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  • Virgin and Child

    French (Soissons?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1210–25
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    This group of the Virgin and Child displays a calm serenity and stillness. The Virgin wears a crown and probably once held a scepter in her right hand, characterizing her as Queen of Heaven. With the Christ Child seated on her lap, she is also the “Throne of Wisdom”. This sculpture would have decorated an altar and similar images, painted and lavishly gilded, were known to inspire intense devotion and were sometimes thought to perform miracles. The long, smooth folds of the drapery and the elongated proportions and small heads of the figures recall sculptures that decorate the exterior of Gothic cathedrals, especially the famous cathedral of Chartres in France.

    Provenance

    Acquired in France by Joseph Mezzara (b. 1820 - d. 1901), Paris [see note 1]; by inheritance to his daughter, Mme. Marthe Ida Mezzara Dufet, Paris; 1942, sold by Mme. Dufet to Walter Bornheim (b. 1888), Cologne; taken by Bornheim to Munich for conservation and displayed at the Galerie Alte Kunst [see note 2]; 1942, exchanged by Bornheim with Dr. Otto H. Förster, General Director for Museum of the City of Cologne, for the Wallraf-Richartz Museum [see note 3]; taken to Tegernsee, near Munich [see note 4]; 1945, collected by Allied forces and returned to France [see note 5]; restituted to Mme. Dufet; 1959, sold by Mme. Dufet to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 14, 1959) NOTES: [1] According to Hanns Swarzenski, "A Vierge d'Orée," MFA Bulletin 58 (1960): 78, the sculptor Joseph Mezzara discovered the Virgin and Child while conducting conservation work in an abandoned chapel near Conflans, France. Mezzara took the sculpture to Paris around 1900. [2] Following World War II, Walter Bornheim was interrogated by the Art Looting Investigation Unit (ALIU) of the U.S. Office of Strategic Services for his activities on behalf of Hermann Göring. According to this report (September 15, 1945), Bornheim negotiated with Mme. Dufet for several months before purchasing the sculpture. He was granted an export license and took the sculpture to Munich for conservation work, first at the Doerner Institute, and, in Cologne, by Frau Brabenden. This account is corroborated by Bornheim's testimony in a letter to Hanns Swarzenski of the MFA (March 10, 1960). [3] Although Bornheim worked for Göring during the war, he claimed (ALIU report; see above, n. 2) that he had wanted the sculpture to go to a German museum rather than to Göring. Göring agreed to give up his right of first refusal. Bornheim exchanged the sculpture and a painting by Lancret with the Wallraf-Richartz Museum, Cologne, for 300,000 RM and sixteen pictures; Göring took four of these for having ceded his rights. Press accounts mistakenly claimed that Göring himself had acquired the sculpture (see, for example, Life, December 7, 1959, p. 101, and Connoisseur, May 1960, p. 212). [4] Presumably the sculpture was removed to Tegernsee by the city of Cologne for safe keeping. [5] Hans Förster claimed in a letter to Hanns Swarzenski (December 17, 1959) that the sculpture rightly belonged to the Museums of the City of Cologne, and referred to Tegernsee as its "hiding place." However, as Swarzenski stated in his response (February 9, 1960), the restitution to France was done according to Military Government regulations (Title 18, Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives) as wartime sales to German buyers in occupied countries were considered invalid. This was agreed upon by the Allies in "The Declaration of London" (January 5, 1943), reproduced in Elizabeth Simpson, ed., The Spoils of War (New York, 1997), Appendix 9, p. 287. Additional directives relevant to the sculpture's restitution are laid out in a letter from Hayden N. Smith, New York, to Andrew Ritchie, New Haven (January 8, 1960; in MFA curatorial file).

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    154.9 x 53.3 x 45.1 cm (61 x 21 x 17 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    59.701

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy and gilding

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Capital: The Life of John the Baptist

    French
    Medieval (Gothic)
    early 13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: France

    Description

    Provenance

    From the Abby Church of Saint Pons de Thomières, France. By 1908, Mme Marty [see note 1]. By 1921, with Demotte; 1921, sold by Demotte, through the Fogg Museum of Art, to the MFA. (Accession Date January 5, 1922) NOTES: [1] J. Sahuc ("L'Art roman à Saint-Pons-de Thomières," 1908) recorded this capital amongst others in the collection "chez Mme Marty," see G. Wright, in ed. D. Gillerman, "Gothic Sculpture in America," 1989, Vol. 1, p.11.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Bequest Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    38.1 x 34.3 x 32.4 cm (15 x 13 1/2 x 12 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    22.53

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; foliated marble

    Not On View

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  • Saint Malo

    French (Normandy, from Harcouët [Calvados])
    Medieval (Gothic)
    second half of 13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Place of Origin: Harcouët (Calvados), Normandy, France

    Description

    Holding a small model of a church or a reliquary in his hand, this smiling young man is Saint Malo, a sixth-century saint venerated in northern France, where a town on the Brittany coast bears his name. One tale associated with Saint Malo tells of him walking on water, which explains the representation of waves below the feet of this image. The monumentality of the figure and his lively expression give the sculpture a vivid presence.

    Provenance

    Possibly the Castle of Harcouët, Saint-Hilaire-du-Harcouët, Calvados, France [see note 1]; between 1918 and 1939, removed from Harcouët and sold in Paris to Sidney Burney, London [see note 2]; sold by Burney to John Hunt, Dublin; 1954, sold by John Hunt to the MFA for $9,835. (Accession Date: December 9, 1954) NOTES: [1] When the sculpture was acquired it was said to have come from Saint-Hilaire-du- Harcouët. Hanns Swarzenski of the MFA visited the town and was told that it had been in the castle chapel until it was shipped to Paris after World War I. See "A Masterpiece of Gothic Sculpture," MFA Bulletin 54, no. 295 (Spring 1956): 8. [2] See Swarzenski (as above, n. 1): 9.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 147.3 x 50.8 x 31.8cm (58 x 20 x 12 1/2in.) Mount (Wooden pallet / 1/4" thick "Volara" pad(bolted-3/4" brass rod)): 10.2 x 63.5 x 71.1 cm (4 x 25 x 28 in.)

    Accession Number

    54.1797

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, microsparite, from Caen

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Male Head

    French
    Medieval (Gothic)
    13th–14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1960, Mme. R. Hein, Paris [see note 1]; 1960, sold by Mme. R. Hein to the MFA for $612.60. (Accession Date: September 21, 1960) NOTES: [1] See letter, H. Swarzenski, September 21, 1960, in museum file, where a correspondence of "many years" regarding the sculpture between himself and Mme. Hein is suggested. Swarzenski believed sculpture was from Reims Cathedral, but that has been questioned by G.S. Wright in "Gothic Sculpture in America," Vol. I, The New England Museums (1989, p.18).

    Credit Line

    Helen and Alice Colburn Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    12.7 x 10.7 x 11.4 cm (5 x 4 3/16 x 4 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    60.940

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone

    Not On View

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  • Angel from an Archivolt

    French (Burgundy)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    end of 13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    Abbé Terret, Autun, France. 1931, Hans Wendland (b. 1880), Lugano and Paris; April 24-25, 1931, Wendland sale, Ball and Graupe, Berlin, lot 265. 1931, Raphael Stora, Paris; September 15, 1931, sold by Stora to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P8056); 1942, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $800. (Accession Date: November 12, 1942)

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    39.4 x 19.7 x 8.3 cm (15 1/2 x 7 3/4 x 3 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    42.493

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone with traces of recent polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Head of a Prophet

    French (Strasbourg)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1300
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Strasbourg, France

    Description

    This deeply expressive head may come from the majestic Gothic cathedral in Strasbourg. Like many other churches, this cathedral was vandalized during the French Revolution, and sculptures were removed, destroyed, or decapitated. The pointed cap and the slightly open mouth indicate that the head represents a prophet, speaking his message. The face is sensitively carved, with furrowed brow, sunken cheeks, and pensive eyes conveying a strong personality.

    Provenance

    Possibly the head of a prophet on the façade of the Strasbourg Cathedral, France [see note 1]. Robert Forrer (b. 1866 - d. 1947), Strasbourg; probably sold by Forrer to Joseph Brummer (b. 1883 - d. 1947), New York; after his death, to his brother, Ernest Brummer, New York; 1956, sold by Ernest Brummer to the MFA for $2,000. (Accession Date: October 11, 1956) NOTES: [1] See Dorothy Gillerman, Gothic Sculpture in America (New York: Garland, 1989), vol. 1, pp. 19-21, cat. no. 9. Gillerman also discusses the damage done to the cathedral in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when figures were removed.

    Credit Line

    William E. Nickerson Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    36.5 x 23.5 x 25.4 cm (14 3/8 x 9 1/4 x 10 in.)

    Accession Number

    56.506

    Medium or Technique

    Sandstone

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Virgin and Child

    French (Lorraine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1310–20
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Lorraine, France

    Description

    Provenance

    Purportedly from the Church of Saint Goery in Epinal (Les Vosges), France [see note 1]. In 1789, possibly removed from the Church of Saint Goery, Epinal [see note 2]. Mr. Daguerre, Paris. [see note 3]; by 1917, sold by Mr. Daguerre to dealer, John Vigouroux, New York [see note 4]; 1919, sold by Demotte, New York, through John Vigouroux, to the MFA for $30000. (Accession Date: February 13, 1919) NOTES: [1] According to MFA Bulletin of April 1919, and curatorial exhibition notes of 1936 written by Edwin Hipkiss. [2] According to notation by John Vigoroux on the reverse of photo-certificate of March 17, 1939, in MFA files, the piece then entered the collection of one of the late Departmental Architects of Vosges, after which it was believed to have passed through the hands of several dealers. [3] Mr. Daguerre was a painter and collector from Bourdeaux who lived in the Villa de Ternes in Paris; see letter of April 14, 1939, letter from John Vigouroux, in MFA files. [4] Letter of April 14, 1939, cited above, reveals that an associate of Vigoroux in Paris bought the statue from Mr. Daguerre; it would be shipped to Vigoroux in New York in late 1917.

