• wordUP is a project that offers Teen Arts Council members the opportunity to present their personal perspectives on the works of art in the MFA’s collection. The teens compose text that is legitmized in the format of a wall label and displayed in perpetuity alongside the curatorial label.

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  • The Dead Christ with Angels

    about 1524–27
    Rosso Fiorentino (Giovanni Battista di Jacopo) (Italian (Florentine), 1494–1540)

    Description

    Rosso Fiorentino was one of the primary practitioners of the highly refined and decorative sixteenth-century style now known as Mannerism. It is characterized by strong, unusual colors; crowded or ambiguous space; and elongated, often twisting figures. Rosso painted this altarpiece in Rome for his friend Leonardo Tornabuoni, the bishop of Borgo San Sepolcro. Rosso’s admiration of Michelangelo’s recently painted frescoes on the Sistine Ceiling is reflected in the muscular nude body of Christ. One of very few surviving works by this exceptional artist, the painting is also unusually well preserved.

    Inscription

    Lower right, on bench: R U B E VS FLO F A CIEB A T

    Provenance

    About 1524/1527, commissioned by Bishop Leonardo di Lorenzo Tornabuoni (b. about 1494 - d. 1540), Rome; 1527, still in the artist's possession [see note 1]. By 1550, Giovanni della Casa (b. 1503 - d. 1556); until at least 1568, by descent within the Della Casa family [see note 2]. About 1812/1819, acquired in Italy by Charles IV, King of Spain (b. 1748 - d. 1819), Rome; 1820, sent to Spain [see note 3] and passed by inheritance to his son, Infante Francisco de Paula (b. 1794 - d. 1865), Madrid; probably by descent to his daughter, Infanta Maria Cristina (b. 1833 - d. 1902) and her husband, Infante Sebastián Gabriel Borbón y Braganza (b. 1811 - d. 1875), Pau, France and Madrid [see note 5]; 1837, confiscated from Braganza by Isabella II, Queen of Spain (b. 1830 - d. 1904) [see note 6]; by 1868, returned by the Queen of Spain to Sebastián Gabriel Borbón y Braganza [see note 7]; 1875, by inheritance to his widow, Infanta Maria Cristina de Borbón y Braganza (b. 1833 - d. 1902), Madrid; October, 1902, posthumous Borbón y Braganza sale, JPGM, Madrid, lot 44, not sold; until 1958, by descent within the family to Infante Don Enrique Bourbón, Madrid. 1958, Rudolf J. Heinemann (dealer, b. 1902 - d. 1975), New York; 1958, sold by Heinemann to the MFA for $85,000. (Accession Date: June 5, 1958) NOTES: [1] According to Giorgio Vasari, Rosso executed a Dead Christ with Angels for his friend, Leonardo Tornabuoni, who was the bishop of Borgo San Sepolcro ("In questo tempo fece al Vescovo Tornabuoni amico suo un quadro d'un Cristo Morto, sostenuto da due Angeli"; see "Le vite de' più eccellenti pittori, scultori ed architettori," ed. Gaetano Milanesi [Florence: Sansoni, 1880], vol. 5, p. 162). It was probably intended for an altar in San Sepolcro, but was never installed; instead, it remained in the artist's possession. In September 1527, it was in the custody of a nun at the convent of San Lorenzo in Panisperna, Rome. As attested in a document of September 29, 1527, the artist, at that time in San Sepolcro, attempted to recuperate the panel -- described as a Pietà with the figure of Christ surrounded by angels -- and other of his possessions from the nun; with all probability this can be identified with the MFA painting. It is possible that Rosso had left his belongings with her just prior to the sack of Rome in May, 1527. Whether the panel was returned to Rosso is unknown, but it seems unlikely, since it was in Rome by 1550 and had, therefore, probably remained there (see below, n. 2). See David Franklin, "Rosso in Italy: The Italian Career of Rosso Fiorentino" (New Haven, 1994), 139-142; the 1527 document is transcribed on p. 309. [2] In the first edition of Vasari's "Vite de' più eccellenti pittori..." (1550), the painting is said to be owned by Giovanni della Casa ("oggi è appresso Monsignor della Casa"). The second edition (1568) states that it is with his heirs ("oggi è appresso agli eredi di monsignor Della Casa"). [3] The identification of the MFA painting with the Dead Christ by Rosso Fiorentino listed in Charles IV's posthumous inventory was made by Gabriele Finaldi, "Works by Alessandro Turchi for Spain and an unexpected Velázquez connection," Burlington Magazine 149 (November, 2007): 758, n. 57. [4] Arturo Perera, "Carlos IV, 'Mecenas' y coleccionista de obras de arte," Arte Español 1958, pp. 28, 30. [5] In 1835, it was listed in his inventory, "Galería de Pinturas del Serenísimo Señor Ynfante Don Sebastian Gabriel," 1835, no. 181 (attributed to Fosquini). Archivo de Palacio, Sección Histórica, caja 123, as cited by Mercedes Agueda, "La colleción e pinturas del infante Don Sebastián Gabriel," Boletín del Museo del Prado, III, 8 (1982), p. 113. [6] In 1837, Sebastián Gabriel Maria de Borbón y Braganza's possessions were confiscated for political reasons and the paintings were exhibited in the Museo de la Trinidad. [7] The painting was returned to Braganza when he recognized Isabella II as the Queen of Spain.

