Support for one-legged table

Roman
Imperial Period
about A.D.150–225


Catalogue Raisonné

Sculpture in Stone (MFA), no. 219; Sculpture in Stone and Bronze (MFA), p. 112 (additional published references).

Dimensions

Height: 80 cm (31 1/2 in.)

Accession Number

1970.241

Medium or Technique

Marble, probably from the Greek island of Paros

On View

Classical Roman Gallery (Gallery 213)

Collections

The Ancient World

Classifications

Sculpture

Support for one-legged table (monopodium) decorated with figures of Dionysus (Bacchus) and a panther.

The god wears a crown of grape leaves and a fawn’s skin while the panther at his right places a forepaw on the sacred cista or basket. The god’s lowered right hand once held a kantharos, and the raised left may have grasped his thyrsos, or pinecone-topped staff. The Praxitelean in form and proportions are in keeping with the tendency in the second and third centuries A.D. to show Dionysus as a youthful deity. The drilling of his eyes suggests that this piece was carved between A.D. 150 and 225.

Such tables were used in both public and domestic settings for for a variety of purposes, such as altar tables for holding offerings, to hold images of the household gods (lares), or for the display of treasured objects.

The panther’s head has been broken and reset, but it appears to be ancient and belonging. The surfaces are worn and are now a yellow-buff.

Scientific Analysis:
Harvard Lab No. HI730a: Isotope ratios - delta13C +1.89 / delta18O -3.89, Harvard Lab No. HI730b: Isotope ratios - delta13C +2.11 / delta18O -3.76, Attribution - Paros 2, Ephesos 2, Aphrodisias 2, Usak, Mani, Heracleia, Justification - Medium grained marble.

Provenance

By 1960: with Ars Antiqua AG., Haldenstrasse 5, Lucerne, Switzerland (auction 2, Hotel Schweizerhof, Lucerne, May 14, 1960, lot 59) (said to be from a collection in Scotland); by 1965 with Royal Athena Galleries, 24 East 80th Street, New York (Art of the Ancient World, I, New York, 1965, no. 37); by 1970: Paul E. Manheim Collection; gift of Paul E. Manheim to MFA, March 11, 1970

Credit Line

Gift of Paul E. Manheim