    Credit Line

    Hervey Edward Wetzel Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    133.35 x 49.53 x 33.02 cm (52 1/2 x 19 1/2 x 13 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.37

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intrasparite, with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Saint Michael Weighing Souls

    French (Central France)
    Medieval
    early 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Limestone. left arm gone, scales held in right broken, claw supports lowered balance. Neck restored. From a chapel in France.

    Provenance

    Parish church of La Cellette, Creuse, France [see note 1]. Stefan von Auspitz (b. 1869 - d. 1945), Vienna; 1931, consigned to the K. W. Bachstitz Gallery, The Hague [see note 2]; December 31, 1931, sold by Bachstitz to Oscar Bondy (b. 1870 - d. 1944) and Elisabeth Bondy, Vienna [see note 3]; 1938, confiscated from Oscar and Elisabeth by Nazi forces (no. OB 1127); stored at the Central Depot, Neue Burg, Vienna and selected for the Führermuseum, Linz [see note 4]; removed to the monastery of Kremsmünster (no. Kku 397) and subsequently to Alt Aussee; July 4, 1945, recovered by Allied forces and taken to the Munich Central Collecting Point (no. 2459) [see note 5]; March 15, 1948, released to the United States Forces in Austria and restituted to Elisabeth Bondy, New York; probably sold by Mrs. Bondy to Blumka Gallery, New York [see note 6]; 1949, sold by Blumka to the MFA for $1350. (Accession Date: February 10, 1949) NOTES: [1] According to information on file at the RKD, the Hague (RKD Archief Bachstitz Gallery/Stock Book Auspitz Collection, I, no. 589, "Sculpture in Stone"). [2] Stefan von Auspitz was a banker at the Bankhaus Auspitz, Lieben & Co., Vienna. After the company declared bankruptcy in 1931 the Austrian government seized the bank and the property of its directors. Auspitz's collection of art was sold to Daniel George van Beuningen, who kept some objects for himself, selling the remainder through Kurt Bachstitz. [3] According to information on file at the RKD, the Hague (as above, n. 1). [4] With the Anschluss, or annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany in March, 1938, the possessions of Oscar and Elisabeth Bondy were seized and expropriated almost immediately by Nazi forces. This object is listed in a Nazi-generated inventory of his collection (July 4, 1938; Vienna, BDA-Archiv, Restitutions-Materialen, K 8/1), O.B. 1127: "Hl. Michael mit Wage, Steinskulptur, Kalkstein, Flügel fehlen, deutsch ? um 1300. H = 90." The Führermuseum, the art museum Adolf Hitler planned to build in Linz, Austria, was given right of first refusal over the confiscated collection. This sculpture was selected for inclusion. [5] Many works of art stored elsewhere by the Nazis were moved to the abandoned salt mines of Alt Aussee in Austria, to be kept safe from wartime bombing. Allied troops recovered the artwork at the end of World War II and established collecting points where the art could be identified for restitution to its rightful owners. This sculpture came to the Munich Central Collecting Point in 1945 from Alt Aussee (no. 1803) and was numbered 2459. The Munich Central Collecting Point inventory card is held by the National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland (Property Card 2459, National Archives Record Group 260, Box 501; and National Archives Record Group 260, Entry USACA-USFA; File Rep & Rest. Box 158). [6] Mr. Bondy and his wife left Europe and emigrated to the United States, where he passed away in 1944. In the years following World War II, much of his collection was restituted to his widow and subsequently sold on the New York art market, particularly through Blumka Gallery. For further on Oscar Bondy, see Sophie Lillie, Was einmal war: Handbuch der enteigneten Kunstsammlungen Wiens (Vienna, 2003), pp. 216-245.

    Credit Line

    Harriet Otis Cruft Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 90.8 x 31.7 x 19cm (35 3/4 x 12 1/2 x 7 1/2in.)

    Accession Number

    49.48

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intrasparite, with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child

    French
    Medieval (Late Gothic)
    14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1960, Horace L. Mayer (d. 1968) and Florence E. Mayer, Williamstown, MA; 1979, gift of Florence E. Mayer to the MFA. (Accession Date: October 17, 1979)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Horace L. Mayer

    Details

    Dimensions

    112.4 x 31.1 x 21.0 cm (44 1/4 x 12 1/4 x 8 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1979.501

    Medium or Technique

    Limestone (intrasparite) with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Education of the Virgin

    French (Ile-de-France)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    mid-14th century

    Object Place: Ile-de-France, France

    Description

    Provenance

    1958, Blumka Gallery, New York; 1958, sold by Blumka to the MFA for $1,400.00 (Accession Date: December 11, 1958)

    Credit Line

    Gift of the Class of the Museum of Fine Arts (Mrs. Arthur L.Devens Chairman)

    Details

    Dimensions

    25.9 x 24.4 x 16.2 cm (10 3/16 x 9 5/8 x 6 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    58.1191

    Medium or Technique

    Marble

    Not On View

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  • Console with a Figure with Crossed Legs

    French (Northern France or Ile-de-France)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    second half of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: France

    Description

    Provenance

    Albert Figdor (b. 1843 - d. 1927), Vienna. 1930, Arnold Seligmann Rey and Co., New York; March 11, 1930, sold by Arnold Seligmann Rey to Joseph Brummer (b. 1883 - d. 1947), New York (stock no. N2916); 1947, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $1600. (Accession Date: November 13, 1947)

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    12.7 x 14.0 x 7.9 cm (5 x 5 1/2 x 3 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1448

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Head of an Angel

    French (Rheims?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    second half of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: France

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1919, Dr. Denman W. Ross; 1919, gift of Dr. Denman W. Ross. (Accession date: September 11, 1919)

    Credit Line

    Denman Waldo Ross Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    24.1 x 26.0 x 26.7 cm (9 1/2 x 10 1/4 x 10 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.797

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Corbel with Cowled Head

    French (Eastern) or German (Middle Rhine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    second half of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    Strasbourg Cathedral [see note 1]. 1793, possibly removed from Cathedral [see note 2]. 1961, sold by Mme R. Hein, Paris, to the MFA for $1,557.50. (Accession date: March 8, 1961) NOTES: [1] See letter by H. Swarzenski, March 8, 1961, and MFA Bulletin LIX, 1962. [2] In the same sources, H. Swarzenski speculates that statue was moved from Strasbourg Cathedral during the French Revolution.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Bequest Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    22.86 x 17.78 x 16.51 cm (9 x 7 x 6 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    61.164

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; sandstone with iron deposits

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Trumpeting Angel

    French (Northeastern France)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Provenance

    1960, sold by Mrs. A. Mohr, Zurich, to the Exeter Trust, Zurich [see note 1]; 1961, sold by the Exeter Trust to the MFA for $7,160. (Accession Date: April 12, 1961) NOTE: According to the invoice from the Exeter Trust (March 22, 1961). However, in earlier correspondence to the MFA (February 20, 1961), the Exeter Trust makes clear that it functions only as the middleman in the transaction, and is not the owner of the sculpture.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    46.99 x 16.51 x 12.7 cm (18 1/2 x 6 1/2 x 5 in.)

    Accession Number

    61.196

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with traces of polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • Statue of a prophet or a saint

    French (Burgundy)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1400
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France, Burgundy

    Description

    Provenance

    Until 1926, Count and Countess de Kermaingant; November 27, 1926, sold at Kermaingant sale, American Art Galleries, New York, lot 126, to Dikran G. Kélékian, New York [see note 1]; 1939, sold by Dikran G. Kélékian to the MFA for $1000. (Accession Date: November 9, 1939) NOTES: [1] See letter from Dikran G. Kélékian to the MFA (October 16, 1939) in MFA curatorial file.

    Credit Line

    Harriet Otis Cruft Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 67.2 x 25.6 x 18.6cm (26 7/16 x 10 1/16 x 7 5/16in.)

    Accession Number

    39.760

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intrasparite

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Saint Peter as Pope

    French (Eastern) or Luxembourg (?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    third quarter of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    St. Peter was considered the first Pope because of Christ’s charge to him: “Thou are Peter and on you I found my church”. Peter is shown here in papal ceremonial dress, with the triple-crowned tiara signifying his spiritual and temporal authority. This crown and the clasp of his stole, or cope, would have originally been encrusted with jewels. St. Peter blesses with his right hand, and would once have held keys in his left hand, recalling that Christ gave him “the keys to the kingdom of heaven.” This imposing sculpture would have asserted papal authority and primacy by making clear the connections between St. Peter and the Pope.

    Provenance

    1945, Demotte, New York; October 26, 1945, sold by Demotte to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N6467); 1948, sold by the Brummer Gallery to the MFA for $7000. (Accession Date: March 11, 1948)

    Credit Line

    1948 Purchase Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 152.5 x 47 x 40.6cm (60 1/16 x 18 1/2 x 16in.) Mount (wooden pallet /UHMW pad ): 10.2 x 61 x 68.6 cm (4 x 24 x 27 in.)

    Accession Number

    48.265

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intrasparite, with traces of polychromy

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Fragment of a Corner Pier from the Tomb of John the Fearless and Margaret of Bavaria

    French (Chartreuse de Champmol, Dijon)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1443–56
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Northern, France

    Description

    Provenance

    Chartreuse de Champmol, Dijon (original commission). 1926, Henri Garnier, Lille; July 19, 1926, sold by Garnier to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P3105); January 19, 1928, sold by Brummer to Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes (b. 1867 - d. 1944), New York; July 11, 1945, sold by the Stokes estate to the Brummer Gallery (stock no. N6323); April 23, 1949, Brummer sale, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, lot 737, to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 9, 1949)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Richard B. Hobart in memory of Philip W. Hobart

    Details

    Dimensions

    23.18 x 7.6 x 9.8 cm (9 1/8 x 3 x 3 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    49.506

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster of Salins (Jura)

    Not On View

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    Europe

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    Architectural elements

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  • Pleurant

    French (Rhône Valley)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1475–1500
    Unidentified artist, French (French)

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    This figure of a monk covers his face in grief, his heavy drapery conveying the weight of his sorrow. Large sculptures of mourners decorated tombs, creating a kind of perpetual funeral procession accompanying the effigy of the deceased. This small figure may also have been part of a tomb ensemble or, more likely, was a private, commemorative work.

