known. According to a letter from George Levy of H. Blairman and Sons to the MFA (June 5, 1990), it may have been in the 1950s.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 37 x 12 x 7.5 cm (14 9/16 x 4 3/4 x 2 15/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2230

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy and gilding; some later painting, gilding and varnish

    Not On View

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  • Two Dancing Bacchantes and a Putto

    French
    1800
    Claude Michel, called Clodion (French, 1738–1814)

    Object Place: Europe, Paris, France

    Description

    Two young bacchantes and a putto, each poised on one foot, stand on a circular base. The central bacchante is nude except for a strap that crosses her torso diagonally and catches a finely folded drapery that falls over her left shoulder, around her back and over her right thigh, passing between her legs. Her long hair is parted in the middle, drawn up in a knot at the back of her head, with loose curls falling over her left shoulder and down her back. She holds a bunch of grapes in her right hand and her left hand is interlaced with the right hand of the second bacchante. Her weight is balanced on her right foot, with her left foot extended in a dancing position. The second bacchante seems to run forward, her weight on her right foot with her left leg extended behind her. She wears a thin chiton that is loosely attached at her left shoulder falling below her breasts where it is held by a diagonal band across her torso which also catches an animal skin at her right side. The thinly pleated long garment is open over her knees. Her hair is dressed like her companion’s except that she wears a crown of grape leaves. Her left arm extends out to her side, her right arm is raised with her hand entwined with her companion’s. The little male putto clings to the drapery at the back of the central figure with his left hand, and balancing on the toes of his left foot, kicks his right foot forward. He holds a stick with a bunch of grape leaves over his right shoulder and is nude except for a diagonal strip of leaves across his torso. In his hair he wears a crown of grape leaves. On the ground behind the central figure is a tambourine filled with grapes.


    Inspired by ancient works he would have seen in Rome, Clodion created a lively scene of a dance stimulated by wine. In classical mythology, Bacchus and his band of merry-makers inhabited the woods, and Clodion’s sylvan figures hold grapes, wear garlands of grape leaves, and carry the thyrsus (the wine-god’s magic staff). Their tambourine has fallen to the ground. The sculptor’s mastery of the terra cotta medium is evident in the contrasts between the smooth flesh of the women, the chubby rolls of fat of the infant, and the fresh, animated surfaces of the drapery, hair, and leaves.

    Inscription

    Signed and dated on back of base; incised in clay before firing: CLODION./1800

    Provenance

    Baron Gustave de Rothschild (b. 1829 - d. 1911), Paris; by descent to his daughter, Baroness Lucie de Rothschild Lambert (b. 1863 - d. 1916), Brussels; by descent to her son, Baron Henri de Lambert (b. 1887 - d. 1933), Brussels and New York [see note 1]. 1946, Rosenberg and Stiebel, New York; January 21, 1946, sold by Rosenberg and Stiebel to Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876 - d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA (Accession Date: December 24, 1965) NOTES: [1] The provenance of this object, pertaining to the Rothschild and Lambert families, is provided by the sale receipt from Rosenberg and Stiebel to Forsyth Wickes (January 21, 1946). The Rothschild family consigned many works of art to Rosenberg and Stiebel, although it has not been determined whether this object passed directly from their possession to that of the gallery.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 45cm (17 11/16 in.), diameter of base: 17 cm (6 11/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2212

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta

    Not On View

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  • Seated Female Satyr

    French
    about 1790
    Attributed to Joseph-Charles Marin (French, 1759–1834)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    A female satyr is seated on an outcropping of rock with a tree trunk at her right side across which lies a thrysus. She has goat’s legs and cloven hooves. Her right arm extends across her lower torso and with her right hand she taps a tambourine held in her left hand. She is nude except for two arm bands and a low-slung belt made of grapevine. Her breasts are high and small, her shoulders narrow. Her long wavy hair is parted in the middle and drawn up at the crown of her head. She wears a band in her hair, and loose curls fall over her shoulders. A raking tool has been used to create the textures on much of the base, and a stylus has been used to achieve the choppy effect in the hair and legs.

    Inscription

    None

    Provenance

    Rothschild collection, London [see note 1]. 1947, Wildenstein and Co., New York; September 10, 1947, sold by Wildenstein to Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876 - d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1965) NOTES: [1] This provenance was provided by Wildenstein and Co. at the time of the object's acquisition by Forsyth Wickes (September 10, 1947). Whether Wildenstein had acquired it directly from the Rothschild family is not known.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 34.4 cm (13 9/16 in.) Other (diam of self-base): 21.7 cm (8 9/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2221

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta with self-base

    Not On View

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  • Portrait bust of François de Saligna de la Motte Fénélon

    French
    second half of 18th century
    After Jean-Louis Lemoyne (1665–1755)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    After a marble bust by Jean-Louis Lemoyne for the funeral monument of Fénélon (Musée de Cambrai). The sitter looks slightly to his left. His hair falls in loose curls to the nape of his neck, the crown of his head is covered by a small round cap. He wears an ecclesiastical robe with small buttons along the center front and an attached hood folded at the back of his neck. Around his neck he wears a squared collar with a hemmed border. From under the collar and over his shoulders hangs a broad ribbon with an eight-point cross pendant on which a bird with its wings spread appears in relief. The sitter has a prominent forehead and nose with a thin, closed mouth. His eyes are large, the pupils and irises incised. The truncation is cut from the middle of the upper arms to just above the waist of the sitter.

    Inscription

    Inscribed on back of truncation in clay before firing: francois de Salignac/dela motte fenellon/archeveque de cambray

    Provenance

    By 1948, Wildenstein & Co, New York; November 24, 1948, sold by Wildenstein & Co to Forsyth Wickes, New York and Newport, RI (b. 1876 - d. 1964); 1965, bequest of Wickes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1965)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (with socle): 36 cm (14 3/16 in.) Other (without socle): 27.5 cm (10 13/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2213

    Medium or Technique

    Cast terracotta with tinted plaster repair

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  • Portrait bust of a Woman Artist

    Madame Charpentier

    French (Lyon)
    about 1810
    Joseph Chinard (1756–1813)

    Description

    A young woman is portrayed to the waist with her head turned to her right and her arms crossed under her breasts. In her right hand she holds a paint brush. On the front of the self-base a palette with brushes is depicted. She wears a thin garment with a square neckline and short sleeves that is banded at the edge of the neck and sleeves with a patterned ribbon. Her short hair is arranged in loose curls that fall over her forehead and temples.

    Signed

    Signed on front edge of self-base: chinard de'l.

    Provenance

    By 1909, Conde de Penha Longa; December 2, 1911, Penha Longa sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, lot 29. 1935, André J. Seligman, Paris; October 16, 1935, sold by Seligman to Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876 - d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1965)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 25.2 cm (9 15/16 in.) Other (self-base): 7.9 x 7.3 cm (3 1/8 x 2 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2208

    Medium or Technique

    Molded plaster

    Not On View

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  • Bust of a Woman

    French
    dated 177(4?)
    Augustin Pajou (French, 1730–1809)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    A young woman wears her long hair pulled back from her face in a roll that is held in place with a band. One long curl falls over her left shoulder, and a wide meche falls down her back. A rose and other flowers are placed in her hair at her left temple. Her features are smooth and regular with incised eyes and a cupid’s bow mouth. She wears drapery around her shoulders with a band over her right shoulder and between her breasts. The loose drapery falls over her left breast, leaving her right breast exposed.

    Inscription

    Signed and dated upper right edge of truncation, inscribed in the clay before firing: Pajou.f.177(4?)

    Provenance

    1937, David David-Weill (b. 1871 - d. 1952), Paris and Neuilly-sur-Seine, France; 1937, sold by David-Weill to Wildenstein and Company, New York [see note 1]; May 18, 1940, sold by Wildenstein to Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876 - d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI [see note 2]; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1965) NOTES: [1] See "Sale of the David-Weill Collection," Art News, February 27, 1937, pp. 12, 20. [2] Sold as a portrait of "Madame Olivier".

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (without socle): 20 x 16.8 cm (7 7/8 x 6 5/8 in.) Other (with socle): 36.8 cm (14 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2218

    Medium or Technique

    Cast terracotta with a plaster fill

    Not On View

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  • Portrait bust of Marie-Anne Botot d'Angeville

    French (Paris)
    1752
    Jean-Baptiste Defernex (1729–1783)

    Description

    The young woman looks slightly to her left. Her hair is drawn back to the crown of her head with long sausage-shaped curls falling over her shoulders, one terminating in two looped ribbons. She wears a strand of beads and a rose in her hair. Her expression is open and smiling. The pupils and irises of her eyes are incised, giving her an animated gaze. The truncation of the bust is oval and cut from the middle of each shoulder to her upper chest. Her neck is bare.

    Signed

    Signed and dated along the upper edge of the truncation, incised in the clay before firing:Mlle. Dangeville.par.J.B. Defernex1752.