    Credit Line

    Charles Potter Kling Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    133.4 x 104.1 cm (52 1/2 x 41 in.)

    Accession Number

    58.527

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on panel

    On View

    Museum Council Gallery (Gallery 254)

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  • Portrait of a Young Married Couple

    about 1621–22
    Jacob Jordaens (Flemish, 1593–1678)

    Description

    Although the sitters in this portrait are unidentified, in all likelihood they were husband and wife. The painting has the typical format of a seventeenth-century marriage portrait, and the ivy clinging to the architecture behind them is a symbol of marital love and fidelity. Although the figures’ poses suggest an affectionate connection to one another, their faces turn to the spectator.

    Provenance

    1880, possibly John Robert Townshend, 1st Earl Sydney (b. 1805 - d. 1890), Kent, England [see note 1]. 1907, Messrs. Lawrie and Co., London; 1907, sold by Lawrie, through Blakeslee Galleries, New York, to Robert Dawson Evans (d. 1909), Boston; 1909, by inheritance to Mrs. Robert Dawson Evans (Maria Antoinette Hunt) (b. 1845 - d. 1917), Boston; 1917, bequest of Mrs. Robert Dawson Evans to the MFA [see note 2]. (Accession Date: November 1, 1917) NOTES: [1] According to notes in the curatorial file, the Earl of Sydney lent a painting attributed to Rubens to the Royal Academy in 1880 (no. 54, "A Lady and a Gentleman," 48 1/2 x 36 1/2 in.). [2] Accessioned as a work by Peter Paul Rubens.

    Credit Line

    Robert Dawson Evans Collection

    Details

    Dimensions

    124.5 x 92.4 cm (49 x 36 3/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    17.3232

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on panel

    On View

    William I. Koch Gallery (Gallery 250)

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  • Saint Cecilia

    about 1645
    Bernardo Cavallino (Italian (Neapolitan), 1622–1654)

    Description

    Cavallino painted about twenty single-figure religious and allegorical “portraits.” Music was a favorite subject: five of these works depict musicians, including three of Cecilia, their patron saint. Like many artists of his generation, Cavallino used light and shadow to enhance the composition’s drama. His clever depiction of Cecilia’s crimson gown unfurling into the background provides a lyrical, visual interpretation of the tune ushering forth from her violin.