    Provenance

    By 1931, Bela Hein (b. 1883 - d. 1931), Paris [see note 1]; by inheritance to Mme. Bela Hein, Paris; 1967, sold by Mme. Bela Hein to the MFA. (Accession Date: Sept 13, 1967) NOTES: [1] According to a September 8, 1967 acquisition recommendation from Hanns Swarzenski, Hein acquired the sculpture in Avignon.

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    23.2 x 12.2 x 11.1 cm (9 1/8 x 4 13/16 x 4 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    67.764

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone with traces of yellow bole and polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Acolyte

    French (Central)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    first half 15th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    1927, gift of J. Templeman Coolidge. (Accession Date: September 8, 1927)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Templeman Coolidge

    Details

    Dimensions

    41.28 x 14.61 x 9.53 cm (16 1/4 x 5 3/4 x 3 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    27.453

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone with traces of polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • Mourning Virgin with Saint John from an Entombment

    French (Lorraine?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    15th century

    Object Place: Lorraine (?), France

    Description

    Provenance

    Ferdinand Roybet (b. 1840 -d. 1920), Paris; November 19, 1920, Roybet sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, lot 62 [see note 1]. 1945, Gabriel Dereppe, New York; August 14, 1945, sold by Dereppe sold to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N6345); 1946, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $8000. (Accession Date: January 10, 1946) NOTES: [1] The Mourning Virgin and Saint John were sold as part of an Entombment group, which also included a recumbent Christ, a Holy Woman, Joseph of Aramithea, and two angels. The present whereabouts of these figures is unknown.

    Credit Line

    Harriet Otis Cruft Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.5 x 30.8 x 25.4 cm (28 15/16 x 12 1/8 x 10 in.)

    Accession Number

    46.2

    Medium or Technique

    Limestone with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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    Europe

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  • Saint Barbara with her Tower

    Flemish
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1450–75
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    1912, Bacri Frères, Paris; 1912, sold by Bacri Frères to the Western Art Visiting Committee for the MFA. (Accession Date: December 5, 1912)

    Credit Line

    Gift of the Western Art Visiting Committee

    Details

    Dimensions

    62.5 x 21.9 x 16.0 cm (24 5/8 x 8 5/8 x 6 5/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    12.1174

    Medium or Technique

    Wood

    Not On View

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  • Saint Catherine of Alexandria

    French (Languedoc)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1490
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1914, J. Templeman Coolidge [see note 1]; 1917, gift of J. Templeman Coolidge. (Accession Date: February 15, 1917) NOTES: [1] In 1914, this sculpture was loaned by Coolidge to the MFA until it was made a gift.

    Credit Line

    Gift of John Templeman Coolidge

    Details

    Dimensions

    97.8 x 34.0 x 25.1 cm (38 1/2 x 13 3/8 x 9 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.348

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • Saint Barbara

    French (Alsace)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1490
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Rhineland, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    February, 1944, sold by Lewis Valentine Randall (formerly Ludwig Rosenthal, b. 1893 - d. 1972), Montreal, to Schaeffer Galleries, New York (stock no. 962); 1947, sold by Schaeffer to the MFA for $1200. (Accession date: April 10, 1947)

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated by Mrs. Charles Gaston Smith's Group

    Details

    Dimensions

    81.3 x 22.9 x 18.4 cm (32 x 9 x 7 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1020

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Female Head

    French (central France)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    second half of 15th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: France

    Description

    Provenance

    1919, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Templeman Coolidge. (Accession date: March 6, 1919)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Templeman Coolidge

    Details

    Dimensions

    24.1 x 24.1 x 15.2 cm (9 1/2 x 9 1/2 x 6 in.)

    Accession Number

    19.69

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone

    Not On View

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  • Virgin of the Annunciation

    French
    Medieval (Gothic)
    late 15th–early 16th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Toulouse, France

    Description

    Provenance

    Acquired from an unknown dealer, Ville-Franche, France by Joseph Brummer (b. 1883 - d. 1947), for the Brummer Gallery, New York [see note 1]; sold by Brummer to Elie Nadelman (b. 1882 - d. 1946), New York. 1944, Max Glückselig, New York; July 7, 1944, sold by Glückselig to the Brummer Gallery (stock no. N5997); 1945, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $3600. (Accession Date: November 8, 1945) NOTES: [1] Information about the object's provenance is taken from the Brummer inventory card and a letter from Joseph Brummer to the MFA (October 6, 1945). Brummer states "I purchased it in the city of Ville-Franche." His stock card specifies that "at one time, [it was] sold by us to Nadelman."

    Credit Line

    Helen and Alice Colburn Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    61.1 x 62.1 x 32.5 cm (24 1/16 x 24 7/16 x 12 13/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.774

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, biosparite

    Not On View

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  • Corbel of Dozing Man, "Acedia"

    English
    Medieval (Gothic)
    13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: England

    Description

    Provenance

    Acquired in London by John Hewett (b. 1919 - d. 1994), London [see note 1]. 1955, H.M. Calmann, London; 1955, sold by Calmann to the MFA for £100. (Accession Date: January 13, 1955) NOTES: [1] According to Georg Swarzenski, "A Head from Rheims and an English Corbel," MFA Bulletin 53, no. 294 (Winter, 1955), p. 73, n. 2, the corbel had been "acquired in London by John Hewett".

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    41.9 x 43.2 x 76.2 cm (16 1/2 x 17 x 30 in.)

    Accession Number

    55.9

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intramicrite

    Not On View

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  • Caryatid

    English (Lincoln?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    first half of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, England

    Description

    Part of a set with 62.670

    Provenance

    Possibly from the destroyed presbytery adjoining Lincoln Cathedral, England [see note 1]. About 1930s, with Brimo de Larousselhe, Paris; sold by Brimo de Laroussilhe to Edward Fowles (1885-1971), Paris, London and New York, NY [see note 2]; 1962, sold by Fowles to the MFA for $2,000 [see note 3]. (Accession date: September 19, 1962) NOTES: [1] As reported by Brimo de Laroussilhe, according to Fowles. See P. Kidson, and J. Cannon, Courtauld Instituted Illustration Archives, Archive I: Cathedrals and Monastic Buildings in the British Isles, Part 7: Lincoln, London, 1978, 89-96, 150-64. Also see D. Gillerman, in "Gothic Sculpture in America," 1989, p. 50. [2] Edward Fowles directed the Paris office of Duveen Brothers, Inc., from 1917 to 1938. He purchased the firm in 1939. In a letter of August 10, 1962 to Hanns Swarzenski, Fowles states that he purchased the sculptures from Brimo de Larousselhe for his private Paris residence "some thirty years ago." Fowles also notes that the sculptures "were lost during the war" but that they were later found. [3] MFA accession nos. 62.669-62.670 were purchased together for this amount.

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    137.16 x 26.0 x 25.4 cm (54 x 10 1/4 x 10 in.)

    Accession Number

    62.669

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; oak

    Not On View

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  • Caryatid

    English (Lincoln?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    first half of 14th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, England

    Description

    Part of a set with 62.669

    Provenance

    Possibly from the destroyed presbytery adjoining Lincoln Cathedral, England [see note 1]. About 1930s, with Brimo de Larousselhe, Paris; sold by Brimo de Laroussilhe to Edward Fowles (1885-1971), Paris, London and New York, NY [see note 2]; 1962, sold by Fowles to the MFA for $2,000 [see note 3]. (Accession date: September 19, 1962) NOTES: [1] As reported by Brimo de Laroussilhe, according to Fowles. See P. Kidson, and J. Cannon, Courtauld Instituted Illustration Archives, Archive I: Cathedrals and Monastic Buildings in the British Isles, Part 7: Lincoln, London, 1978, 89-96, 150-64. Also see D. Gillerman, in "Gothic Sculpture in America," 1989, p. 50. [2] Edward Fowles directed the Paris office of Duveen Brothers, Inc., from 1917 to 1938. He purchased the firm in 1939. In a letter of August 10, 1962 to Hanns Swarzenski, Fowles states that he purchased the sculptures from Brimo de Larousselhe for his private Paris residence "some thirty years ago." Fowles also notes that the sculptures "were lost during the war" but that they were later found. [3] MFA accession nos. 62.669-62.670 were purchased together for this amount.

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    135.89 x 29.2 x 25.4 cm (53 1/2 x 11 1/2 x 10 in.)

    Accession Number

    62.670

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; oak

    Not On View

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  • Bosom of Abraham Trinity

    English
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1420–50
    Unidentified artist, English, 15th century (English)

    Object Place: Europe, Nottingham, England

    Description

    This startling image combines two devotional themes-the Trinity and Souls resting in the bosom of Old Testament-patriarch Abraham. The Trinity includes God, seated and blessing with his right hand; the crucified Christ; and the Holy Spirit symbolized by the dove painted at the top of the cross. A cloth draped across God’s chest contains small figures representing souls. This image offered comfort to its viewers, including the donors of the sculpture, who kneel at God’s feet, and hold scrolls which once contained their prayers. This large and ambitious alabaster carving would have been placed above an altar.