    Provenance

    1937, David David-Weill (b. 1871 - d. 1952), Paris and Neuilly-sur-Seine, France; 1937, sold by David-Weill to Wildenstein and Company, New York [see note 1]; October 28, 1943, sold by Wildenstein to Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876 - d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1965) NOTES: [1] See "Sale of the David-Weill Collection," Art News, February 27, 1937, pp. 12, 20.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall (with socle): 36 cm (14 3/16 in.) Overall (without socle): 19.3 cm (7 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2219

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta

    Not On View

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  • Dante and Virgil

    French
    modeled 1861; cast 1862
    Baron Henri de Triqueti (French, 1804–1874)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Half length figures of Dante and Virgil. Modeled 1861, cast 1862.


    Triqueti, like many artists of his time, was inspired by medieval and Renaissance art and literature. He often represented the Italian poet Dante (1265-1321) or illustrated episodes from Dante’s Divine Comedy. Here, using a half-length format that recalls antique funerary statuary, he portrayed Dante with Roman poet Virgil, who guided him through Hell and Purgatory in the Divine Comedy. Dante holds a scroll inscribed with a line from Canto One of Purgatory: “Liberta va cercando ch’e si cara” (He who goes seeking freedom which is so dear).

    Inscription

    Signed and dated, back right: H. de triqueti 1861; foundry mark and date, back left: F. BARBEDIENNE, fondeur paris 1862; Inscribed on scroll (from Dante's "Purgatory," canto I): Liberta/va cercando/ch’e/si cara ("He who goes seeking freedom which is so dear")

    Provenance

    1874, upon the death of the artist, to his daughter, Mrs. Edward Lee Childe (Blanche de Triqueti, b. 1837 - d. 1886), Paris; 1876, gift of Mrs. Edward Lee Childe to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 7, 1876)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Edward Lee Childe

    Details

    Dimensions

    90 x 86 x 64 cm (35 7/16 x 33 7/8 x 25 3/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    76.5

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze

    On View

    Thomas Jefferson Coolidge III Gallery (Gallery 248)

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  • Cupid Disguised as a Shepherd Boy

    English
    about 1836
    John Gibson (British, 1790–1866)

    Place of Creation: Rome, Italy

    Description

    White marble.

    Signed

    Signed: I.GIBSON FECIT ROMÆ

    Provenance

    About 1836/1837, sold by the artist to Thomas Gold Appleton (b. 1812 - d. 1884), Boston [see note 1]; 1884, bequest of Appleton to the MFA [see note 2]. (Accession Date: April 7, 1884) NOTES: [1] This is one of eight repetitions that Gibson made of Cupid Disguised as a Shepherd Boy, a sculpture he exhibited at the Royal Academy of Arts in 1837 (no. 1169). In a letter of December 14, 1836 (National Library of Wales, MS4914D-40, kindly provided to the MFA by Eric Forster), Benjamin Gibson indicated that his brother John had made "another repetition [of Cupid Disguised as a Shepherd] in marble for an American gentleman--it is going to Boston, United States." This is, in all likelihood, a reference to the present version, which was owned by Thomas Gold Appleton. [2] From the time of purchase until it was bequeathed to the museum, the statue stood in the hall of Mr. Appleton's home on Commonwealth Avenue. See a photocopy of an undated inventory of his works of art in the file for this object. The inventory is courtesy of the Appleton Family Papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Thomas Gold Appleton

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 132.1 x 40.1 x 49.5 cm (52 x 15 13/16 x 19 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    84.271a

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    On View

    Alan and Simone Hartman Galleries (Gallery 241)

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  • Madonna and Child

    Italian (Tuscany)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    early 14th century
    Follower of Giovanni Pisano (Italian (Tuscany), about 1245/50–1319)

    Description

    Although the heads of both figures are missing, this work displays the powerful presence of fourteenth-century Italian sculpture in the skillful carving, the secure stance of the Madonna, and the graceful patterns of the drapery. The work is very similar to a Madonna and Child, now in Genoa, by Giovanni Pisano, among the foremost sculptors of this period. The small scale of the sculpture indicates that it was once either part of a larger ensemble or a private devotional image.

    Provenance

    Charles Callahan Perkins, Boston; By inheritance to Charles Callahan Perkins' wife, Mrs. C.C. (Francis D.) Perkins; 1895, gift of Mrs. C.C. Perkins (Accession Date: December 10, 1895)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. C. C. Perkins

    Details

    Dimensions

    47.62 x 14.6 x 15.87 cm (18 3/4 x 5 3/4 x 6 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    95.1383

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Saint Barbara with her Tower

    Flemish
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1450–75
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    1912, Bacri Frères, Paris; 1912, sold by Bacri Frères to the Western Art Visiting Committee for the MFA. (Accession Date: December 5, 1912)

    Credit Line

    Gift of the Western Art Visiting Committee

    Details

    Dimensions

    62.5 x 21.9 x 16.0 cm (24 5/8 x 8 5/8 x 6 5/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    12.1174

    Medium or Technique

    Wood

    Not On View

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  • Madonna of the Clouds

    Italian (Florence)
    Renaissance
    about 1425–35
    Donatello (Italian, 1386–1466)

    Object Place: Europe, Florence, Italy

    Description

    Marble. Madonna and child with angels, cherubs


    Donatello was one of the most innovative sculptors in the history of European sculpture. He carved this image in flattened relief (rilievo schiacciato), a technique, which he invented, in which a sculptor could create the illusion of volumetric forms set into deep, continuous space with the most subtle and shallow carving. The Madonna sits as if on the ground, to convey the idea of humility, but Donatello sets her in the clouds, so she also becomes Queen of Heaven. A feeling of weighty foreboding is expressed in the Madonna’s somber profile, which seems to look into the Christ Child’s tragic future.

    Provenance

    By 1902, Quincy Adams Shaw (b. 1825 - d. 1908), Boston [see note 1]; 1917, gift of Quincy Adams Shaw, through Quincy Adams Shaw Jr., and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton, to the MFA. (Accession Date: March 29, 1917) NOTES: [1] Exactly when and how Quincy Adams Shaw acquired the relief is not known. Wilhelm von Bode stated that it had been in a church in Rome; see his "Denkmäler der Renaissance-Sculptur Toscanas" (Munich, 1892-1905), text vol., p. 42. However, Georg Swarzenski ("Donatello's 'Madonna in the Clouds' and Fra Bartolommeo," Bulletin of the Museum of Fine Arts, vol. 40, no. 240, August, 1942, p. 68) casts serious doubts upon this hypothesis. It was certainly in his possession by 1902, when Bode published it, in "Florentiner Bildhauer der Renaissance" (Berlin, 1902), pp. 119-120 and p. 200, fig. 87, as in the Shaw collection.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Quincy Adams Shaw through Quincy Adams Shaw, Jr. and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton

    Details

    Dimensions

    33.1 x 32 cm (13 1/16 x 12 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.1470

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    On View

    Italian Renaissance Gallery (Gallery 206)

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  • Virgin and Child

    French (Lorraine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1310–20
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Lorraine, France

    Description

    Provenance

    Purportedly from the Church of Saint Goery in Epinal (Les Vosges), France [see note 1]. In 1789, possibly removed from the Church of Saint Goery, Epinal [see note 2]. Mr. Daguerre, Paris. [see note 3]; by 1917, sold by Mr. Daguerre to dealer, John Vigouroux, New York [see note 4]; 1919, sold by Demotte, New York, through John Vigouroux, to the MFA for $30000. (Accession Date: February 13, 1919) NOTES: [1] According to MFA Bulletin of April 1919, and curatorial exhibition notes of 1936 written by Edwin Hipkiss. [2] According to notation by John Vigoroux on the reverse of photo-certificate of March 17, 1939, in MFA files, the piece then entered the collection of one of the late Departmental Architects of Vosges, after which it was believed to have passed through the hands of several dealers. [3] Mr. Daguerre was a painter and collector from Bourdeaux who lived in the Villa de Ternes in Paris; see letter of April 14, 1939, letter from John Vigouroux, in MFA files. [4] Letter of April 14, 1939, cited above, reveals that an associate of Vigoroux in Paris bought the statue from Mr. Daguerre; it would be shipped to Vigoroux in New York in late 1917.

    Credit Line

    Hervey Edward Wetzel Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    133.35 x 49.53 x 33.02 cm (52 1/2 x 19 1/2 x 13 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.37

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intrasparite, with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Head of an Angel

    French (Rheims?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    second half of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1919, Dr. Denman W. Ross; 1919, gift of Dr. Denman W. Ross. (Accession date: September 11, 1919)

    Credit Line

    Denman Waldo Ross Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    24.1 x 26.0 x 26.7 cm (9 1/2 x 10 1/4 x 10 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.797

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone

    Not On View

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  • Acolyte

    French (Central)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    first half 15th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    1927, gift of J. Templeman Coolidge. (Accession Date: September 8, 1927)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Templeman Coolidge

    Details

    Dimensions

    41.28 x 14.61 x 9.53 cm (16 1/4 x 5 3/4 x 3 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    27.453

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone with traces of polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • Bosom of Abraham Trinity

    English
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1420–50
    Unidentified artist, English, 15th century (English)

    Object Place: Europe, Nottingham, England

    Description

    This startling image combines two devotional themes-the Trinity and Souls resting in the bosom of Old Testament-patriarch Abraham. The Trinity includes God, seated and blessing with his right hand; the crucified Christ; and the Holy Spirit symbolized by the dove painted at the top of the cross. A cloth draped across God’s chest contains small figures representing souls. This image offered comfort to its viewers, including the donors of the sculpture, who kneel at God’s feet, and hold scrolls which once contained their prayers. This large and ambitious alabaster carving would have been placed above an altar.