    Provenance

    With Thomas Agnew and Sons, London [see note 1]. By 1928, Metropolitan Galleries, New York; 1935, sold by Metropolitan Galleries to Julius H. Weitzner (dealer), New York [see note 2]; 1936, acquired by exchange from Julius Weitzner by the MFA. (Accession Date: April 16, 1936) NOTES: [1] There is an Agnew label on the reverse of the painting's stretcher. [2] According to Julius Weitzner (letter to James Plaut of the MFA, September 24, 1936): "It was acquired about twenty years ago by a deceased New York dealer at a sale in Christie's as by Caravaggio. The painting was on the New York market for years as by Caravaggio. ...[I]n 1926-1927 when Dr. Hermann Voss...visited New York I took him to see the painting at a Fifth Avenue gallery.... Last Spring I acquired it from the Fifth Avenue gallery." The painting was certainly with Metropolitan Galleries by 1928 (the year Dr. Voss is known to have visited the U.S.); it was featured in an advertisement that ran in Art Quarterly 2, no. 15 (May 1, 1928), as by Caravaggio.

    Credit Line

    William Sturgis Bigelow Collection, by exchange

    Details

    Dimensions

    92.7 x 74.3 cm (36 1/2 x 29 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    36.269

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    William I. Koch Gallery (Gallery 250)

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  • Apollo and the Muses on Mount Helicon

    1680
    Claude Lorrain (Claude Gellée) (French (active in Rome), 1600–1682)

    Description

    Born in the Lorraine region of France, Claude settled early in Italy and spent most of his life painting the countryside around Rome, with its many associations to the ancient world. This painting, done when he was eighty-two years old, represents Apollo, god of poetry and music, surrounded by the nine Muses, goddesses of the creative arts. At the upper right is the winged horse Pegasus, who has kicked a rock to release the spring that is the source of artistic inspiration. Although most of Claude’s paintings included biblical or classical themes, their true subject was the light, atmosphere, and poetic mood of the natural world.

    Inscription

    Lower center: PARNASS[...]PARN[...]SS [...] CL[...]D[...] (indistinct)