    Provenance

    From Spain, possibly the Cathedral of Jaca, and sold in Madrid [see note 1]. By 1919, Frank Gair Macomber (b. 1849 - d. 1941), Boston; 1927, sold by Macomber to the MFA for $1500. (Accession Date: December 8, 1927) NOTES: [1] According to Walter L. Hildburgh, who was the among the foremost experts on English alabaster carvings, this sculpture was "found in Spain" and "passed through Madrid," although his sources of this information are unknown. See W. L. Hildburgh, "Iconographic Peculiarities in English Medieval Alabaster Carvings, Part I," Folk-Lore 44 (March 1933), p. 50, n. 51 and ibid., "Some Presumably Datable Fragments of an English Alabaster Retable," Antiquaries Journal 24, nos. 1-2 (January-April, 1944), pp. 36-37. The sculpture was subsequently published by Anselmo Gascón de Gotor Giménez, Nueve Catedrales en Aragón (Zaragoza: Libreria General, 1945), pl. 5, with a caption indicating it was held by the cathedral of Jaca. By the date of this publication the sculpture had long since been at the MFA, and whether it had once been at Jaca is not known.

    Credit Line

    Decorative Arts Special Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    95.9 x 38.1 x 12.7 cm (37 3/4 x 15 x 5 in.)

    Accession Number

    27.852

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polychromy and gilding

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Saint John the Baptist

    English
    Medieval (Gothic)
    15th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, England

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1916, Frank G. Macomber (b. 1849 - d. 1941), Boston [see note 1]. By 1942, J. Robert Peck; 1942, sold by Peck to the MFA for $5. (Accession Date: September 11, 1942) NOTES: [1] From May 4, 1916 through November 11, 1916, this sculpture was lent by Macomber to the MFA.

    Credit Line

    Helen and Alice Coburn Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    43.2 x 12.1 x 7.3 cm (17 x 4 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    42.396

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Mary and Joseph Adoring the Child

    English
    Medieval (Gothic)
    15th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    1929, Walter Gay (b. 1856 - d. 1937), Paris; gift of Walter Gay to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 5, 1929)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Walter Gay

    Details

    Dimensions

    31.8 x 18.4 x 3.8 cm (12 1/2 x 7 1/4 x 1 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    29.1024

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with traces of polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • The Kindred of Saint Anne (Holy Kith and Kin)

    English
    Medieval (Gothic)
    15th century
    Unidentified artist, English, 15th century (English)

    Object Place: England

    Description

    Provenance

    1929, Walter Gay (b. 1856 - d. 1937), Paris; gift of Walter Gay to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 5, 1929)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Walter Gay

    Details

    Dimensions

    38.1 x 27.9 x 4.8 cm (15 x 11 x 1 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    29.1025

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with traces of polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • Madonna and Child

    French
    Medieval (Gothic)
    mid-13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France, Mosan

    Description

    Provenance

    1912, Bacri Frères, Paris; 1912, sold by Bacri Frères to the Western Art Visiting Committee for the MFA. (Accession Date: December 5, 1912)

    Credit Line

    Gift of the Western Art Visiting Committee

    Details

    Dimensions

    80 x 30.5 x 23.5 cm (31 1/2 x 12 x 9 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    12.1173

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Head of an Angel

    Italian (Venice or Milan)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    first half of the 15th century
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    Before 1962, R. Hein and Bela Desco Hein (b. 1883 - d. 1931), Paris. By 1962, Jacques Seligmann & Co., New York. By 1969, John Goelet, New York; 1973, gift of John Goelet to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 9, 1974)

    Credit Line

    Gift of John Goelet in honor of Hanns Swarzenski

    Details

    Dimensions

    12.7 x 14 x 11.4 cm (5 x 5 1/2 x 4 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1973.693

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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  • Saint Christopher

    Netherlandish or French (?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    About 1430–50
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: The Netherlands

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1945, Arnold Seligmann, Rey & Co., Paris; 1945, sold by Seligmann, Rey & Co to the MFA for $400. (Accession date: December 13, 1945)

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    32.4 x 14.0 x 11.4 cm (12 3/4 x 5 1/2 x 4 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.840

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Saint John the Evangelist

    Southern Netherlandish (Tournai?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1440–50
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    This sculpture of Saint John, identified by the chalice he holds, was part of a larger ensemble of the four evangelists or the twelve apostles, possibly set into a small altarpiece. The exquisite carving of the hair, face, and drapery is enhanced by a delicate application of paint, creating an engaging naturalism.

    Provenance

    1950, consigned by A. M. Adler, New York, to Raphael Stora, New York; 1950, sold by Stora to the MFA for $420. (Accession Date: October 10, 1950)

    Credit Line

    H. E. Bolles Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    32.1 x 9.5 x 7.9 cm (12 5/8 x 3 3/4 x 3 1/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    50.3228

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • Annunciation group

    Southern Netherlandish
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1440–50
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Flanders

    Description

    This piece served a private, devotional purpose and was possibly part of a home altar or shrine. Alabaster is a soft stone, facilitating the carving of minute details. Here, the inclusion of a tower-like structure furnished with books adds a charming intimacy to the scene.

    Provenance

    1950, consigned by A. M. Adler, New York, to Raphael Stora, New York; 1950, sold by Stora to the MFA for $400. (Accession Date: October 10, 1950)

    Credit Line

    H. E. Bolles Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    20.32 x 19.7 x 7.6 cm (8 x 7 3/4 x 3 in.)

    Accession Number

    50.3229

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polylchromy

    Not On View

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  • Lamentation

    Southern Netherlandish (Flanders) or German (Swabia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1460
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Munich (inv. no. 415); 1959, sold by the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum to the MFA for $1000 [see note 1]. (Accession Date: January 8, 1959) NOTES: [1] According to a January 8, 1959 acquisition recommendation from Hanns Swarzenski, the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum needed funds to purchase an important Bavarian silver object from a New York dealer. By request of Swarzenski and the museum's director, Theodor Muller, the government granted the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum permission to sell duplicate objects in its collection to raise the necessary funds.

    Credit Line

    William E. (?) Nickerson Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    24.8 x 27.9 x 8.9 cm (9 3/4 x 11 x 3 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    59.176

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Figure of a Female Saint

    Southern Netherlandish (Malines)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1510–
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    This doll-like figure was set into a garden tableau, probably made for a convent. The saint’s sweet features, graceful posture, and rhythmically flowing drapery are highlighted by paint and gilding, some of which is original-a rare survival.

    Markings

    Carved in middle back of figure: \II\; circular stamp in black on bottom of base inscribed: DOUANES PAYS BAS (center of inscription illegible); adhesive sticker inscribed: 12263.1/Wickes.

    Provenance

    About 1950s, H. Blairman and Sons, London; sold by Blairman to Forsyth Wickes (b. 1876 - d. 1964), New York and Newport, RI [see note 1]; 1965, bequest of Forsyth Wickes to the MFA. (Accession Date: December 24, 1965) NOTES: [1] The exact date that Mr. Wickes purchased the sculpture is not known. According to a letter from George Levy of H. Blairman and Sons to the MFA (June 5, 1990), it may have been in the 1950s.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Forsyth Wickes—The Forsyth Wickes Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 37 x 12 x 7.5 cm (14 9/16 x 4 3/4 x 2 15/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.2230

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy and gilding; some later painting, gilding and varnish

    Not On View

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  • Saint Catherine

    Southern Netherlandish (Malines)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    About 1520–30
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Belgium

    Description

    Provenance

    1917, gift of J. Templeman Coolidge. (Accession Date: February 15, 1917)

    Credit Line

    Gift of John Templeman Coolidge, Jr.

    Details

    Dimensions

    38.7 x 14.0 x 7.0 cm (15 1/4 x 5 1/2 x 2 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.329

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • Statuette of Saint Barbara

    Southern Netherlandish or Northern French
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1520
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    Possibly Thomas Fortune Ryan (b. 1851 - d. 1928), New York [see note 1]. 1933, purchased by the MFA for $1050. (Accession Date: December 7, 1933) NOTES: [1] Thomas Fortune Ryan sale catalogue #291, as noted on MFA object card.

    Credit Line

    H. E. Bolles Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    63.5 x 25.1 x 12.4 cm (25 x 9 7/8 x 4 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    33.657

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with extensive remains of (recent) polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child

    Southern Netherlandish (Meuse)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    first quarter of 16th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: France

    Description

    Provenance

    1917, gift of J. Templeman Coolidge. (Accession Date: February 15, 1917)

    Credit Line

    Gift of John Templeman Coolidge, Jr.

    Details

    Dimensions

    54.3 x 17.9 x 14.9 cm (21 3/8 x 7 1/16 x 5 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.328

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy and gilding

    Not On View

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  • Head of A youthful Bishop

    German
    Medieval (Gothic)
    mid-13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, France

    Description

    Provenance

    Pierre Decroix, Lille. Henri Garnier, Lille. 1936, Demotte, New York; February 14, 1936, sold by Demotte to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N3789); April 23, 1949, Brummer sale, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, lot 746, to the MFA for $375. (Accession Date: May 12, 1949)

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    30.48 x 22.86 x 22.86 cm (12 x 9 x 9 in.)

    Accession Number

    49.473

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, pelsparite

    Not On View

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  • Pietà

    German (Upper Rhine or Swabia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1375–90
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Upper Rhine, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    A chapel in Glottertal (near Freiburg), Germany (?). Before 1935, Professor Geiges (possibly Fritz Geiges, b. 1853 - d. 1935), Freiburg, Germany [see note 1]; sold by Geiges to Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased from Professor Geiges in Freiburg, and came from "the chapel in Glottertal."