    Provenance

    From Spain, possibly the Cathedral of Jaca, and sold in Madrid [see note 1]. By 1919, Frank Gair Macomber (b. 1849 - d. 1941), Boston; 1927, sold by Macomber to the MFA for $1500. (Accession Date: December 8, 1927) NOTES: [1] According to Walter L. Hildburgh, who was the among the foremost experts on English alabaster carvings, this sculpture was "found in Spain" and "passed through Madrid," although his sources of this information are unknown. See W. L. Hildburgh, "Iconographic Peculiarities in English Medieval Alabaster Carvings, Part I," Folk-Lore 44 (March 1933), p. 50, n. 51 and ibid., "Some Presumably Datable Fragments of an English Alabaster Retable," Antiquaries Journal 24, nos. 1-2 (January-April, 1944), pp. 36-37. The sculpture was subsequently published by Anselmo Gascón de Gotor Giménez, Nueve Catedrales en Aragón (Zaragoza: Libreria General, 1945), pl. 5, with a caption indicating it was held by the cathedral of Jaca. By the date of this publication the sculpture had long since been at the MFA, and whether it had once been at Jaca is not known.

    Credit Line

    Decorative Arts Special Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    95.9 x 38.1 x 12.7 cm (37 3/4 x 15 x 5 in.)

    Accession Number

    27.852

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polychromy and gilding

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Mary and Joseph Adoring the Child

    English
    Medieval (Gothic)
    15th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    1929, Walter Gay (b. 1856 - d. 1937), Paris; gift of Walter Gay to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 5, 1929)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Walter Gay

    Details

    Dimensions

    31.8 x 18.4 x 3.8 cm (12 1/2 x 7 1/4 x 1 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    29.1024

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with traces of polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • The Kindred of Saint Anne (Holy Kith and Kin)

    English
    Medieval (Gothic)
    15th century
    Unidentified artist, English, 15th century (English)

    Object Place: England

    Description

    Provenance

    1929, Walter Gay (b. 1856 - d. 1937), Paris; gift of Walter Gay to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 5, 1929)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Walter Gay

    Details

    Dimensions

    38.1 x 27.9 x 4.8 cm (15 x 11 x 1 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    29.1025

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with traces of polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • Christ the Good Shepherd

    Portuguese
    17th century

    Object Place: Europe, Portugal

    Description

    In 3 niches around the oval base are sleeping figures of Joseph and two lambs. On the stepped pedestal above are more sheep and lambs with two small figures flanking a fountain mask. Above sits Joseph, sandals on his crossed feet, knee-length coat, a lamb

    Provenance

    1930, gift of Edward Royall Tyler (b. 1854 - d. 1942), Boston, to the MFA. (Accession Date: March 6, 1930)

    Credit Line

    Gift of E. Royall Tyler

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 22.5 x 7.4 x 6.6cm (8 7/8 x 2 15/16 x 2 5/8in.)

    Accession Number

    30.155

    Medium or Technique

    Ivory

    Not On View

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  • Thomas Jefferson

    French (Paris)
    1789
    Jean-Antoine Houdon (French, 1741–1828)

    Description

    Saravezza marble on gray and white marble base. Head turned slightly to right. Contemporary costume coat with standing collar, waistcoat with buttons, stock. Long hair tied at nape of neck; part of bow knot missing.


    The best-known likeness of the man who would be elected president in 1800, this bust captures the keen intelligence of the sitter and demonstrates Houdon’s superb talent for characterization. In 1785 Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) succeeded Benjamin Franklin as American minister to France. Jefferson immersed himself in the artistic and cultural life of Paris, studying firsthand neoclassical architecture and actively collecting books, prints, and works of art. Houdon, described by Jefferson as “perhaps the foremost artist in the world,” executed this startlingly lifelike bust in Paris shortly before Jefferson returned to the United States to assume the position of secretary of state.

    Signed

    Signed and dated "houdon f 1789".

    Provenance

    By the late 18th century, Count Antoine-Louis-Claude Destutt de Tracy (b. 1754- d. 1836), Château de Paray, Melun, France [see note 1]; 1839, by descent to Jacques Louis Leopold de Chateauvieux (d. 1868), Melun; 1868, by inheritance to his son, Ferdinand Le Clercq de Chateauvieux [see note 2]; 1916, by inheritance to his son, P. Le Clercq de Chateauvieux; 1928, sold by Le Clercq de Chateauvieux to Jean L. Souffrice, Neuilly-sur-Seine [see note 3]; 1934, sold by Souffrice, through the Marie Sterner Gallery, New York, to the MFA for $35,000. (Accession Date: April 5, 1934) NOTES: [1] The provenance of this object is taken from the translation of a statement signed by its former owner, P. Le Clerq de Chateauvieux (May 3, 1934; copy in MFA curatorial file). The sculpture is said to have been in the possession of the Destutt family at the end of the 18th century; "Monsieur de Destutt was a great friend of Jefferson who presented him with this bust before leaving France to return to America." This statement has not been verified; it has also been suggested that it was commissioned from the artist by the Destutt family (letter from Alfred L. Bush, The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Princeton, to the MFA, October 27, 1959). Leclerq de Chateauvieux writes that the sculpture passed into his family's collection in 1839, by descent and continues, "This bust was in my family home in Melun until 1869 and then became the possession of my father Ferdinand Le Clerq de Chateauvieux .... I inherited this bust at the death of my father in 1916." [2] This is verified by the translation of a statement addressed to the Intendant, Hôtel de Chateauvieux, Melun, signed by M. Villeminaux (April 16, 1868; copy in MFA curatorial file). [3] P. Leclerq de Chateauvieux (as above, n. 1) states that he decided to sell the bust when he received a commission to go to Morocco. When it was authenticated by Georges Giacometti, Paris (December 9, 1929, copy in MFA curatorial file), it is said to have remained in the Château de Paray until 1928. In a letter from Jacques Furst, Marie Sterner Gallery, to the MFA (March 30, 1934), it is said to have been purchased "by the present [gallery]" in 1928. Sterner Gallery acted as Souffrice's agent in the sale of the sculpture in 1934.

    Credit Line

    George Nixon Black Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    56.5 x 48 x 26 cm (22 1/4 x 18 7/8 x 10 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    34.129

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    On View

    Kristin and Roger Servison Gallery (Gallery 133)

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  • Little Fourteen-Year-Old Dancer

    La petite danseuse de quatorze ans

    French
    original model 1878–81, cast after 1921
    Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    This is Degas’s largest surviving sculpture and the only one he titled and exhibited. The original wax version, a portrait of a young Belgian dancer named Marie van Goethem, was shown at the 1881 Impressionist exhibition in Paris. The wax was tinted to resemble flesh, she wore a wig of real hair, and was dressed in pink slippers and bodice in addition to a skirt and ribbon similar to those on this cast. The excessive naturalism of the work offended many viewers, but the critic J.-K. Huysmans called it “the only really modern attempt that I know in sculpture.”

    Provenance

    Possibly Jeanne Févre, Nice, France [see note 1]. 1938, Marie Harriman Gallery, New York; 1938, sold by Harriman Gallery to the MFA for $3400. (Accession Date: December 8, 1938) NOTES: [1] Mlle. Févre was Degas's niece; this information comes from notes in the MFA curatorial file but has not been verified.

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund and Contributions from William Claflin and William Emerson

    Details

    Dimensions

    Total height: 103.7 cm; Height of Figure: 98 cm; Height of base: 5.7 cm; width of base 45.5 cm; depth of base: 46.5 cm

    Accession Number

    38.1756

    Medium or Technique

    Bronze, gauze and satin

    On View

    Sidney and Esther Rabb Gallery (Gallery 255)

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Statue of a prophet or a saint

    French (Burgundy)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1400
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France, Burgundy

    Description

    Provenance

    Until 1926, Count and Countess de Kermaingant; November 27, 1926, sold at Kermaingant sale, American Art Galleries, New York, lot 126, to Dikran G. Kélékian, New York [see note 1]; 1939, sold by Dikran G. Kélékian to the MFA for $1000. (Accession Date: November 9, 1939) NOTES: [1] See letter from Dikran G. Kélékian to the MFA (October 16, 1939) in MFA curatorial file.

    Credit Line

    Harriet Otis Cruft Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 67.2 x 25.6 x 18.6cm (26 7/16 x 10 1/16 x 7 5/16in.)