    Provenance

    1680, Prince Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna (b. 1637- d. 1689), Rome (original commission); probably until 1789, by descent within the family; 1789, probably sold by the Colonna family, Rome [see note 1]. Acquired in Rome by Robert Sloane (d. 1802); 1803/1804, imported to England by Sloane's widow; 1804, Sloane sale, Mr. Bryan's Picture Gallery, London, bought in; sold privately to William Buchanan (b. 1777 - d. 1864), London; May 24, 1808, Buchanan sale, Oxenden Street, London, lot 7, bought in [see note 2]. Rev. William Holwell Carr (b. 1758 - d. 1830), London (?) [see note 3]. Walsh Porter (d. 1809), Bath (?); sold or passed by descent to Porter's brother-in-law, William Scrope (b. 1772 - d. 1852), Castle Coombe, Wiltshire; June 10, 1815, Scrope sale, Christie, Manson, and Woods, London, lot 10, withdrawn; April 6, 1816, Scrope sale, Christie, Manson and Woods, lot A92, to Bernard Pinney (for Scrope?) [see note 4]. By 1824, possibly Aynard collection, Paris (?) [see note 5]. May 10, 1827, possibly anonymous sale, George Stanley, London, lot 92 (?) [see note 6]. Edward Gray; by 1854, sold by Gray to Wynn Ellis (b. 1790 - d. 1875), London [see note 7]; June 17, 1876, Ellis estate sale, Christie, Manson and Woods, London, lot 6, to Waters; probably acquired from Waters by William Graham (b. 1817 - d. 1885), Oakdene, near Guildford, Surrey; April 8, 1886, Graham estate sale, Christie, Manson and Woods, London, lot 376, to William Grindlay (d. by 1887), London; April 23, 1887, posthumous Grindlay sale, Christie, Manson, and Woods, London, lot 99. 1889, Thomas Humphry Ward (b. 1845 - d. 1926), London [see note 8]. June 28, 1890, anonymous sale, Christie, Manson, and Woods, lot 95, to Sir William James Farrer (b. 1845 - d. 1906), London; March 23, 1912, posthumous Farrer sale, Christie, Manson and Woods, London, lot 5, to Agnew, London (stock no. 3915); April 29, 1912, sold by Agnew to Trotti et Cie., Paris; 1912, sold by Trotti to the MFA for 180 pounds (British sterling). (Accession Date: October 3, 1912) NOTES: [1] See Marcel Röthlisberger, "Claude Lorrain, The Paintings." (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1961), vol. 1, no. LV 193, pp. 451-454. Röthlisberger identifies the painting in Filippo III Colonna's 1783 inventory (no. 152) and in a Colonna inventory of 1787 (no. 78). [2] Information on the sales was first provided in a letter to the MFA from Burton Fredericksen (September 6, 1988) and can also be accessed online at the Getty Provenance Index (http://piweb.getty.edu): Description of Sale Catalog Br-273; Description of Sale Catalog Br-587. [3] According to Röthlisberger (as above, n. 1), Carr is recorded as the owner in the inscription found on an aquatint of 1812 and he "probably put up [the painting at auction] under the more famous name of Porter" in 1815 and 1816. Curiously, in discussing the history of the Colonna Parnassus imported by Sloane, Buchanan does not mention it among the paintings he sold in 1808, nor those owned by Porter or Carr, who had been his business partner. See his "Memoirs of Painting" (London, 1824), vol. 2, pp. 112-117. [4] The auction catalogue of 1816 includes it among the paintings that had belonged to Walsh Porter, although unlike the others from his collection, it did not appear in his posthumous sales (April 14, 1810, June 21, 1811). There can be no doubt that this is the MFA painting, however, as its description in the Scrope sales of 1815 and 1816 matches that of the MFA work. According to information provided by the Getty Provenance Index (Description of Sale Catalog Br-1376) this painting was bought in and remained with Scrope until his after his death in 1852. This would make its ownership by Aynard by 1824 impossible. [5] Buchanan (as above, n. 3), pp. 117, 389. [6] It is unclear whether this is the painting now at the MFA. The sale catalogue does not describe the painting, except to say that it is known as the 'Colonna Claude' and it 'is too well known to need description'. It can be assumed that this refers to the MFA composition, although several paintings by Claude Lorrain were in the Colonna collection. The catalogue gives the provenance as Rev. Holwell Carr, Mr. Walsh Porter, and Lord Kinnaird. It has not been indicated elsewhere that the MFA painting was owned by Kinnaird. [7] Gustav Friedrich Waagen, "Treasures of Art of Great Britain," vol. 2 (London, 1854), p. 294, no. 3. [8] According to Rothlisberger (as above, n. 1) he lent the painting to an exhibition at Whitechapel, St. Jude's, 1889, no. 97.

    Credit Line

    Picture Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    99.7 x 136.5 cm (39 1/4 x 53 3/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    12.1050

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    William I. Koch Gallery (Gallery 250)

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  • Grotto by the Seaside in the Kingdom of Naples with Banditti, Sunset

    1778
    Joseph Wright of Derby (English, 1734–1797)

    Description

    Wright was an inventive and talented artist who painted portraits, landscapes, and unusual images of contemporary life. He spent most of his career in his native Derby in England, but a trip to Italy in 1773–75 provided much material for his art. He witnessed an eruption of Mount Vesuvius and sketched the grottoes off the coast of Salerno, near Naples; both subjects became favorites for his later work. A group of melancholy bandits adds a picturesque note to this composition, one of Wright’s most important grotto paintings. With its hazy atmosphere and soft, golden light, the landscape is at once poetic and realistic.