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    88.9 x 34.9 x 24.8 cm (35 x 13 3/4 x 9 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.590

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Seated Christ or Apostle

    German (Middle Rhine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1420
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Middle Rhine, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1940, Martha (Mrs. Ernest M.) Heiden, New Rochelle, NY; September 10, 1943, sold by Mrs. Heiden to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N5560). 1960, Dr. Eugen Grabscheid, New York; 1960, gift of Grabscheid to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 14, 1960)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Dr. Eugen Grabscheid

    Details

    Dimensions

    63.5 x 18.41 x 18.41 cm (25 x 7 1/4 x 7 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    60.16

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Christ Child

    German (Upper Rhine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1430
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Alsace, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1921, Harry Fuld (b. 1879 - d. 1932), Frankfurt [see note 1]; by inheritance to his widow, Ida Maria Felsmann Fuld (b. 1884 - d. 1975), Frankfurt and London; consigned by Mrs. Fuld, through Wilhelm Henrich, Frankfurt, to Rosenberg and Stiebel, New York; 1970, sold by Rosenberg and Stiebel to the MFA [see note 2]. (Accession Date: January 14, 1970) NOTES: [1] It was first published by Georg Swarzenski, "Deutsche Alabasterplastik des 15. Jahrhunderts," Städel-Jahrbuch 1 (1921): 195, fig. 141. [2] Hanns Swarzenski of the MFA recommended the sculpture for purchase (January 14, 1970), writing: "Mrs. Fuld recently gave the figure on commission to Saemy Rosenberg in New York."

    Credit Line

    Harriet Otis Cruft Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    21.9 x 11.43 x 6.0 cm (8 5/8 x 4 1/2 x 2 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    1970.10

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; polychrome alabaster

    Not On View

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  • Annunciation

    German (Upper Rhine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1440

    Object Place: Upper Rhine, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    Church of Maria Hof, Neidingen (today Neudingen), Germany [see note 1]. By 1923, Hugo Benario, Berlin [see note 2]. 1926 (?), art market, Lübeck, Germany [see note 3]. 1926, Béla Hein (b. 1883 - d. 1931), Paris; July 31, 1928, sold by Hein to Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P5010); May 7, 1929, sold by Brummer to H. M. Tovell; December 23, 1929, returned by Tovell to Brummer for credit; February 14, 1930, sold by Brummer to Kleinberger Galleries; May 6, 1931, returned by Kleinberger to Brummer for credit; 1943, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $1,200. (Accession Date: January 14, 1943) NOTES: [1] Georg Swarzenski, "A Gothic Alabaster Annunciation," MFA Bulletin, 41 (June 1943), p. 12. This information is also found in notes in the curatorial file. [2] W. F. Volbach, Die Mittelalterlichen Bildwerke der Sammlung Benario (Berlin, 1923), p. 10, cat. no. 12, pl. XIV. [3] The information about the Lübeck art market and Béla Hein is taken from annotations on the reverse of photographs of the object (in MFA curatorial file).

    Credit Line

    Helen and Alice Colburn Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 31.8 x 21.0 x 6.4 cm (12 1/2 x 8 1/4 x 2 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    43.3

    Medium or Technique

    Alabaster with touches of polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Sleeping Saint John

    German (Bavaria)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1450
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany, Bavaria

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1962, Dr. Kurt Rossacher (b. 1918 - d. 1988), Salzburg, Austria; 1962, sold by Rossacher to the MFA for $1,000. (Accession date: November 14, 1962)

    Credit Line

    H. E. Bolles Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    35.6 x 34.9 x 33.0 cm (14 x 13 3/4 x 13 in.)

    Accession Number

    62.983

    Medium or Technique

    Terracotta with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Saint Sebastian

    German (Upper Rhine)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1470
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Germany, Upper Rhine

    Description

    Saint Sebastian was an early Christian martyr tortured at the order of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Because Sebastian was shot with arrows but survived, he was later invoked as a protector against plague. In this sculpture, which once decorated an altar, Sebastian is represented in an almost dance-like pose. His placid expression as he confronts pain and suffering would have offered comfort and hope. The arrows that once pierced his flesh are now missing.

    Provenance

    Art market, Molsheim, France; by 1934, acquired in Molsheim by Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Freiburg, Munich and Brookline, MA [see note 1]; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] The sculpture was certainly in Dr. Thannhauser's possession by 1934, when he lent it to the exhibition "Mittelalterliche Plastik" (Kunsthalle, Basel, February - April, 1934), cat. no. 55. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased from a dealer in Molsheim, Alsace. Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    99.69 x 41.9 x 29.8 cm (39 1/4 x 16 1/2 x 11 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.589

    Medium or Technique

    Polychrome wood

    Not On View

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  • Trumpeting Angel

    German (Upper Rhineland, probably Offenburg)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1475–1500
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Rhineland/Meuse/North Germany, Germany

    Description

    This trumpeting angel is a boss, a block that marked the intersection of rib vaults on the ceiling of a Gothic church. Decorative bosses were common features of German architecture, especially from the thirteenth century onwards. Imagery of music was popular in church interiors, reflecting both the music of religious ceremonies and the belief in music’s close association with heaven.

    Markings

    Mason's mark on back???

    Provenance

    Possibly from a church in Offenburg, Germany [see note 1]. 1927, Hugo Benario, Berlin; April 5, 1927, Benario sale, Lepke, Berlin, lot 101. Carl von Weinberg (b. 1861 - d. 1943), Frankfurt [see note 2]. By 1956, Wilhelm Henrich (d. 1980), Frankfurt; 1956, sold by Henrich to the MFA for $596.50. (Accession Date: December 13, 1956) NOTES: [1] According to Hanns Swarzenski's curatorial recommendation for the object's purchase (December 13, 1956). [2] In 1938 Carl von Weinberg was forced to sell his entire art collection and his home to the city of Frankfurt for its museums. In 1939 he fled Nazi Germany and emigrated to Italy, where he died in 1943. In 1945/46 Allied forces recovered from Frankfurt museums the objects that had been sold under duress. Carl von Weinberg's property was restituted in 1950 to his son-in-law, Richard von Szilvinyi (d. 1966), who consigned much of it to the dealer Wilhelm Henrich for sale. At the time of its acquisition, this sculpture was said to have come from the Weinberg collection, which suggests that it was among the objects restituted and consigned to Henrich. However, it has not been identified in the list of 208 sculptures seized in 1938 from Weinberg, which went to the Stadtische Galerie, Frankfurt, and were returned.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    40.6 x 38.13 x 39.4 cm (16 x 15 x 15 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    56.1182

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; painted sandstone

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child Enthroned

    German (Swabia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1480
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1962, Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfired J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife, Franziska Reiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    54.6 x 27.9 x 19.1 cm (21 1/2 x 11 x 7 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.584

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Christ or Apostle

    German (Lower Swabia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1490
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    Probably before 1935, Detlinger, Freiburg, Germany [see note 1]; sold by Detlinger to Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased from Detlinger, Freiburg-im-Breisgau.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    88.9 x 26.0 x 20.0 cm (35 x 10 1/4 x 7 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.587

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child with Angels

    German (Swabia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1490–1500
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Nuremberg, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1962, Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885- d. 1962), Brookline, Ma; 1963, bequest of Thannhauser. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963)

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    95.25 x 35.6 x 29.2 cm (37 1/2 x 14 x 11 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.583

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child

    German
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1490–95
    Tilman Riemenschneider (German, 1460–1531)

    Object Place: Europe, Wurzburg, Germany

    Description

    This Virgin wears a crown and stands upon a crescent moon, which associates her with the Woman of the Apocalypse from the Bible’s Book of Revelation. Riemenschneider presents the figures with great simplicity and humanity-the Virgin seems slightly melancholy and the Christ Child about to smile. Particularly touching is the way the Virgin holds one of her son’s feet while he clasps the other.

    Provenance

    Felix M. Warburg (b. 1871 - d. 1937), New York; by inheritance to his widow, Frieda Schiff Warburg (b. 1876 - d. 1958), New York; 1941, gift of Frieda Schiff Warburg to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 11, 1941)

    Credit Line

    Gift in memory of Felix M. Warburg by his wife Frieda Schiff Warburg

    Details

    Dimensions

    120.7 x 38.1 x 20.2 cm (47 1/2 x 15 x 7 15/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    41.653

    Medium or Technique

    Limewood

    On View

    William A. Coolidge Gallery (Gallery 243A)

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  • Saint John

    German (Franconia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1500
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Part of Crucifixion Group set with Virgin (45.839).

    Provenance

    Dr. Albert Figdor (b. 1843 - d. 1927), Vienna; September 29-30, 1930, posthumous Figdor sale, Paul Cassirer, Berlin, lot 203, sold for M 3,200. 1945, Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co., New York; 1945, sold by Seligmann Rey and Co. to the MFA for $900 [see note 1]. (Accession Date: December 13, 1945) NOTES: [1] MFA accession numbers 45.838 - 45.839 acquired together.

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    19.05 cm (7 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.838

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Virgin

    German (Franconia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1500
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Nuremberg, Germany

    Description

    Part of Crucifixion Group set with Saint John (45.838).

    Provenance

    Dr. Albert Figdor (b. 1843 - d. 1927), Vienna; September 29-30, 1930, posthumous Figdor sale, Paul Cassirer, Berlin, lot 203, sold for M 3,200. 1945, Arnold Seligmann, Rey and Co., New York; 1945, sold by Seligmann Rey and Co. to the MFA for $900 [see note 1]. (Accession Date: December 13, 1945) NOTES: [1] MFA accession numbers 45.838 - 45.839 acquired together.

    Credit Line

    Otis Norcross Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    18.41 x 6.0 x 4.1 cm (7 1/4 x 2 3/8 x 1 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.839

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Bishop Saint

    German (Southwestern) or Austria (Western)
    Gothic
    about 1510
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    This figure of a Bishop Saint is of a set with a Saint Leonard figure (63.586). Both figures were originally displayed in the center of a winged altarpiece similar to that in Oehringen which is datable around 1510 (Pinder, 1929, 406-7).

    Provenance

    Probably before 1935, purchased in Kassel, Germany by Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased in Kassel.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife, Franziska Reiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    87.6 x 26.0 x 5.2 cm (34 1/2 x 10 1/4 x 2 1/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.585

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Saint Leonard

    German (Southwestern) or Austrian (Western)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1510
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    This figure of Saint Leonard is part of a set with a Bishop Saint (63.585). Both figures were originally displayed in the center of a winged altarpiece similar to that in Oehringen which is datable around 1510.