    Accession Number

    39.760

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intrasparite

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Architecture

    Italian (Florence)
    Renaissance
    about 1600
    Giambologna (Jean Boulogne) (Flemish (worked in Italy), 1529–1608)

    Object Place: Europe, Florence, Italy

    Description

    Figure of “Architecture”. Nude female figure wearing fillet, drapery over right leg, holding in right hand a drawing instruments and in her left a drawing board. Signed on lower edge of drawing, GIO BOLONGE.


    Personifying Architecture, this figure holds a framing square, protractor, and compass. The bronze’s surface finish is of the highest quality, and the graceful, twisting pose and turn of the head encourage viewing from all sides.

    Signed

    Signed on lower edge of tablet, GIO BOLONGE.

    Provenance

    Edmund Hegan Kennard (b. 1834 - d. 1912), London [see note 1]. By December 1937, with Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co., Inc., New York [see note 2]; by October, 1938, sold by Seligmann [see note 3]. M. Knoedler and Co., London; sold by Knoedler to Clendenin James Ryan (b. 1882 - d. 1939); January 19-20, 1940, posthumous Ryan sale, Parke Bernet, New York, to Paul M. Byk of Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co., for the MFA for $2420. (Accession Date: February 8, 1940) NOTES: [1] According to the Ryan auction cataloge ("Gothic and Renaissance Paintings and British XVIII Century Portraits," Parke Bernet Galleries, January 19-20, 1940, p. 125, cat. no. 270). [2] In a letter from Paul M. Byk of Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co. to George Edgell, MFA (December 4, 1937), the sculpture is referred to as "our" bronze -- i.e., in the possession of the gallery -- but "still in Europe". It was probably at the Paris branch of Arnold Seligmann et Cie. [3] See letter from Byk to Edwin J. Hipkiss of the MFA (October 6, 1938; in MFA curatorial file). He does not specify to whom it was sold.

    Credit Line

    Maria Antoinette Evans Fund and 1931 Purchase Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 45.1 x 12.1 x 15.2 cm (17 3/4 x 4 3/4 x 6 in.)

    Accession Number

    40.23

    Medium or Technique

    Metal; Bronze; marble base

    On View

    Alyce Morrissey Gallery (Kunstkammer) (Gallery 143)

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    Europe

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  • Virgin and Child

    German
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1490–95
    Tilman Riemenschneider (German, 1460–1531)

    Object Place: Europe, Wurzburg, Germany

    Description

    This Virgin wears a crown and stands upon a crescent moon, which associates her with the Woman of the Apocalypse from the Bible’s Book of Revelation. Riemenschneider presents the figures with great simplicity and humanity-the Virgin seems slightly melancholy and the Christ Child about to smile. Particularly touching is the way the Virgin holds one of her son’s feet while he clasps the other.

    Provenance

    Felix M. Warburg (b. 1871 - d. 1937), New York; by inheritance to his widow, Frieda Schiff Warburg (b. 1876 - d. 1958), New York; 1941, gift of Frieda Schiff Warburg to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 11, 1941)

    Credit Line

    Gift in memory of Felix M. Warburg by his wife Frieda Schiff Warburg

    Details

    Dimensions

    120.7 x 38.1 x 20.2 cm (47 1/2 x 15 x 7 15/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    41.653

    Medium or Technique

    Limewood

    On View

    William A. Coolidge Gallery (Gallery 243A)

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Angel from an Archivolt

    French (Burgundy)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    end of 13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    Abbé Terret, Autun, France. 1931, Hans Wendland (b. 1880), Lugano and Paris; April 24-25, 1931, Wendland sale, Ball and Graupe, Berlin, lot 265. 1931, Raphael Stora, Paris; September 15, 1931, sold by Stora to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P8056); 1942, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $800. (Accession Date: November 12, 1942)

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    39.4 x 19.7 x 8.3 cm (15 1/2 x 7 3/4 x 3 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    42.493

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone with traces of recent polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Kneeling Knight

    Spanish
    about 1600
    Unidentified artist, Spanish (Spanish)

    Object Place: Spain

    Description

    Alabaster. Full-round figure of bearded nobleman kneeling on tasseled cushion on rectangular stepped plinth, hands in prayer. Full armor, ruff at neck and cuffs, scabbard (sword broken) at left, sheathed dagger at back. Said to be from Zamorra, Spain.

    Provenance

    A monastery in Zamora, Spain (?) [see note 1]. Spanish Art Gallery, London; sold by the Spanish Art Gallery to William Randolph Hearst (b. 1863 - d. 1951), New York; November 28, 1940, sold by Hearst to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N4831); 1944, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $26,000. (Accession Date: November 9, 1944) NOTES: [1] When this sculpture was acquired from Brummer Gallery, it was said to have come from a monastery in Zamora, and to represent Don Monzo Averesque, the monastery's founder.

    Credit Line

    1939 Purchase Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 152.4 x 63.5 x 77.5 cm, 491.7 kg (60 x 25 x 30 1/2 in., 1084 lb.) Mounted (rolling steel base/2 removal slots ontop for inserting straps): 133.4 x 99.1 x 64.8 cm, 90.72 kg (52 1/2 x 39 x 25 1/2 in., 200 lb.)

    Accession Number

    44.813

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster

    On View

    Gothic Gallery (Gallery 218)

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Virgin of the Annunciation

    French
    Medieval (Gothic)
    late 15th–early 16th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Toulouse, France

    Description

    Provenance

    October, 1925, sold by F. Zaclese, Paris, to Joseph Brummer (b. 1883 - d. 1947), for the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P2143); April 7, 1926, sold by Brummer to Elie Nadelman (b. 1882 - d. 1946), New York. 1944, Max Glückselig, New York; July 7, 1944, sold by Glückselig to the Brummer Gallery (stock no. N5997); 1945, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $3600. (Accession Date: November 8, 1945)

    Credit Line

    Helen and Alice Colburn Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    61.1 x 62.1 x 32.5 cm (24 1/16 x 24 7/16 x 12 13/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.774

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, biosparite

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Mourning Virgin with Saint John from an Entombment

    French (Lorraine?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    15th century

    Object Place: Europe, Lorraine (?), France

    Description

    Provenance

    Ferdinand Roybet (b. 1840 -d. 1920), Paris; November 19, 1920, Roybet sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, lot 62 [see note 1]. 1945, Gabriel Dereppe, New York; August 14, 1945, sold by Dereppe sold to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N6345); 1946, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $8000. (Accession Date: January 10, 1946) NOTES: [1] The Mourning Virgin and Saint John were sold as part of an Entombment group, which also included a recumbent Christ, a Holy Woman, Joseph of Aramithea, and two angels. The present whereabouts of these figures is unknown.

    Credit Line

    Harriet Otis Cruft Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.5 x 30.8 x 25.4 cm (28 15/16 x 12 1/8 x 10 in.)

    Accession Number

    46.2

    Medium or Technique

    Limestone with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Shepherd with Bagpipes

    Spanish (Aragon ?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    mid-15th century
    Unidentified artist, Spanish (Aragonese?)

    Description

    Provenance

    1932, Joseph Pijoan (b. 1881 - d. 1963), New York; December 16, 1932, sold by Pijoan to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N3072); 1946, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $1650. (Accession Date: June 13, 1946)

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    31.8 x 22.9 x 12.7 cm (12 1/2 x 9 x 5 in.)

    Accession Number

    46.459

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Virgin of the Annunciation

    Italian (Siena)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1330
    Workshop of Goro di Gregorio (Italian)

    Object Place: Europe, Siena, Italy

    Description

    Provenance

    1910, Ludwig von Buerkel (b. 1877 - d. 1946), Florence; October 29, 1910, Buerkel sale, Helbing, Munich, lot 4 [see note 1]. Adolf von Beckerath (b. 1834 - d. 1915), Berlin; May 23-26, 1916, Beckerath estate sale, Lepke, Berlin, lot 16, unsold; November 20-21, 1916, Beckerath estate sale, Lepke, Berlin, lot 156 [see note 2]. February 24-25, 1920, anonymous sale, Lepke, Berlin, lot 462. By 1938, Eugene L. Garbáty (b. 1880 - d. 1966), Schloss Alt-Döbern, Niederlausitz (Germany), New York, and East Norwalk, CT [see note 3]; 1946, gift of Eugene L. Garbáty to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 12, 1946) NOTES: [1] Attributed in the catalogue to the Master of the Madonna della Spina at Pisa. [2] Attributed in the Beckerath catalogues to Giovanni Pisano. [3] Eugene Garbáty emigrated from Berlin to New York between 1938 and 1939, bringing much of his art collection with him.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Eugene L. Garbáty

    Details

    Dimensions

    64.1 x 13.97 x 22.86 cm (25 1/4 x 5 1/2 x 9 in.)