    Provenance

    1780, sold by the artist to Josiah Cockshutt (b. 1737 - d. 1801), Chaddesden, Derbyshire [see note 1]; by descent from Cockshutt to his grandson, Cockshutt Heathcote (b. 1793 - d. 1885), Derbyshire; 1840, from Heathcote to Godfrey Meynell, Meynell Langley, Derbyshire [see note 2]; until 1986, by descent within the Meynell family; July 9, 1986, anonymous (Meynell) sale, Sotheby's, London, lot 82, to Thomas Agnew and Sons, Ltd.; 1990, sold by Agnew to the MFA. (Accession Date: February 28, 1990) NOTES: [1] See Benedict Nicolson, "Joseph Wright of Derby: Painter of Light" (New Haven and London, 1968), vol. 1, cat. no. 277. Wright sent Cockshutt a bill on August 29, 1780, for this painting and two others, "A Cavern with the Figure of Julia," and "Virgil's Tomb." [2] The painting was accepted in lieu of payment for a debt owed to Meynell; see Nicolson (as above, n. 1) and Judy Egerton, "Wright of Derby" (exh. cat. Tate Gallery, London, 1990), p. 162, cat. no. 99.

    Credit Line

    Charles H. Bayley Picture and Painting Fund and other Funds, by exchange

    Details

    Dimensions

    121.9 x 172.7 cm (48 x 68 in.)

    Accession Number

    1990.95

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Gallery (Gallery 246)

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  • Haymaker and Sleeping Girl

    Mushroom Girl

    late 1780s
    Thomas Gainsborough (English, 1727–1788)

    Description

    The existence of a preparatory drawing indicates that Gainsborough took particular pains with this composition. Although apparently about erotic desire, the painting also offers a deeper meditation on longing and regret. The young woman’s pale skin and refined clothing suggest that she is not a country girl, whereas the hay in the youth’s hat and rake reveal that he has paused in his labors. The young man is separated from the object of his desire by social class as well as by the fence; the terrier will soon bark and shatter the young man’s idyllic reverie. Gainsborough Dupont, the artist’s nephew and apprentice, chose this painting when offered any work in his uncle’s studio.

    Provenance

    1788, gift of the artist to his nephew, Gainsborough Dupont (b. 1754 - d. 1797); April 1, 1797, Dupont sale, Christie's, London, lot 103, bought in by Crofts [see note 1]; by descent within the family to his nephew, Richard Gainsborough Dupont; June 8, 1872, Dupont sale, Christie's, London, lot 67, to White. By 1891, William Houldsworth, Halifax, Yorkshire; May 23, 1891, Houldsworth sale, Christie's, London, lot 60, to Agnew's, London (stock no. 5987); between 1903 - 1905, sold by Agnew's to Lord James Joicey, 1st Baron Joicey, Chester-Le-Street, Durham [see note 2]; about 1907, sold by Joicey to E.M. Hodgkins, Paris; from Hodgkins to Samuel G. Archibald, Paris and Montreal; March 30, 1951, posthumous Archibald sale, Parke-Bernet, New York, lot 249, to Cecil G. Doward, New York for $1800 [see note 3]. By 1953, Vose Galleries, Boston; 1953, sold by Vose Galleries to the MFA for $15,000. (Accession Date: December 10, 1953) NOTES: [1] See The Fifth Volume of the Walpole Society, 1915-16 and 1916-1917, Ed. A.J. Finberg, pg. 96, no. 103 and pg. 98, footnote 1. [2] See Century of Loan Exhibitions, Agnew's, 1903, no. 21. According to Vose, the work was possibly exhibited by Joicey in London/Glasgow in 1905. [3] According to sale catalogue annotation, the painting probably went directly from Doward to Vose.

    Credit Line

    M. Theresa B. Hopkins Fund and Seth K. Sweetser Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 227.3 x 149.9 cm (89 1/2 x 59 in.)