    Provenance

    Probably before 1935, purchased in Kassel, Germany by Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased in Kassel.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife, Franziska Reiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    80.0 x 24.8 x 9.0 cm (31 1/2 x 9 3/4 x 3 9/16 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.586

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Female Saint, Saint Barbara (?)

    German
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1520

    Object Place: Landshut, Lower Bavaria, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    Probably before 1935, acquired in Munich by Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA [see note 1]; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased in Munich.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    109.22 x 40.0 x 27.9 cm (43 x 15 3/4 x 11 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.588

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Figure of Saint Barbara

    German (Lower Bavaria)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1520
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Regensburg, Germany

    Description

    Provenance

    Acquired from I. and S. Goldschmidt, Frankfurt, by Otto H. Kahn (b. 1867 - d. 1934), New York; 1934, to the Mogmar Art Foundation, New York [see note 1] and consigned to Duveen Brothers, New York; 1945, sold by Duveen to the MFA for $1200 [see note 2]. (Accession Date: May 10, 1945) NOTES: [1] That this sculpture was acquired from Goldschmidt is according to an inventory of the Mogmar Art Foundation (June 26, 1934) on file at the Getty Research Institute (Duveen Brothers Records, Box 472), cat. no. MAF 33. The Mogmar Art Foundation was a private corporation that kept parts of Kahn's art collection after his death. Pieces from the collection were stored with Duveen, New York, beginning in June, 1934.

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds donated by Mrs. Charles Gaston Smith's Group

    Details

    Dimensions

    83.18 x 22.9 x 21.0 cm (32 3/4 x 9 x 8 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    45.474

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Saint John from a Crucifixion Group

    Austrian (Tyrol)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1300
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Provenance

    Probably before 1935, acquired in Freiburg, Germany by Siegfried J. Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Munich and Brookline, MA; 1963, bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 8, 1963) NOTES: [1] Dr. Thannhauser immigrated to the Boston area in 1935. According to Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of his collection (February 14, 1962), this sculpture was purchased from a dealer in Freiburg.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife Franziska Peiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    72.39 x 20.0 x 12.4 cm (28 1/2 x 7 7/8 x 4 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.593

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Lamentation

    Austrian (Salzburg)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1415
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Austria

    Description

    Provenance

    By 1959, acquired in Paris by Count Ernst Otto von Solms-Laubach (b. 1890 - d. 1977), Frankfurt [see note 1]; 1961, sold by Solms-Laubach, through Wilhelm Henrich, Frankfurt, to the MFA for $5,000. (Accession Date: January 11, 1961) NOTES: [1] Hanns Swarzenski, "Eine Beweinungsgruppe des weichen Stils in Boston," in Studien zur Geschichte der europäischen Plastik. Festschrift Theodor Müller (Munich, 1965), p. 113, noted that Solms-Laubach bought the sculpture on the Paris art market and took it to Frankfurt. Discussion between Solms-Laubach and the MFA regarding its sale began in 1959.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Bequest Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    27.94 x 57.2 x 20.3 cm (11 x 22 1/2 x 8 in.)

    Accession Number

    61.158

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, biosparite, with traces of polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child on a Lion

    Austrian (Styria)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1415
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Germany or Austria

    Description

    Provenance

    1913, Max Guggenheimer; May 19-21, 1913, Guggenheimer sale, Helbing, Munich, lot 569. 1928, Satori, Vienna; September 10, 1928, sold by Satori to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P5510); May 13, 1949, Brummer sale, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, lot 594, to the MFA for $500. (Accession Date: May 12, 1949)

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    125.7 x 35 x 30.5 cm (49 1/2 x 13 3/4 x 12 in.)

    Accession Number

    49.485

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Virgin and Child on the Crescent Moon

    Austrian
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1440–50
    Unidentified artist

    Place of Origin: Austria

    Description

    The swaying curve of the body of the Virgin, animated by deeply carved rhythmic folds, gives to this sculpture a sense of lyricism and weightiness characteristic of later Gothic sculpture in Northern Europe. The sweetness of expression of both mother and child makes the sculpture extremely vivid and appealing to the viewer. Wearing a crown and standing upon the crescent moon with a face below, this warmly human image also has symbolic meanings, associating the Virgin with the biblical Woman of the Apocalypse.

    Provenance

    15th century until 1797, parish church of Krenstetten, Austria [see note 1]. 1965, Wolfgang Hofstätter, Vienna; 1965, sold by Wolfgang Hofstätter to the MFA. (Accession Date: November 10, 1965) NOTES: [1] According to Wolfgang Hofstätter (letter to Hanns Swarzenski, MFA, September 23, 1965), this was the central sculpture of an altarpiece at the parish church of Krenstetten. When the church burned in 1797, the Madonna was salvaged and removed to a nearby building, where it was rediscovered after World War II.

    Credit Line

    Centennial Purchase Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    176.5 x 55.9 x 30.5 cm (69 1/2 x 22 x 12 in.)

    Accession Number

    65.1354

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; poplar with polychromy

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Virgin and Child Enthroned

    Austrian (Tyrol)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1470

    Object Place: Tirol, Austria

    Description

    Provenance

    Dr. Oertel, Munich; May 7, 1913, Oertel sale, Rudolph Lepke, Berlin, lot 129 [see note 1], sold for M 2000. Fischmann, Munich [see note 2]; sold by Fischmann to Dr. Siegfried Josef Thannhauser (b. 1885 - d. 1962), Brookline, MA; 1962, gift of Dr. Siegfried J. Thannhauser to the MFA. (Accession Date: April 11, 1962) NOTES: [1] A label affixed to the back of the sculpture says that it came from the collection of Dr. Oertel, Munich, and was sold in Berlin, May 1913, lot 129. This particular lot, which is not illustrated in the auction catalogue, measures 131 cm., while the MFA sculpture measures about 73 cm. Lot 129 does, however, match the description of the MFA sculpture, specifying identical areas of damage. No other lot in the sale matches the description of the MFA sculpture. [2] This information is taken from Edward R. Lubin's appraisal of Dr. Thannhauser's collection (February 14, 1962; in the MFA curatorial file). It may refer to the dealer Norbert Fischmann of Munich and London. The label on the back of the sculpture (as above, n. 1) indicates that Thannhauser purchased this through Helbing, Munich; whether this was at a sale of Fischmann's possessions, or Fischmann was simply the agent for the sale, is not known.

    Credit Line

    Gift of S. J. Thannhauser in memory of his wife, Franziska Reiner Thannhauser

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 99.1 x 64.8 x 40.6 cm (39 x 25 1/2 x 16 in.) Other (UHDW pad with 1/4" low density pad "Volara"): 64.8 x 35.6 cm (25 1/2 x 14 in.)

    Accession Number

    62.338

    Medium or Technique

    Pine with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Crucifix

    Austrian
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1515
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Austria

    Description

    Corpus with three rays.

    Provenance

    Until about mid-20th century, a chapel near the parish church of Freinberg, Austria [see note 1]. Unknown collector or dealer [see note 2]. By 1971, Hofgalerie, Vienna; 1972, sold by the Hofgalerie to the MFA. (Accession Date: October 11, 1972) NOTES: [1] According to a note provided by Wolfgang Hofstätter of the Hofgalerie to Hanns Swarzenski of the MFA (undated). The chapel is said to have been torn down "several decades ago." The note hypothesizes that the sculpture originally came from either the Freinberg church, the nearby church at Esternberg, or Passau. [2] According to the note provided by Hofstätter (see above, n. 1), after the chapel was torn down, the sculpture was purchased by its previous owner.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    197.8 x 200.0 x 44.5 cm (77 7/8 x 78 3/4 x 17 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    1972.916.1

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Head of Frederic II of Hohenstaufen (?)

    Italian (Capua?)
    Medieval
    about 1230 (?)
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Europe, Capua, Italy

    Description

    Provenance

    Said to have come from a private collection, Switzerland [see note 1]. By 1971, Benjamin Rowland, Jr., Cambridge, MA and Brooklin, ME; 1974, bequest of Benjamin Rowland, Jr. to the MFA. (Accession Date: February 13, 1974) NOTES: [1] According to Benjamin Rowland, "A New Portrait Head of Frederick II Hohenstaufen," Pantheon 31, no. 4 (1973), p. 351, this head "was for many years in a private collection in Switzerland and, according to the last owner, was found in Campania in the vicinity of Naples long before the discovery of the known portraits of Frederick [II]." This account has never been verified.

    Credit Line

    Bequest of Benjamin Rowland, Jr.

    Details

    Dimensions

    41.9 x 23.5 x 22.2 cm (16 1/2 x 9 1/4 x 8 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    1974.132

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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  • Caryatid group of a deacon and two acolytes

    Italian (Bologna)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1265–68
    Attributed to Arnolfo di Cambio (Italian)

    Description

    These three clerics hold objects used during celebration of the Mass. A deacon-distinguished by his stole and the maniple (a strip of silk worn at Mass) that drapes from his wrist-carries the pillow that supports the missal containing the text of the Mass. The acolytes hold a pitcher for the water or wine and the pyx, a container for the Eucharist. The group was a supporting element for the tomb of Saint Dominic in the church of the same name in Bologna. Arnolfo di Cambio created this sculpture in the shop of his master, Giovanni Pisano; he later became a master sculptor and architect, providing the initial designs for the cathedral in Florence and sculptures for its facade. (MCambareri, 2W02, 2004).

    Provenance

    About 1265/1268, Arca di San Domenico, Bologna (original commission). Publio Podio, Bologna [see note 1]. 1929, Enrico Testa; August 16, 1929, sold by Testa to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. P6466); 1947, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $45,000. (Accession Date: June 12, 1947) NOTES: [1] Cesare Gnudi, "Nicola, Arnolfo, [e] Lapo" (Florence, 1948), p. 101.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    102.9 x 29.2 x 21.0 cm (40 1/2 x 11 1/2 x 8 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1290

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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    Silver-gilt

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  • Crowned Head

    Italian
    Medieval (Gothic)
    late 13th century
    Follower of Nicola Pisano (Italian (Tuscany), about 1220/25–before 1284)

    Object Place: Europe, Italy

    Description

    This small head probably came from a relief panel with a scene such as that of the three kings worshiping the infant Jesus. A softer stone than marble, alabaster allows for intricate, delicate carving on a small scale. The sculptor used a drill to create the curls in the hair and beard of this figure, and he carved the eyes and mouth with great subtlety to achieve an animated expression.