    Accession Number

    46.843

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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  • Caryatid group of a deacon and two acolytes

    Italian (Bologna)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1265–68
    Attributed to Arnolfo di Cambio (Italian)

    Description

    These three clerics hold objects used during celebration of the Mass. A deacon-distinguished by his stole and the maniple (a strip of silk worn at Mass) that drapes from his wrist-carries the pillow that supports the missal containing the text of the Mass. The acolytes hold a pitcher for the water or wine and the pyx, a container for the Eucharist. The group was a supporting element for the tomb of Saint Dominic in the church of the same name in Bologna. Arnolfo di Cambio created this sculpture in the shop of his master, Giovanni Pisano; he later became a master sculptor and architect, providing the initial designs for the cathedral in Florence and sculptures for its facade. (MCambareri, 2W02, 2004).

    Provenance

    About 1265/1268, Arca di San Domenico, Bologna (original commission). Publio Podio, Bologna [see note 1]. 1929, Enrico Testa; August 16, 1929, sold by Testa to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P6466); 1947, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $45,000. (Accession Date: June 12, 1947) NOTES: [1] Cesare Gnudi, "Nicola, Arnolfo, [e] Lapo" (Florence, 1948), p. 101.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    102.9 x 29.2 x 21.0 cm (40 1/2 x 11 1/2 x 8 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1290

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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    Europe

    Classifications

    Silver-gilt

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  • Crowned Head

    Italian
    Medieval (Gothic)
    late 13th century
    Follower of Nicola Pisano (Italian (Tuscany), about 1220/25–before 1284)

    Object Place: Europe, Italy

    Description

    This small head probably came from a relief panel with a scene such as that of the three kings worshiping the infant Jesus. A softer stone than marble, alabaster allows for intricate, delicate carving on a small scale. The sculptor used a drill to create the curls in the hair and beard of this figure, and he carved the eyes and mouth with great subtlety to achieve an animated expression.

    Provenance

    13th century, made as part of an unidentified sculptural ensemble [see note 1]. 1936, Jacques Cohen, New York; April 22, 1936, sold by Cohen to Joseph Brummer (b. 1883 - d. 1947), New York (stock no. N3889); 1947, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $1200. (Accession Date: November 13, 1947) NOTES: [1] The origins of the MFA Crowned Head, evidently removed from a larger ensemble, remain unclear. Christine Verzar and Charles T. Little have noted that it is "the same size and style of the body of a now-headless king on the lintel by Nicola Pisano at the cathedral of Lucca." However, this has not been verified. See their essay, "Gothic Italy: Reflections of Antiquity," in Set in Stone: The Face in Medieval Sculpture (exh. cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 2007), 150, n. 2.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    10.48 x 7.6 x 9.5 cm (4 1/8 x 3 x 3 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1446

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Console with a Figure with Crossed Legs

    French (Northern France or Ile-de-France)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    second half of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Provenance

    Albert Figdor (b. 1843 - d. 1927), Vienna. 1930, Arnold Seligmann Rey and Co., New York; March 11, 1930, sold by Arnold Seligmann Rey to Joseph Brummer (b. 1883 - d. 1947), New York (stock no. N2916); 1947, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $1600. (Accession Date: November 13, 1947)

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    12.7 x 14.0 x 7.9 cm (5 x 5 1/2 x 3 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1448

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Sculpture

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  • Saint Peter as Pope

    French (Eastern) or Luxembourg (?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    third quarter of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    St. Peter was considered the first Pope because of Christ’s charge to him: “Thou are Peter and on you I found my church”. Peter is shown here in papal ceremonial dress, with the triple-crowned tiara signifying his spiritual and temporal authority. This crown and the clasp of his stole, or cope, would have originally been encrusted with jewels. St. Peter blesses with his right hand, and would once have held keys in his left hand, recalling that Christ gave him “the keys to the kingdom of heaven.” This imposing sculpture would have asserted papal authority and primacy by making clear the connections between St. Peter and the Pope.

    Provenance

    1945, Demotte, New York; October 26, 1945, sold by Demotte to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N6467); 1948, sold by the Brummer Gallery to the MFA for $7000. (Accession Date: March 11, 1948)

    Credit Line

    1948 Purchase Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 152.5 x 47 x 40.6cm (60 1/16 x 18 1/2 x 16in.) Mount (wooden pallet /UHMW pad ): 10.2 x 61 x 68.6 cm (4 x 24 x 27 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.265

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intrasparite, with traces of polychromy

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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    Europe

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  • Relief of Christ

    French (Limoges)
    Medieval
    about 1210
    Made at Limoges (France)

    Object Place: Europe, Limoges, France

    Description

    Frontal crucified Christ wearing a dalmatic and alb. A single copper sheet, cut out, repoussé (into a mold), champlevé, engraved, chased, enameled, and gilded. There is one pinhole in each hand. The eyes are dark-blue glass; the crown, inset with small beads of the same blue glass, is separate. The hole in the center of the belt probably held a cabochon. Enamel colors are lapis blue, green, red, and yellow in single and mixed fields of two colors. Christ’s centrally parted wavy hair falls over the shoulder. Only the bottom of the alb (green with red dots) and its gilded cuffs, engraved to show folds, are visible below the lapis-blue dalmatic, which falls in two vertical rows of V-shaped folds, marked in reserve. It has a tied belt engraved with a simple wave pattern that continues down the front in two bands. The collar is green with circular and lozenge-shaped areas of red and yellow simulating gems.

    Provenance

    By 1935, Robert Woods Bliss (b. 1875 - d. 1962), Washington, D.C.; March 17, 1937, sold by Bliss to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N4045); April 23, 1949, Brummer sale, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, lot 712a, to the MFA for $275. (Accession Date: May 12, 1949)

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    18.3 x 15.5 x 2.1 cm (7 3/16 x 6 1/8 x 13/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    49.472

    Medium or Technique

    Champlevé enamel and gilding on copper

    Not On View

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Enamels

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  • Head of A youthful Bishop

    German
    Medieval (Gothic)
    mid-13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Provenance

    Pierre Decroix, Lille. Henri Garnier, Lille. 1936, Demotte, New York; February 14, 1936, sold by Demotte to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N3789); April 23, 1949, Brummer sale, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, lot 746, to the MFA for $375. (Accession Date: May 12, 1949)

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    30.48 x 22.86 x 22.86 cm (12 x 9 x 9 in.)

    Accession Number

    49.473

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, pelsparite

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Virgin and Child on a Lion

    Austrian (Styria)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1415
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany or Austria

    Description

    Provenance

    1913, Max Guggenheimer; May 19-21, 1913, Guggenheimer sale, Helbing, Munich, lot 569. 1928, Satori, Vienna; September 10, 1928, sold by Satori to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P5510); May 13, 1949, Brummer sale, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, lot 594, to the MFA for $500. (Accession Date: May 12, 1949)

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    125.7 x 35 x 30.5 cm (49 1/2 x 13 3/4 x 12 in.)

    Accession Number

    49.485

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Baptism of Christ

    French (Limoges)
    Medieval
    mid-13th century
    Made at Limoges (France)

    Object Place: Limoges, France

    Description

    Relief with three pinholes (in the ewer and lower corners) representing John the Baptist in three-quarter view pouring water from a ewer over a nimbed frontal Christ. With his right arm raised in benediction, Christ stands immersed to the thighs in water (the river Jordan). Single copper sheet, repoussé (into a mold), cut out, champlevé, engraved, chased, enameled, and gilded. The blue glass eyes are inset. Both figures have finely chased long hair and beards. Curved segments of white enamel indicate the movement of the water, in which fish are in reserve and engraved. All except two swim to the left. Saint John’s garment is chased to indicate fur on the outside.


    This relief was originally one of several scenes from the life of Christ that were mounted on a flat plaque that decorated an altar. It is of exceptional quality, with the gilded-copper surface skillfully worked to capture the textures of hair, fur, and water. The relief is unusual in showing John the Baptist baptizing Jesus in two ways—by pouring water from a ewer over his head and by immersing him in the river Jordan. Jesus, his hand raised in blessing, stands in water whose ripples are suggested by curved segments of white enamel interspersed with shapes of swimming fish.

    Provenance

    By 1865, Albert Germeau (d. by 1868), France [see note 1]; May 5, 1868, Germeau sale, Hotel Drouot, Paris, lot 51. By 1880, Princess Isabella Dzialynska (née Czartoryski) (b. 1832 - d. 1899), Goluchow Castle, Poznan, Poland; until World War II, by descent within Czartoryski family [see note 2]. By 1950, J. Pollack (dealer), Paris; sold by Pollack to Wildenstein and Co., New York; 1950, sold by Wildenstein to the MFA [see note 3]. (Accession Date: May 11, 1950) NOTES: [1] Albert Germeau was the prefect of Oise, France, in 1838. [2] During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the Czartoryski family were celebrated collectors of art in Poland. They housed their collections in the Czartoryski Museum, Kraków, and the Goluchow Castle, Poznan. With the German invasion of Poland in 1939, the family hid much of their collection behind a fake wall at Sieniawa Palace (outside Kraków), in the basement of the museum, and in a relative's home in Pewkinie. Nazis eventually discovered and confiscated many of these works of art, which were moved about several times during the war. While Allied forces restituted much of the collection after the war, many objects had been traded, lost, and looted and were not returned to the Czartoryski family. [3] In 1951, Prince Wladyslaw Czartoryski of London filed a lawsuit notifying both Wildenstein and the MFA that this object and another enamel (MFA no. 51.7) had been unlawfully seized by the Nazis from his family's collection during World War II. A settlement was ultimately reached among all parties, giving the MFA full ownership of both enamels. Prince Czartoryski signed an agreement on July 11, 1955 assigning legal ownership of the objects to Wildenstein and the MFA (in MFA curatorial file). It was further arranged between Wildenstein and the MFA that the museum was the full owner of the enamels; this is documented in a letter from Georges Wildenstein to Georg Swarzenski of the MFA (June 30, 1955; in MFA curatorial file).