    Accession Number

    53.2553

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Gallery (Gallery 246)

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  • Execution of the Emperor Maximilian

    1867
    Edouard Manet (French, 1832–1883)

    Description

    In 1867, Maximilian, emperor of Mexico, was executed with two of his generals by order of the opposing leader, Benito Juárez. The Parisian press reacted with horror against the rebel troops in Mexico and against Napoleon III in France; Napoleon had installed the Austrian Maximilian on the Mexican throne in 1864, but later withdrew support for his regime. Breaking with tradition, Manet represented the contemporary event on the grand scale usually reserved for scenes from ancient history or myth. This unfinished canvas is the first of several versions.

    Provenance

    1883, probably passed by descent from the artist to his widow, Suzanne Leenhoff Manet (b. 1830 - d. 1906), Asnières, France [see note 1]; given by Mme. Manet to her son, Léon Koëlla Leenhoff (b. 1852 - d. 1927), Paris [see note 2]; 1899, sold by Mr. Koëlla Leenhoff to Ambroise Vollard (b. 1867 - d. 1939), Paris; July 1, 1909, sold by Vollard to Frank Gair Macomber (b. 1849 - d. 1941), Boston [see note 3]; 1930, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gair Macomber to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 1, 1930) NOTES: [1] The provenance given here (to 1899) is provided by Adolphe Tabarant, "Manet et ses oeuvres" (Paris, 1947), p. 176. [2] Manet married Suzanne Leenhoff in 1863. Her illegitimate son, Léon, born in 1852, was almost certainly Manet's child. He inherited Manet's estate after his mother's death. [3] The sale to Macomber is recorded in Vollard's stock book on July 1, 1909; it was shipped to Boston on September 16, 1909 (Bibliothèque des Musées Nationaux, Fonds Vollard, MS 421 [5,4] f. 134 and MS 421 [4,13] f. 19). Additionally, in a letter from Vollard to Macomber (September 11, 1909), the dealer discusses the latter's payment for the "sketch of the Execution of Maximilian, which you purchased from me." According to notes in the MFA object file (about 1939, taken by Charles C. Cunningham), Mr. Macomber said that he purchased the painting in Paris upon the advice of the painter Mary Cassatt, after she had taken him to see it at "Kelekian's shop." Whether Kelekian played a role in the transaction has not been determined. Correspondence between the MFA and Vollard, dating to September and October 1909, indicates that Vollard had been responsible for the sale and shipment of the painting.

    Credit Line

    Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gair Macomber

    Details

    Dimensions

    195.9 x 259.7 cm (77 1/8 x 102 1/4 in.)

    Accession Number

    30.444

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    The Beal Gallery (Gallery 251)

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  • Moorish Bath

    1870
    Jean-Léon Gérôme (French, 1824–1904)

    Description

    Among the most commercially successful artists of the nineteenth century, Gérôme built his reputation as an Orientalist, painting scenes of an imaginary place that combined characteristics of North Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean with his own fantasies and inventions. Here Gérôme afforded his viewer a glimpse into the private world of a woman’s bath, a scene he surely never witnessed. The pale, red-headed nude—perhaps meant to suggest a Circassian slave from the far reaches of the Ottoman Empire—forms a striking contrast to her African attendant in the sun-dappled interior of an Islamic bathhouse.

    Inscription

    Upper right, on top of bench: J.L. GEROME

    Provenance

    1870, gift of the artist to H. J. Turner; April 4, 1903, sold by Turner at Christie's, London, lot 138, and bought by Arthur Tooth and Sons, London, Paris, and New York [see note 1]; 1903, sold by Tooth and Sons to J. D. Milburn, Esquire [see note 2]. Eben D. Jordan, Boston, MA; by 1924, by descent to Robert Jordan, Boston, MA; 1924, gift of Robert Jordan to the MFA. (Accession Date: April 17, 1924) NOTES: [1] presumably this is Tooth London trans. no. 2936, Gérôme, "Bain Mauve," 20 x 16 [2] the name in the stock inventory for 1903 is illegible, name cited in Picture Sales Vol. II, p. 37

    Credit Line

    Gift of Robert Jordan from the collection of Eben D. Jordan

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 50.8 x 40.6cm (20 x 16in.) Other (Framed): 82.6 x 14 x 73cm (32 1/2 x 5 1/2 x 28 3/4in.)