    Provenance

    13th century, made as part of an unidentified sculptural ensemble [see note 1]. 1936, Jacques Cohen, New York; April 22, 1936, sold by Cohen to Joseph Brummer (b. 1883 - d. 1947), New York (stock no. N3889); 1947, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $1200. (Accession Date: November 13, 1947) NOTES: [1] The origins of the MFA Crowned Head, evidently removed from a larger ensemble, remain unclear. Christine Verzar and Charles T. Little have noted that it is "the same size and style of the body of a now-headless king on the lintel by Nicola Pisano at the cathedral of Lucca." However, this has not been verified. See their essay, "Gothic Italy: Reflections of Antiquity," in Set in Stone: The Face in Medieval Sculpture (exh. cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 2007), 150, n. 2.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    10.48 x 7.6 x 9.5 cm (4 1/8 x 3 x 3 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1446

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster

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    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Madonna and Child

    Italian (Tuscany)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    early 14th century
    Follower of Giovanni Pisano (Italian (Tuscany), about 1245/50–1319)

    Description

    Although the heads of both figures are missing, this work displays the powerful presence of fourteenth-century Italian sculpture in the skillful carving, the secure stance of the Madonna, and the graceful patterns of the drapery. The work is very similar to a Madonna and Child, now in Genoa, by Giovanni Pisano, among the foremost sculptors of this period. The small scale of the sculpture indicates that it was once either part of a larger ensemble or a private devotional image.

    Provenance

    Charles Callahan Perkins, Boston; By inheritance to Charles Callahan Perkins' wife, Mrs. C.C. (Francis D.) Perkins; 1895, gift of Mrs. C.C. Perkins (Accession Date: December 10, 1895)

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. C. C. Perkins

    Details

    Dimensions

    47.62 x 14.6 x 15.87 cm (18 3/4 x 5 3/4 x 6 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    95.1383

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

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    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Head of a Saint or Prophet

    Italian (Florence)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1320–25
    Attributed to Tino di Camaino (Italian, about 1280–1337)

    Description

    This head has recently been attributed to Tino di Camaino, a sculptor who worked in Siena, Florence, and Naples. It may be a fragment of a monumental sculpture that was once placed over a door to the baptistery in Florence. Although the nose is broken off, the fine working of the face and the deep drilling of the beard emphatically capture the character and expression of the figure, which would have been clearly legible to onlookers on the street below.

    Provenance

    By 1938, Edouard Larcade, St. Germain-en-Laye, France [see note 1]; July 23, 1938, sold by Larcade to Joseph Brummer (b. 1883 - d. 1947), New York (stock no. P15031); 1947, sold by Joseph Brummer to the MFA for $7800. (Accession Date: November 13, 1947) NOTES: [1] Speculations that this piece originally came either from Pisa (as noted on the reverse of an MFA photograph in the MFA curatorial file) or from the Florentine Baptistery (as suggested by Hanns Swarzenski) remain undocumented. See Anita Fiderer Moskowitz's comments in Dorothy Gillerman, ed., "Gothic Sculpture in America," vol. 1, "The New England Museums" (New York and London: Garland, 1989), p. 99, cat. no. 71.

    Credit Line

    Charles Amos Cummings Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    33.0 x 24.1 x 27.9 cm (13 x 9 1/2 x 11 in.)

    Accession Number

    47.1447

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Virgin of the Annunciation

    Italian (Siena)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1330
    Workshop of Goro di Gregorio (Italian)

    Object Place: Siena, Italy

    Description

    Provenance

    1910, Ludwig von Buerkel (b. 1877 - d. 1946), Florence; October 29, 1910, Buerkel sale, Helbing, Munich, lot 4 [see note 1]. Adolf von Beckerath (b. 1834 - d. 1915), Berlin; May 23-26, 1916, Beckerath estate sale, Lepke, Berlin, lot 16, unsold; November 20-21, 1916, Beckerath estate sale, Lepke, Berlin, lot 156 [see note 2]. February 24-25, 1920, anonymous sale, Lepke, Berlin, lot 462. By 1938, Eugene L. Garbáty (b. 1880 - d. 1966), Schloss Alt-Döbern, Niederlausitz (Germany), New York, and East Norwalk, CT [see note 3]; 1946, gift of Eugene L. Garbáty to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 12, 1946) NOTES: [1] Attributed in the catalogue to the Master of the Madonna della Spina at Pisa. [2] Attributed in the Beckerath catalogues to Giovanni Pisano. [3] Eugene Garbáty emigrated from Berlin to New York between 1938 and 1939, bringing much of his art collection with him.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Eugene L. Garbáty

    Details

    Dimensions

    64.1 x 13.97 x 22.86 cm (25 1/4 x 5 1/2 x 9 in.)

    Accession Number

    46.843

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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  • Bearded Prophet or Apostle

    Italian (Pisa?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    mid-14th century
    Follower of Giovanni Pisano (Italian (Tuscany), about 1245/50–1319)

    Object Place: Tuscany, Italy

    Description

    Provenance

    Private collection, France (?) [see note 1]. 1963, Mario Barsanti, Rome; 1963, sold by Barsanti to the MFA for $26,000. (Accession Date: December 11, 1963) NOTES: [1] According to information provided by Barsanti at the time of the sculpture's acquisition, it had been in a private collection on the French Riviera.

    Credit Line

    William Francis Warden Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    137.8 x 31.8 x 24.8 cm (54 1/4 x 12 1/2 x 9 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    63.2665

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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  • Madonna and Child

    Italian
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1325–75
    Follower of Tino di Camaino (Italian, about 1280–1337)

    Description

    Provenance

    1926, purchased by the MFA for $5022.47. (Accession date: September 9, 1926)

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 57.8 x 21 x 20.3 cm (22 3/4 x 8 1/4 x 8 in.)

    Accession Number

    26.162

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; marble

    Not On View

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  • Apostle

    Spanish (Farrera, Catalonia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    early 13th century
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Spain

    Description

    Part of the Farrera Frontal.

    Provenance

    Part of an altar frontal from a church in Farrera, Lerida, Catalonia, Spain [see note 1]. Altar frontal with C. Dupont, dealer, Barcelona, Spain. By about 1919, with Olaguer Junyent [see note 2]; sold by Junyent to Luis Plandiura; sold by Planidura to Joaquin Cabrejo, dealer, Madrid, Spain; 1921, sold by Cabrejo to Herbert Weissberger, New York, NY; 1921, the altar frontal and the 4 standing figures, including this present figure, offered for sale by Weissberger at Almoneda Collection sale, American Art Association, lot 573, but bought in. By 1928, with Seligman, Rey and Company, New York, NY; 1928, sold by Seligman, Rey and Company to Frank Gair Macomber, Palm Beach, FL; 1933, gift of Frank Gair Macomber to the MFA. (Accession date: November 2, 1933) NOTES: [1] See D. Gillerman, ed., "Gothic Sculpture in America," Vol. 1, 1989, p. 103-104 and Walter W.S. Cook, "Lost Spanish Altar Frontals," Gazette des Beaux Arts, October 1956. [2] Between 1919-1921, this figure was removed from the altar frontal.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Frank Gair Macomber

    Details

    Dimensions

    31.8 x 7.0 x 4.8 cm (12 1/2 x 2 3/4 x 1 7/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    33.642

    Medium or Technique

    Wood with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Saint John

    Spanish (Old Castille, Burgos?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    1280–90
    Unidentified artist

    Object Place: Italy

    Description

    Provenance

    Private collection, Chateau d'Arbus, near Pau, France [see note 1]. Art market, France (?) [see note 2]. Possibly with Neumeister, Munich; possibly sold by Neumeister to the Hofgalerie, Vienna; 1967, sold by the Hofgalerie to the MFA. (Accession Date: September 13, 1967) NOTES: [1] According to a letter from Wolfgang Hofstätter, Hofgalerie, to Hanns Swarzenski of the MFA (December 18, 1967). [2] Notes in the curatorial file (October, 1982) indicate that Hanns Swarzenski recalled that the Hofgalerie had acquired this sculpture from Neumeister, Munich; before then it had been with an unknown French dealer. This has not been verified. Wolfgang Hofstätter first mentioned the sculpture in correspondence to the MFA on October 7, 1966.