    Credit Line

    Francis Bartlett Donation of 1912

    Details

    Dimensions

    36.8 x 21.1 x 2.8 cm (14 1/2 x 8 5/16 x 1 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    50.858

    Medium or Technique

    Champlevé enamel and gilding on copper

    On View

    I. W. Colburn Chapel Gallery (Gallery 254A)

    Collections

    Europe

    Classifications

    Enamels

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  • Saint Malo

    French (Normandy, from Harcouët [Calvados])
    Medieval (Gothic)
    second half of 13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Place of Origin: Harcouët (Calvados), Normandy, France

    Description

    Holding a small model of a church or a reliquary in his hand, this smiling young man is Saint Malo, a sixth-century saint venerated in northern France, where a town on the Brittany coast bears his name. One tale associated with Saint Malo tells of him walking on water, which explains the representation of waves below the feet of this image. The monumentality of the figure and his lively expression give the sculpture a vivid presence.

    Provenance

    Possibly the Castle of Harcouët, Saint-Hilaire-du-Harcouët, Calvados, France [see note 1]; between 1918 and 1939, removed from Harcouët and sold in Paris to Sidney Burney, London [see note 2]; sold by Burney to John Hunt, Dublin; 1954, sold by John Hunt to the MFA for $9,835. (Accession Date: December 9, 1954) NOTES: [1] When the sculpture was acquired it was said to have come from Saint-Hilaire-du- Harcouët. Hanns Swarzenski of the MFA visited the town and was told that it had been in the castle chapel until it was shipped to Paris after World War I. See "A Masterpiece of Gothic Sculpture," MFA Bulletin 54, no. 295 (Spring 1956): 8. [2] See Swarzenski (as above, n. 1): 9.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 147.3 x 50.8 x 31.8cm (58 x 20 x 12 1/2in.) Mount (Wooden pallet / 1/4" thick "Volara" pad(bolted-3/4" brass rod)): 10.2 x 63.5 x 71.1 cm (4 x 25 x 28 in.)

    Accession Number

    54.1797

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, microsparite, from Caen

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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    Europe

    Classifications

    Sculpture

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  • Sleeping Endymion

    Italian
    1716
    Agostino Cornacchini (Italian (Roman), 1686–1754)

    Object Place: Europe, Italy

    Description

    On rough hewn crag, flowers & sleeping setter at base. Furred cloak (broken at back). Chiseled uneven back surface with hole. Signed and dated in hollow underneath.


    This terra cotta represents the shepherd Endymion, beloved of Diana, goddess of the moon. Jupiter granted him eternal youth through eternal sleep, and Diana protected him as he slept. Created as a model for a bronze, this terra cotta was also appreciated as a work of art in itself. The delicate modeling of Endymion’s head and flesh, his charming dog, and the details of costume and foliage exemplify the freshness and immediacy of the terra cotta medium.

    Signed

    Incised on back of rock base: "Ag Cor/nacchini/1716".

    Provenance

    By 1722, Francesco Maria Niccolò Gabburri (b. 1676 - d. 1742), Florence [see note 1]. 1941, private collection, Germany; May, 1941, sold from this private collection to Julius Böhler, Munich [see note 2]; 1950, sold by Böhler to Blumka Gallery, New York; 1956, sold by Blumka Gallery to the MFA for $800. (Accession Date: March 8, 1956) NOTES: [1] See Bruce Boucher et al., "Earth and Fire: Italian Terracotta Sculpture from Donatello to Canova" (New Haven and London, 2001), p. 234. The sculpture was listed in Gabburri's 1722 inventory. [2] Correspondence from Galerie Julius Böhler to the MFA (May 9, 2006; in MFA curatorial file).

    Credit Line

    H. E. Bolles Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    33.7 x 27 x 32 cm (13 1/4 x 10 5/8 x 12 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    56.141

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta

    On View

    Angelica Lloyd Russell Gallery (Gallery 142)

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  • The Entombment

    Italian (Milan)
    about 1800
    Possibly by Camillo Pacetti (Italian, 1758–1826), Formerly attributed to Antonio Canova (Italian, 1757–1822)

    Object Place: Europe, Italy

    Description

    Terracotta sketch. Four draped figures supporting central figure on rectangular block lower base extending front and end.


    This may have been a sketch for a work in marble, but it would have been difficult to translate the composition into such a heavy material, given the way Christ’s body hangs free, with no support from below. The clay is very loosely worked, and the faces lack much detail. Rather, it is the sense of the struggle to move the body with care, the expressive postures of the other figures, and the weighty drapery that create a sense of sorrow and grief.

    Provenance

    1953, Julius Wilhelm Böhler, Lucerne; September 1953, sold by Böhler to Galerie Julius Böhler, Munich; 1956, sold by Julius Böhler to the MFA for $700. (Accession Date: May 10, 1956)

    Credit Line

    H. E. Bolles Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 30 x 39.2 x 19.4 cm (11 13/16 x 15 7/16 x 7 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    56.305

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta

    On View

    Angelica Lloyd Russell Gallery (Gallery 142)

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  • Soyez amoureuses vous serez heureuses (Be In Love and You Will Be Happy)

    French
    1889
    Paul Gauguin (French, 1848–1903)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Carved and polychromed wood panel in original frame. “Soyez amoureuses vous serez heureuses” on arch amid figures and faces. Gauguin grasping hand of nude woman seated at left. Mourning female nude, cat and flowers at right.


    Gauguin accorded great importance to his sculptures. His childhood memories of Peru, a trip to Martinique, and the African art he saw at the 1889 Universal Exposition in Paris stimulated his interest in “primitive” civilizations and prompted him to convey the same spontaneity and vigor in his own work. This relief was carved during one of Gauguin’s immensely productive visits to Pont-Aven, in Brittany. He wrote that he considered it “the best and strangest thing I have ever done in sculpture. Gauguin (as monster) seizing the hand of a protesting woman and telling her: ‘Be in love and you will be happy.’” Much about this sculpture foreshadows the art Gauguin created after he left France for the islands of the South Pacific.

    Provenance

    1889 until 1893, with the Galerie Goupil (Boussod et Valadon), Paris [see note 1]. 1907, private collection [see note 2]. Émile Schuffenecker (b. 1851 - d. 1934), Paris; by 1928, his brother, Amédée Schuffenecker (b. 1854 - d. 1936), Saint-Maur; 1936, by inheritance to his niece (Émile's daughter), Jeanne Schuffenecker, Paris [see note 3]. By 1949, private collection (possibly Margaret Thompson Biddle, b. 1902 - d. 1956), Paris [see note 4]; June 14, 1957, posthumous Biddle sale, Galerie Charpentier, Paris, lot A, to Huguette Berès (b. 1914 - d. 1999), Paris, for the MFA for $33,887.71. (Accession Date: September 12, 1957) NOTES: [1] Gauguin consigned the sculpture for sale to the Galerie Goupil; in 1893 it was returned to him at the studio of Daniel de Monfried. See George T. M. Shackelford, introduction to Gauguin Tahiti (exh. cat. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2003), pp. 7, 10-11, and p. 342 (Chronology), and Christopher Gray, Sculpture and Ceramics of Paul Gauguin (New York, 1983), pp. 42, 195, and 207. [2] Lent from a private collection to the exhibition "Paul Gauguin" (Galerie Miethke, Vienna, March-April, 1907), cat. no. 6. Whether Schuffenecker already owned it at this time, and was the private collector listed in the catalogue, is not known. [3] In 1928, Amédée Schuffenecker lent the sculpture to Musée du Luxembourg and in 1932, he offered it for purchase to the French government. Upon his death the sculpture was inherited by his niece. See Anne Pingeot, "The House of Pleasure: Tahiti and the Marquesas, 1895-1903,” in Gauguin Tahiti (as above, n. 1), pp. 264-265. [4] The sculpture was lent from a private collection to "Gauguin, Exposition du Centenaire" (Orangerie des Tuileries, Paris, 1949), cat. no. 80 and "Gauguin" (Musée Cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, February 15 - April 16, 1950), cat. no. 50. It may have been owned at this time by Margaret Thompson Biddle, in whose posthumous auction it was included in 1957.