    Accession Number

    24.217

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

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  • Duchessa di Montejasi with Her Daughters, Elena and Camilla

    about 1876
    Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917)

    Place of Origin: France

    Description

    Stéphanie Primicile Carafa, Marchesa di Cicerale and Duchessa di Montejasi, was the sister of Degas’s father. Their father, a Frenchman who fled to Naples during the French Revolution, eventually established a banking house there. This is the last of Degas’s great family portraits. It is also among the most surprising. The portrayal of the artist’s Aunt Fanny is without flattery, delicately balanced between austerity and empathy. Her frontal, static, focused image is contrasted with the lively bearing of her daughters, whose sense of movement is increased by the offhand way in which the artist painted, then wiped away, their portraits.

    Provenance

    Probably given by the artist to his aunt, Stéphanie De Gas Primicile-Carafa, Marquesa di Cicerale and Duchessa di Montejasi (b. 1819 - d. 1901), Naples [see note 1]. 1923, sold by Vincent Imberti (dealer), Bordeaux, France to David David-Weill (b. 1871 - d. 1952), Paris and Neuilly-sur-Seine, France; by descent to his grandchildren, Paris; 2003, sold by the descendants of David David-Weill to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 25, 2003) NOTES: [1] The provenance information given here (through 1923) comes from Jean Sutherland Boggs et al., "Degas" (exh. cat., Paris, Ottawa, and New York, 1988/1989), p. 254, cat. no. 146.

    Credit Line

    Museum purchase with funds by exchange from the Tompkins Collection—Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, a Gift of Mrs. Robert B. Osgood in memory of Horace D. Chapin, and a Gift in memory of Governor Alvan T. Fuller by the Fuller Foundation; and from the Charles H. Bayley Picture and Painting Fund, William Francis Warden Fund, Frank B. Bemis Fund, James E. Neill Memorial Fund, Fanny P. Mason Fund in memory of Alice Thevin, Mary S. and Edward Jackson Holmes Fund, Tompkins Collection—Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, Ernest Wadsworth Longfellow Fund, Frederick L. Jack Fund, Seth K. Sweetser Fund, M. Theresa B. Hopkins Fund, Harriet Otis Cruft Fund, Gift of Jessie H. Wilkinson—Jessie H. Wilkinson Fund, Lucy Dalbiac Luard Fund, Grant Walker Fund, Helen B. Sweeney Fund, and European Paintings Deaccession Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    Overall: 66 x 97.8 cm (26 x 38 1/2 in.) Framed: 88.9 x 121.9 x 7.6 cm (35 x 48 x 3 in.)

    Accession Number

    2003.250

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    On View

    Sidney and Esther Rabb Gallery (Gallery 255)

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  • Dance at Bougival

    1883
    Pierre-Auguste Renoir (French, 1841–1919)

    Description

    The open-air cafés of suburban Bougival, on the Seine outside Paris, were popular recreation spots for city dwellers, including the Impressionist painters. Renoir, who was primarily a figure painter, uses intense color and lush brushwork to heighten the sense of pleasure conveyed by the whirling couple who dominate the composition. The woman’s face, framed by her red bonnet, is the focus of attention, both ours and her companion’s.

    Inscription

    Lower right: Renoir. 83.