    Credit Line

    Centennial Purchase Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    162.6 x 45.1 x 34.3 cm (64 x 17 3/4 x 13 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    67.767

    Medium or Technique

    Wood; lindenwood with polychromy

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  • Retable of the Virgin

    Spanish (Anglesola, Lérida)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1320
    Unidentified artist, Spanish, 14th century

    Description

    Provenance

    About 1320, the Church of Anglesola, Lérida, Spain (original commission); 1907, removed from the church and taken to Barcelona by Francisco Llorens, Barcelona [see note 1]; sold by Llorens to the Lowengard family, Paris [see note 2]; March 3, 1911, Lowengard sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 113, unsold; subsequently taken to the United States by the Lowengard family and sold. 1924, George Grey Barnard (b. 1863 - d. 1938), New York [see note 3]; 1924, sold by Barnard to the MFA for $65,000. (Accession Date: April 3, 1924) NOTES: [1] In a letter to Edward J. Holmes of the MFA (July 27, 1926), Joseph Pijoan, at that time a visiting professor at Harvard University, indicated that the retable had come from Anglesola, and that it had been taken to Barcelona in 1907 "by a carpenter...whom we used to call Francisquet, or 'little Francis'. He had his shop on the street of Carrer de la Palla and he offered your altar to the Barcelona museum...at this time I was a member of the commission in charge of the museum and I was appointed with three others to examine the stone at Francisquet's shop." Also see Pijoan's article, "L'altar d'Anglesola al Museu de Boston," Gaseta de les Arts 3, no. 57 (September 15, 1926), p. 1. [2] The provenance of the retable is further discussed by Paul Tachard, "A propósito del retablo de Piedra de Anglesola," Gaseta de les Arts 3, no. 59 (October 15, 1926), pp. 3-5. [3] When Barnard offered the retable to the MFA, he claimed that it was "found on a farm near Pau, evidently from the King's Chapel at Pau, but buried during the Revolution. ... I came in possession of this treasure many years ago but the French Government ... held it for eight years intending to place it, so I am told, in the Louvre, only through my excellent relations and as owner it was recently released...and sent to me." (Letter to the MFA, February 23, 1924.) Barnard's fabricated account of the retable's origins was undoubtedly intended to increase its rarity and artistic value.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mrs. Walter Scott Fitz, Edward Jackson Holmes, John Nicholas Brown and Purchase: Marie Antoinette Evans Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 106.7 x 245.1 x 19.7 cm, 907.2 kg (42 x 96 1/2 x 7 3/4 in., 2000 lb.) Framed (Steel channel armature L-frame): 109.2 x 205.7 x 17.8 cm (43 x 81 x 7 in.)

    Accession Number

    24.149

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; limestone, intramicrite

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  • Panel from a Tomb

    Spanish (Catalonia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1350–70
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Part of a set with two other panels (66.385, 66.386).

    Provenance

    Possibly from a royal tomb, monastery church at Poblet, near Barcelona, Spain (original commission) [see note 1]. By 1923, Jacques Seligmann et Fils, Paris; April 20, 1926, sold by Seligmann to Myron C. Taylor (b. 1874 - d. 1959), New York; November 11-12, 1960, Taylor estate sale, Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, lot 898. Possibly with Blumka Gallery, New York [see note 2]. By 1966, Jack Linsky (b. 1897 - d. 1980), New York; 1966, gift of Jack Linsky to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 1, 1966) NOTES: [1] Mildred Stapley Byne wrote about the reliefs to Seligmann (November 23, 1923): "I should say that your frieze was the side slab of one of the royal tombs in Poblet, as the few which remain in the transept and nave of the church are very similar." The letter indicates Mrs. Byne's familiarity with the pieces, but does not suggest the name of a previous owner. When they were accessioned in 1966, the reliefs were believed to have come from the tomb of Pedro VI de Queralt in the sanctuary of Belloch de Santa Coloma de Queralt. [2] Blumka was consulted about the reliefs when they were acquired and appraised them. It is not clear whether the gallery had owned them, or was simply called in for advice.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Jack Linsky

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.0 x 46.0 x 6.7 cm (28 3/4 x 18 1/8 x 2 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    66.384

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster, blue glass, and parcel gilding

    Not On View

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  • Panel from a Tomb

    Spanish (Catalonia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1350–70
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Part of a set with two other panels (66.384, 66.386).

    Provenance

    Possibly from a royal tomb, monastery church at Poblet, near Barcelona, Spain (original commission) [see note 1]. By 1923, Jacques Seligmann et Fils, Paris; April 20, 1926, sold by Seligmann to Myron C. Taylor (b. 1874 - d. 1959), New York; November 11-12, 1960, Taylor estate sale, Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, lot 898. Possibly with Blumka Gallery, New York [see note 2]. By 1966, Jack Linsky (b. 1897 - d. 1980), New York; 1966, gift of Jack Linsky to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 1, 1966) NOTES: [1] Mildred Stapley Byne wrote about the reliefs to Seligmann (November 23, 1923): "I should say that your frieze was the side slab of one of the royal tombs in Poblet, as the few which remain in the transept and nave of the church are very similar." The letter indicates Mrs. Byne's familiarity with the pieces, but does not suggest the name of a previous owner. When they were accessioned in 1966, the reliefs were believed to have come from the tomb of Pedro VI de Queralt in the sanctuary of Belloch de Santa Coloma de Queralt. [2] Blumka was consulted about the reliefs when they were acquired and appraised them. It is not clear whether the gallery had owned them, or was simply called in for advice.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Jack Linsky

    Details

    Dimensions

    56.5 x 32.4 x 6.4 cm (22 1/4 x 12 3/4 x 2 1/2 in.)

    Accession Number

    66.385

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster, blue glass, and parcel gilding

    Not On View

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  • Panel from a Tomb

    Spanish (Catalonia)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1350–70
    Unidentified artist

    Description

    Part of a set with two other panels (66.384, 66.385).

    Provenance

    Possibly from a royal tomb, monastery church at Poblet, near Barcelona, Spain (original commission) [see note 1]. By 1923, Jacques Seligmann et Fils, Paris; April 20, 1926, sold by Seligmann to Myron C. Taylor (b. 1874 - d. 1959), New York; November 11-12, 1960, Taylor estate sale, Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, lot 898. Possibly with Blumka Gallery, New York [see note 2]. By 1966, Jack Linsky (b. 1897 - d. 1980), New York; 1966, gift of Jack Linsky to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 1, 1966) NOTES: [1] Mildred Stapley Byne wrote about the reliefs to Seligmann (November 23, 1923): "I should say that your frieze was the side slab of one of the royal tombs in Poblet, as the few which remain in the transept and nave of the church are very similar." The letter indicates Mrs. Byne's familiarity with the pieces, but does not suggest the name of a previous owner. When they were accessioned in 1966, the reliefs were believed to have come from the tomb of Pedro VI de Queralt in the sanctuary of Belloch de Santa Coloma de Queralt. [2] Blumka was consulted about the reliefs when they were acquired and appraised them. It is not clear whether the gallery had owned them, or was simply called in for advice.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Jack Linsky

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.66 x 104.14 cm (29 x 41 in.)

    Accession Number

    66.386

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster, blue glass and parcel gilding

    Not On View

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  • Shepherd with Bagpipes

    Spanish (Aragon ?)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    mid-15th century
    Unidentified artist, Spanish, 14th century

    Description

    Provenance

    1932, Joseph Pijoan (b. 1881 - d. 1963), New York; December 16, 1932, sold by Pijoan to the Brummer Gallery, New York (stock no. N3072); 1946, sold by Brummer to the MFA for $1650. (Accession Date: June 13, 1946)

    Credit Line

    Frederick Brown Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    31.8 x 22.9 x 12.7 cm (12 1/2 x 9 x 5 in.)

    Accession Number

    46.459

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster with polychromy

    Not On View

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  • Saint Jude

    Spanish (Burgos)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1500–05

    Object Place: Spain

    Description

    This figure is part of a set with 18.317 and 18.318 (Saint John the Evangelist and Saint Bartholomew).

    Provenance

    From about 1500-05 until the 19th century, tomb of Juan de Padilla, Monastery of Fresdelval, Burgos, Spain (original commission; tomb dismantled in the 19th century) [see note 1]. De Bligny collection, France. By 1916, Bacri Frères, Paris; 1917, sold by Bacri, through Walter Gay, to the MFA for $1042.23 (Accession Date: June 6, 1918) NOTES: [1] For further discussion, see Dorothy Gillerman, ed., "Gothic Sculpture in America: 1. The New England Museums" (New York, 1989), cat. no. 80, pp. 112-113.

    Credit Line

    Harriet Otis Cruft Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    70.17 x 22.2 x 12.7 cm (27 5/8 x 8 3/4 x 5 in.)

    Accession Number

    18.316

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster

    Not On View

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  • Statuette of Saint John the Evangelist

    Spanish (Burgos)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1500–05
    Workshop of Gil de Siloe (Spanish, about 1495–1563)

    Object Place: Spain

    Description

    This figure is part of a set with 18.316 and 18.318 (Saint Simon Zelotes or Saint Jude and Saint Bartholomew).

    Provenance

    From about 1500-05 until the 19th century, tomb of Juan de Padilla, Monastery of Fresdelval, Burgos, Spain (original commission; tomb dismantled in the 19th century) [see note 1]. De Bligny collection, France. By 1916, Bacri Frères, Paris; 1917, sold by Bacri, through Walter Gay, to the MFA for $2386.36 [see note 2]. (Accession Date: June 6, 1918) NOTES: [1] For further discussion, see Dorothy Gillerman, ed., "Gothic Sculpture in America: 1. The New England Museums" (New York, 1989), cat. no. 80, pp. 112-113. [2] MFA accession numbers 03.317 and 03.318 were purchased together for $2386.36.

    Credit Line

    Sarah Elizabeth Simpson Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    72.4 x 22.2 x 18.4 cm (28 1/2 x 8 3/4 x 7 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    18.317

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster

    Not On View

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  • Statuette of Saint Bartholomew

    Spanish (Burgos)
    Medieval (Gothic)
    about 1500–05

    Object Place: Spain

    Description

    This figure is part of a set with 18.316 and 18.317 (Saint Simon Zelotes or Saint Jude and Saint John the Evangelist).

    Provenance

    From about 1500-05 until the 19th century, tomb of Juan de Padilla, Monastery of Fresdelval, Burgos, Spain (original commission; tomb dismantled in the 19th century) [see note 1]. De Bligny collection, France. By 1916, Bacri Frères, Paris; 1917, sold by Bacri, through Walter Gay, to the MFA for 13,650fr. (Accession Date: June 6, 1918) NOTES: [1] For further discussion, see Dorothy Gillerman, ed., "Gothic Sculpture in America: 1. The New England Museums" (New York, 1989), cat. no. 80, pp. 112-113.

    Credit Line

    Sarah Elizabeth Simpson Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    73.3 x 18.4 x 22.86 cm (28 7/8 x 7 1/4 x 9 in.)

    Accession Number

    18.318

    Medium or Technique

    Stone; alabaster

    Not On View

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