    Credit Line

    Arthur Tracy Cabot Fund

    Details

    Catalogue Raisonné

    Gray 076

    Dimensions

    95 x 72 x 6.4 cm (37 3/8 x 28 3/8 x 2 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    57.582

    Medium or Technique

    Carved and painted linden wood

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child

    Italian (Lombardy or Emilia-Romagna)
    Medieval (Romanesque)
    1125-1150
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Italy, Lombardy or Emilia-Romagna

    Description

    This image is an early example in Italian sculpture of a new devotional emphasis on the humanity of Christ. It stresses the warm intimacy between mother and son as they draw their heads together and look into each other’s eyes, with the child reaching his arms around Mary’s neck. The figure of Christ looks more like a small man than a baby; perhaps this was meant to recall the Old Testament song of Songs, in which the bride and groom came to be seen as references to Mary and Christ. Carved completely in the round, this stone sculpture would have been placed upon an altar, inspiring prayer and meditation.

    Provenance

    By 1955, Luigi Albrighi, Florence; 1957, sold by Albrighi to the MFA for $23,000. (Accession Date: September 12, 1957)

    Credit Line

    Maria Antoinette Evans Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    74 x 40 x 22 cm (29 1/8 x 15 3/4 x 8 11/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    57.583

    Medium or Technique

    Limestone with polychromy

    On View

    I. W. Colburn Chapel Gallery (Gallery 254A)

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  • Pomona

    German
    1932
    Gerhard Marcks (German, 1889–1981)

    Description

    Limestone. Nude figure with hair braided at neck, scarf held in both hands across lower back, seated on block of two rectangles, solid behind and beneath raised right leg.


    Marcks carved this figure of the Roman goddess of fruit trees after a 1928 trip to Greece and Rome solidified his passion for early Greek sculpture. Though he explored Expressionism early in his career, Marcks later said: “I stayed with the Greeks; … in an epoch dominated by a subjective conception of art, I strive for an objective art, for craftsmanship, tradition, nature.”

    Provenance

    Sold by the artist to Fritz von Borries (b. 1892 - d. 1975), Lübeck and Bad Schwartau, Germany [see note 1]; between about 1952 and 1957, sold by von Borries, possibly through the Galerie Günther Francke, Munich, to the Galerie Rudolf Hoffmann, Hamburg; 1958, sold by Galerie Rudolf Hoffmann to the MFA for $2,400. (Accession Date: January 9, 1958) NOTES: [1] Arie Hartog of the Gerhard-Marcks-Haus kindly provided the MFA with documentaton of the sale of this sculpture to Fritz von Borries (a friend of the artist's family) of Lübeck after it was exhibited at the Galerie Cassirer in 1933.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Copyright

    (c) Gerhard-marcks-Stiftung, Breman 2010

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 95.3 cm (37 1/2 in.) Front edge: 13.5 inches Back edge: 14.25 inches Sides are about 18.5 inches

    Accession Number

    58.18

    Medium or Technique

    Austrian limestone

    On View

    Charlotte F. and Irving W. Rabb Gallery (Gallery 155)

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  • Education of the Virgin

    French (Ile-de-France)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    mid-14th century

    Object Place: Europe, Ile-de-France, France

    Description

    Provenance

    1958, Blumka Gallery, New York; 1958, sold by Blumka to the MFA for $1,400.00 (Accession Date: December 11, 1958)

    Credit Line

    Gift of the Class of the Museum of Fine Arts (Mrs. Arthur L.Devens Chairman)

    Details

    Dimensions

    25.9 x 24.4 x 16.2 cm (10 3/16 x 9 5/8 x 6 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    58.1191

    Medium or Technique

    Marble

    Not On View

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  • Lamentation

    Southern Netherlandish (Flanders) or German (Swabia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1460
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Munich (inv. no. 415); 1959, sold by the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum to the MFA for $1000 [see note 1]. (Accession Date: January 8, 1959) NOTES: [1] According to a January 8, 1959 acquisition recommendation from Hanns Swarzenski, the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum needed funds to purchase an important Bavarian silver object from a New York dealer. By request of Swarzenski and the museum's director, Theodor Muller, the government granted the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum permission to sell duplicate objects in its collection to raise the necessary funds.

    Credit Line

    William E. (?) Nickerson Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    24.8 x 27.9 x 8.9 cm (9 3/4 x 11 x 3 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    59.176

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child

    French (Soissons?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1210–25
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    This group of the Virgin and Child displays a calm serenity and stillness. The Virgin wears a crown and probably once held a scepter in her right hand, characterizing her as Queen of Heaven. With the Christ Child seated on her lap, she is also the “Throne of Wisdom”. This sculpture would have decorated an altar and similar images, painted and lavishly gilded, were known to inspire intense devotion and were sometimes thought to perform miracles. The long, smooth folds of the drapery and the elongated proportions and small heads of the figures recall sculptures that decorate the exterior of Gothic cathedrals, especially the famous cathedral of Chartres in France.

    Provenance

    Acquired in France by Joseph Mezzara (b. 1820 - d. 1901), Paris [see note 1]; by inheritance to his daughter, Mme. Marthe Ida Mezzara Dufet, Paris; 1942, sold by Mme. Dufet to Walter Bornheim (b. 1888), Cologne; taken by Bornheim to Munich for conservation and displayed at the Galerie Alte Kunst [see note 2]; 1942, exchanged by Bornheim with Dr. Otto H. Förster, General Director for Museum of the City of Cologne, for the Wallraf-Richartz Museum [see note 3]; taken to Tegernsee, near Munich [see note 4]; 1945, collected by Allied forces and returned to France [see note 5]; restituted to Mme. Dufet; 1959, sold by Mme. Dufet to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 14, 1959) NOTES: [1] According to Hanns Swarzenski, "A Vierge d'Orée," MFA Bulletin 58 (1960): 78, the sculptor Joseph Mezzara discovered the Virgin and Child while conducting conservation work in an abandoned chapel near Conflans, France. Mezzara took the sculpture to Paris around 1900. [2] Following World War II, Walter Bornheim was interrogated by the Art Looting Investigation Unit (ALIU) of the U.S. Office of Strategic Services for his activities on behalf of Hermann Göring. According to this report (September 15, 1945), Bornheim negotiated with Mme. Dufet for several months before purchasing the sculpture. He was granted an export license and took the sculpture to Munich for conservation work, first at the Doerner Institute, and, in Cologne, by Frau Brabenden. This account is corroborated by Bornheim's testimony in a letter to Hanns Swarzenski of the MFA (March 10, 1960). [3] Although Bornheim worked for Göring during the war, he claimed (ALIU report; see above, n. 2) that he had wanted the sculpture to go to a German museum rather than to Göring. Göring agreed to give up his right of first refusal. Bornheim exchanged the sculpture and a painting by Lancret with the Wallraf-Richartz Museum, Cologne, for 300,000 RM and sixteen pictures; Göring took four of these for having ceded his rights. Press accounts mistakenly claimed that Göring himself had acquired the sculpture (see, for example, Life, December 7, 1959, p. 101, and Connoisseur, May 1960, p. 212). [4] Presumably the sculpture was removed to Tegernsee by the city of Cologne for safe keeping. [5] Hans Förster claimed in a letter to Hanns Swarzenski (December 17, 1959) that the sculpture rightly belonged to the Museums of the City of Cologne, and referred to Tegernsee as its "hiding place." However, as Swarzenski stated in his response (February 9, 1960), the restitution to France was done according to Military Government regulations (Title 18, Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives) as wartime sales to German buyers in occupied countries were considered invalid. This was agreed upon by the Allies in "The Declaration of London" (January 5, 1943), reproduced in Elizabeth Simpson, ed., The Spoils of War (New York, 1997), Appendix 9, p. 287. Additional directives relevant to the sculpture's restitution are laid out in a letter from Hayden N. Smith, New York, to Andrew Ritchie, New Haven (January 8, 1960; in MFA curatorial file).

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    154.9 x 53.3 x 45.1 cm (61 x 21 x 17 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    59.701

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy and gilding

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Male Head

    French
    Medieval (Gothic)
    13th–14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1960, Mme. R. Hein, Paris [see note 1]; 1960, sold by Mme. R. Hein to the MFA for $612.60. (Accession Date: September 21, 1960) NOTES: [1] See letter, H. Swarzenski, September 21, 1960, in museum file, where a correspondence of "many years" regarding the sculpture between himself and Mme. Hein is suggested. Swarzenski believed sculpture was from Reims Cathedral, but that has been questioned by G.S. Wright in "Gothic Sculpture in America," Vol. I, The New England Museums (1989, p.18).

    Credit Line

    Helen and Alice Colburn Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    12.7 x 10.7 x 11.4 cm (5 x 4 3/16 x 4 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    60.940

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone

    Not On View

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  • Self-Portrait as a Warrior

    Austrian (Vienna)
    1909
    Oskar Kokoschka (Austrian, 1886–1980)

    Description

    Bust. Head turned right. Open mouth showing white teeth. Blue eyes, various red, blue and yellow on face and hair.