    Provenance

    April 16, 1883, deposited by the artist with Durand-Ruel, Paris; November 12, 1884, returned to the artist; February 19, 1886, deposited by the artist with Durand-Ruel and shipped to New York; November 22, 1886, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel and sold the same day to Mme. Hiltbrunner; June 15, 1889, deposited by Mme. Hiltbrunner with Durand-Ruel; August 25, 1891, sold by Mme. Hiltbrunner to Durand-Ruel and, in September, 1891, transferred back to Paris [see note 1]; January 2, 1894, sold by Durand-Ruel, Paris to Félix-François Depeaux (b. 1853 - d. 1920), Rouen; May 31 - June 1, 1906, Depeaux sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, lot 38, to Depeaux's brother-in-law, Edmond Décap, Paris; by descent to Maurice Barret-Décap, Biarritz, France; 1937, sold by Barret-Décap, possibly through Anthony H. Manley, Paris [see note 2] to the dealers Paul Brame (b. 1898 - d. 1971) and César de Hauke (b. 1900), Paris, for Jacques Seligmann et Fils, Paris [see note 3]; March 19, 1937, transferred from Seligmann, Paris, to Jacques Seligmann and Co., New York; April, 1937, sold by Seligmann, New York, to the MFA for $150,000. (Accession Date: May 5, 1937) NOTES: [1] The early provenance and information about Durand-Ruel's transactions is taken from Colin B. Bailey, Renoir, Impressionism, and Full-Length Painting (exh. cat. Frick Collection, New York, 2012), p. 212. [2] Maurice Barret-Décap owned the painting until at least February 9, 1937, as his correspondence with Seligmann attests. The provenance provided by Seligmann at the time of the painting's acquisition lists the name of Anthony Manley after that of Barret-Décap. The gallery's shipping papers from March 19, 1937, note that it was purchased from Manley on February 13 (year illegible; presumably 1937); Manley also wrote to Seligmann on April 3, 1937, regarding the payment of interest on the painting. It is possible that Barret-Décap sold the work to Seligmann through Manley, that the two men owned it jointly, or that Manley owned the work for a very short period of time, around February 9-13, 1937. [3] De Hauke was a sales representative for Jacques Seligmann and Co. While he purchased works of art that were sold by the gallery, the ownership of the objects was often officially shared by several art dealers, and the transactions became quite complicated. De Hauke and Brame worked together on several occasions.

    Credit Line

    Picture Fund

    Details

    Dimensions

    181.9 x 98.1 cm (71 5/8 x 38 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    37.375

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Out on Loan

    On display at Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Japan, March 19, 2016 – August 21, 2016

    Collections

    Europe

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  • Rape of the Sabine Women

    1963
    Pablo Picasso (Spanish (worked in France), 1881–1973)

    Description

    Painted when he was eighty-two, this is Picasso’s last major statement about the horrors of war, perhaps inspired by the Cuban missile crisis. Here, Picasso transforms a familiar subject from the art of the past-the story of early Romans who, suffering a shortage of marriageable women, invited the neighboring Sabines to Rome and then carried off all their young women. Against a sunny background of blue sky and green fields, the overlapping forms of grotesquely distorted figures are compressed into the foreground space, the horses and soldiers trampling a woman and her child.

    Inscription

    Upper right: Picasso; Reverse: 4.1.63. / 10. / 11. / 12. / 13. / 14. / 15. / 16. / 17. / 18. / 19. / 20. / 21. / 22. / 23. / 25. / 26. / 28. / 29. / 31. / 2.2.63. / 7. (in irregular columns)

    Provenance

    Probably sold by the artist to the Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris [see note 1]; 1964, sold by the Galerie Leiris to M. Knoedler and Co., New York (stock no. A8624); 1964, sold by Knoedler to the MFA. (Accession Date: May 13, 1964) NOTES: [1] It was included in the exhibition "Picasso Peintures 1962-1963" (Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris, January 15 - February 15, 1964), cat. no. 17.

    Credit Line

    Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection, Tompkins Collection—Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, and Fanny P. Mason Fund in memory of Alice Thevin

    Copyright

    © 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

    Details

    Dimensions

    195.3 x 131.1 cm (76 7/8 x 51 5/8 in.)

    Accession Number

    64.709

    Medium or Technique

    Oil on canvas

    Not On View

    Collections

    Contemporary Art, Europe

    Classifications

    Paintings

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