    This startling self-image marks Kokoschka’s first foray into an expressionist style, as he presented his own features distorted with suffering. His skin seems peeled back to reveal nerves and raw flesh. When it was first displayed in 1909, the bust was ridiculed by most who saw it. However, Adolf Loos, an architect and critic, bought the work, recognizing young Kokoschka’s brilliant new approach, which rejected the graceful, linear forms of the popular Art Nouveau style in favor of a brutally expressive quality.

    Signed

    Signed on right shoulder: OK

    Provenance

    1909 until 1933, Adolf Loos (b. 1870 - d. 1933), Vienna [see note 1]; acquired from the estate of Loos by Helene Scheu-Riesz (b. 1880 - d. 1970), Vienna and New York; 1956, still with Scheu-Riesz [see note 2]. By 1958, World House Galleries, New York; 1960, sold by World House Galleries to the MFA for $7,000. (Accession Date: September 21, 1960) NOTES: [1] The artist exhibited this sculpture at the second Internationale Kunstschau, Vienna (May - September, 1909), where it was purchased by the architect Adolf Loos. [2] Helene Scheu-Riesz and her husband, Gustav Scheu, were friends with Adolf Loos. According to a letter from Scheu-Riesz to Friedrich Welz of the Galerie Welz, Salzburg (May 23, 1956; copy of letter kindly provided by Dr. Johann Winkler): "it came into my possession from the estate of Adolf Loos and I brought it with me when I immigrated to New York in 1937 - it is being kept by friends." While the sculpture was in Scheu-Riesz's possession, it was lent under the name of the Blanche Bonestell Gallery to the exhibitions "Kokoschka," Buchholz Gallery, New York (October 27-November 15, 1941), cat. no. 5 and "Oskar Kokoschka: A Retrospective Exhibition," Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston and Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1948, cat. no. 63. Whether the Bonestell Gallery was taking care of the bust at the time the 1956 letter was written is unknown; at this date Scheu-Riesz was offering it for sale. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: The Third Reich denigrated modern art and artists like Kokoschka. The Nazi party seized what it called "degenerate art" from German museums, selling the objects for foreign currency or destroying them. To further demonstrate to the German people what type of art was unacceptable, the Nazis sponsored an exhibition called "Degenerate Art" (Entartete Kunst), which opened in Munich in 1937 and toured Germany and Austria until 1941. The show included hundreds of objects seized from German collections. Self-Portrait as Warrior was illustrated as an example of "degenerate art" in reviews of Entartete Kunst at its Stettin and Vienna venues, in the journals Stettiner General-Anzeiger (January 24, 1939) and Die Pause (June 1939). It was also illustrated in the third edition of the exhibition catalogue. It was not actually exhibited, however; as Helene Scheu-Riesz attested, she had already brought it to the United States in 1937. Old photographs were used each time it was reproduced, indicating the Nazis could not obtain the original sculpture.

    Credit Line

    John H. and Ernestine A. Payne Fund

    Copyright

    © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Pro Litteris, Zurich.

    Details

    Dimensions

    36.5 x 31.5 x 19.5 cm (14 3/8 x 12 3/8 x 7 11/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    60.958

    Medium or Technique

    Unfired clay painted with tempera

    On View

    Charlotte F. and Irving W. Rabb Gallery (Gallery 155)

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  • Lamentation

    Austrian (Salzburg)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1415
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Austria

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1959, acquired in Paris by Count Ernst Otto von Solms-Laubach (b. 1890 - d. 1977), Frankfurt [see note 1]; 1961, sold by Solms-Laubach, through Wilhelm Henrich, Frankfurt, to the MFA for $5,000. (Accession Date: January 11, 1961) NOTES: [1] Hanns Swarzenski, "Eine Beweinungsgruppe des weichen Stils in Boston," in Studien zur Geschichte der europäischen Plastik. Festschrift Theodor Müller (Munich, 1965), p. 113, noted that Solms-Laubach bought the sculpture on the Paris art market and took it to Frankfurt. Discussion between Solms-Laubach and the MFA regarding its sale began in 1959.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Bequest Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    27.94 x 57.2 x 20.3 cm (11 x 22 1/2 x 8 in.)

    Accession Number

    61.158

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, biosparite, with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Corbel with Cowled Head

    French (Eastern) or German (Middle Rhine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    second half of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    Strasbourg Cathedral [see note 1]. 1793, possibly removed from Cathedral [see note 2]. 1961, sold by Mme R. Hein, Paris, to the MFA for $1,557.50. (Accession date: March 8, 1961) NOTES: [1] See letter by H. Swarzenski, March 8, 1961, and MFA Bulletin LIX, 1962. [2] In the same sources, H. Swarzenski speculates that statue was moved from Strasbourg Cathedral during the French Revolution.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Bequest Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    22.86 x 17.78 x 16.51 cm (9 x 7 x 6 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    61.164

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; sandstone with iron deposits

    Not On View

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  • Trumpeting Angel

    French (Northeastern France)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Provenance

    1960, sold by Mrs. A. Mohr, Zurich, to the Exeter Trust, Zurich [see note 1]; 1961, sold by the Exeter Trust to the MFA for $7,160. (Accession Date: April 12, 1961) NOTE: According to the invoice from the Exeter Trust (March 22, 1961). However, in earlier correspondence to the MFA (February 20, 1961), the Exeter Trust makes clear that it functions only as the middleman in the transaction, and is not the owner of the sculpture.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    46.99 x 16.51 x 12.7 cm (18 1/2 x 6 1/2 x 5 in.)

    Accession Number

    61.196

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with traces of polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child Enthroned

    Austrian (Tyrol)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1470
    Workshop of Michael Pacher (German/Austrian, active 1462–1498)

    Object Place: Europe, Austria, Tirol

    Description

    Provenance

    Dr. Oertel, Munich; May 7, 1913, Oertel sale, Rudolph Lepke, Berlin, lot 129 [see note 1], sold for M 2000. Fischmann, Munich [see note 2]; sold by Fischmann to Dr. Siegfried Josef Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Brookline, MA; 1962, gift of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: April 11, 1962) NOTES: [1] A label affixed to the back of the sculpture says that it came from the collection of Dr. Oertel, Munich, and was sold in Berlin, May 1913, lot 129. This particular lot, which is not illustrated in the auction catalogue, measures 131 cm., while the MFA sculpture measures about 73 cm. Lot 129 does, however, match the description of the MFA sculpture, specifying identical areas of damage. No other lot in the sale matches the description of the MFA sculpture. [2] This information is taken from Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of Dr. Thannhauser's collection (February 14, 1962; in the MFA curatorial file). It may refer to the dealer Norbert Fischmann of Munich and London. The label on the back of the sculpture (as above, n. 1) indicates that Thannhauser purchased this through Helbing, Munich; whether this was at a sale of Fischmann's possessions, or Fischmann was simply the agent for the sale, is not known.

    Credit Line

    Gift of S. J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife, Franziska Reiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 99.1 x 64.8 x 40.6 cm (39 x 25 1/2 x 16 in.) Other (UHDW pad with 1/4" low density pad "Volara"): 64.8 x 35.6 cm (25 1/2 x 14 in.)

    Accession Number

    62.338

    Medium or Technique

    Pine with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Flying Angel

    German (Bavaria)
    18th century

    Object Place: Europe, Germany, Bavaria

    Description

    Wood, painted flesh-color, badly flaked. One nail of middle finger broken off, thumb on right hand glued on. Scarf from left arm over right knee and wings gold.

    Provenance

    By 1962, Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Brookline, MA; 1962, gift of Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: April 11, 1962)

    Credit Line

    Gift of S. J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife, Franziska Reiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    43.82 cm (17 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    62.339

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; Polychrome wood

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child with Angels

    German (Swabia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1490–1500
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Nuremberg, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1962, Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885- d. 1962), Brookline, Ma; 1963, bequest of Thannhauser. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    95.25 x 35.6 x 29.2 cm (37 1/2 x 14 x 11 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.583

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child Enthroned

    German (Swabia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1480
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1962, Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfired J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife, Franziska Reiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    54.6 x 27.9 x 19.1 cm (21 1/2 x 11 x 7 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.584

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Bishop Saint

    German (Southwestern) or Austria (Western)
    Gothic
    about 1510
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    This figure of a Bishop Saint is of a set with a Saint Leonard figure (63.586). Both figures were originally displayed in the center of a winged altarpiece similar to that in Oehringen which is datable around 1510 (Pinder, 1929, 406-7).

    Provenance

    Probably before 1935, purchased in Kassel, Germany by Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased in Kassel.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife, Franziska Reiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    87.6 x 26.0 x 5.2 cm (34 1/2 x 10 1/4 x 2 1/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.585

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Saint Leonard

    German (Southwestern) or Austrian (Western)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1510
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    This figure of Saint Leonard is part of a set with a Bishop Saint (63.585). Both figures were originally displayed in the center of a winged altarpiece similar to that in Oehringen which is datable around 1510.

    Provenance

    Probably before 1935, purchased in Kassel, Germany by Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased in Kassel.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife, Franziska Reiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    80.0 x 24.8 x 9.0 cm (31 1/2 x 9 3/4 x 3 9/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.586

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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